Goodbye bad poppets

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easttex

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MicroMickey

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With pin locks, the couplings have provision for 2 or 3 pins. On ball locks, one post is a little bigger than the other. You'll almost certainly find someone who has put a coupling on the wrong post which makes them really tough to remove.
 

Brewbuzzard

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I've used needle nose too but something I found better were some of the picks I had from a set of various angled/shaped picks I bought many years ago. It was a pretty handy set but most have broken or gotten lost. Mostly worn out over time. As an example, one of the set looked like a dentist cleaning pick with a hook. That was one of the best ones. I have just one or two of the oddball ones left. For OEM poppets, I found hooking the "ankle" to work well without bending the leg itself. Steady gentle pull they are kind of bendy. I used to break them down completely but now do it less frequently since I built a keg washer.

Here's an example pick set.
I have a set like that. I bought it at Harbor freight for a few bucks. Very handy.
 

odie

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On ball locks, one post is a little bigger than the other. You'll almost certainly find someone who has put a coupling on the wrong post which makes them really tough to remove.
Find me someone who HASN"T done that...lol

I'm guilty of multiple offenses...
 

Garfield43

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I have a set like that. I bought it at Harbor freight for a few bucks. Very handy.
I have a similar set from Menards that were either cheap or free after rebate. Very handy for changing gaskets. Unfortunately I got carried away when I bought my first keg. I took all the gaskets off. Had a little trouble with 2 of them. Then I got looking at the replacement gasket set and noticed it didn't have the 2 smallest "gaskets". I had pried the rubber off of the poppets. Those don't go back on. I bought a new set of Cornelius poppets becase I thought trimming the universals would be a pain. According to this post it looks like could have saved money and used the universals. Live and learn.

passedpawn, Thanks for the tip about the bulk pack O rings. I just ordered the 100 pack of red for about 5 bucks. That should be a life time supply. Do you happen to know what number the large O ring and the little one for the dip tube is? If I could find a source for those I could quit paying $2.50 a set for them.
 
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chessking

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Not to hijack this thread but on the old leg style poppets I have one set that I cannot remove from the post. The legs are jammed into the threads so makes it very hard to clean. I normally disassemble everything and clean and sanitize each keg after it kicks. Any good tricks to get these poppets out of the post?
The cylinder where the legs go should not have any threads. It should be smooth. the outward pressure of the legs keep it in place. You may have to drive it out with a punch and destroy the poppet in doing so, but they are easily replaced.

I have always placed the terminal on the flat of my sink (SS), and used a small screwdriver to push it in from the top. Sometimes I have to give it a gentle pop with the heal of my hand. That being said, I also adjust the three legs with pliers to just fit snugly enough not to fall out. That makes removal easy. I then replace them by turning over the post, and pushing the leg "crown" in with a small nut driver. This places an even force on the legs, and not the center rod. Push the legs in just enough to catch, but not so far that it impedes the poppet head from retracting.

Also, I only have 9 kegs, and four fermenters, but I keep all of them full, so when a keg blows, I can fill it straight off, and start my next brew. Never any need to clean more than 1 keg at a time.
 
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