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Forward sealing stout faucets - do they exist?

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kal

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I have 4 Perlick forward sealing faucets right now and love them. They never stick. Zero issues with beers that only get poured once a week.



I'm thinking of replacing one with a stout faucet to serve with beer blend gas (75% C02, 25% N2) to get that creamy head for the beer styles that would benefit (clones of beer like Boddingtons, Caffreys, etc).

I would carb these beers at around 8-10 psi using regular (100% pure) CO2. Once they are carbed I would dispense with beer gas at about 30 PSI out of the stout faucet which has the restrictor plate in place to give that nice, smooth, creamy headed beer.

Questions:

Does this make sense?
Do stout faucets get 'stuck' like regular rear-sealing faucets?
Is there anyone that makes forward sealing stout faucets?
My understanding is that you can't use a regular faucet (such as my Perlicks) for beer gas due the high pressure needed. It would make a huge mess.

Kal
 

Jif

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I was under the impression that all stout faucets were forward sealing, so that's why you never see any advertised as such. I'm just working off bits of information I remember hearing, so I could be quite wrong.
 

McSwiggin'

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Actually most creamer faucets are neither forward or rear sealing faucets. The faucet opens when the handle pulls "up" on the seal. This is accomplished through a lever action on the handle when you pull it. Sticking should not be too big of a problem. Just be sure you soak your resistor plate in hot water every week or so and yu should be fine.
 
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kal

kal

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Thanks guys.

Soak the resistor plate every week? So you need to disconnect the keg and disassemble the entire tap every week to get at this plate I assume or is it simpler than that.

Kal

P.S. Someone asked me in PM for my clone recipes... I don't have any - I was just using those beer types as examples of what I'd like to make eventually. Sorry! ;)
 

KYB

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No, you just unscrew the spout and the restrictor plate is at the top of it.
 
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kal

kal

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Cool. That's easy. You could then also use that faucet to serve at regular C02 pressures too.

Can anyone recommend a good Stout faucet? Cost is secondary.

Kal
 

KYB

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I've only came across the standard chrome one and the SS one. However, I went on Ebay and picked up 2 Guinness faucets. One was used in a bar, came with sankey, the other was new. Both came with Guinness handles. I got them cheaper than I could find the chrome faucet. Might want to look on ebay first.
 
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kal

kal

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Nice guys - thanks!

I just thought of something: Anyone have any idea how far out these taps stick as compared to Perlicks? I can't find dimensions anywhere. My drip tray's not very deep so this tape can't be much deeper than Perlicks otherwise drips won't fall in the tray.

Kal
 

HenryHill

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I've only came across the standard chrome one and the SS one. However, I went on Ebay and picked up 2 Guinness faucets. One was used in a bar, came with sankey, the other was new. Both came with Guinness handles. I got them cheaper than I could find the chrome faucet. Might want to look on ebay first.
I'd love to see a pic of these.
 

McSwiggin'

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They are roughly the same projection, it varies from model to model. The guinness faucet is unique, and only made for guinness so it's dimensions are a little different. The perlick is pretty standard with the rest of them. Stout faucets don't usually drip a whole lot. Avtually, none of your faucets should drip too much. If you are seeing drips on a regular basis, take the faucet apart and clean the rubber on the plunger and run a brush through the faucet body. You may have some penicillin mold growing around the seal, or the seal may be damaged.


Every time you clean your lines, (should be done at least once a month if not more often) you should take your faucets apart and scrub em. If there is any stubborn gunk in there, just soak in hot water and BLC or DAC (or any alkaline cleaner) and hit with the brush. You should also check your lines for beer stone deposits while you are cleaning. If you can't get the stone out, just swap out with new line (always keep line and clamps on hand). Stouts are notorious beer stone makers. The stone will affect the quality of the beer and lead to off aromas and flavors along with a string of other issues.
 

McSwiggin'

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QUOTE=kal;1203132] You could then also use that faucet to serve at regular C02 pressures too.

Can anyone recommend a good Stout faucet? Cost is secondary.

Kal[/QUOTE]

Yes, you can do this, and most people do without much trouble. One tip is to try and find a creamer faucet with a flow adjuster. While not necesarry, it does help as with certain beers you may have a foaming issue if you pour without the restricor plate. There are several flow adjusters out there but the screw-type dial seems to be the best IMO. This one is in-line, but there are some that are made with a barrel-type manifold that work extremely well.


Stout Faucets - Alumasc with ADJUSTABLE FLOW CONTROL Alumasc Stout Faucet [Faucet -Almsc FlwRst - 12B03-123] - $104.75 : CHI Company ball lock kegs for sale, Home brewing and vending, beer kegs, Pepsi vending machines, flavor strips and vending label

You are going to want to keep this at maximum flow when using the restrictor plate for most stouts that are carbed lightly and dial it down for any ales you are going to cream that are carbed heavier. You also dial it down when not using the restricor plate. In your original post you stated that you were planning to carb to "normal" levels then use the beer gas to push. Thats fine, but you will have better results with the flow dialed down a little since "normal" levels are a bit higher than stouts like Guinness are usually carbed at. You only need full force when your stouts are carbed lightly. Don't try to adjust flow by adjusting dispensing pressure as this will not allow the faucet to do it's job (unless you are dispensing with straight CO2 and risk over-carbonating). I know many do this and feel they get good results, but they would be surprised how improved thier mothfeel and head retention will be if they don't do this. You should be dispensing (your stout faucet) at 25psi - 35psi (with mix) on a standard kegerator and your lines for your stout faucet should be balanced to operate in those parameters.

Make sure you have your flow straigthener in place whenever using the restrictor plate (small cone shaped plastic piece). I recommend keeping an extra restrictor and flow straigthener on hand in case you lose one.

I guess the point to this long-winded post is this:
-Lightly carbed beers with restrictor and mix - full low
-heavily carbed beers with restrictor and mix - dialed down flow
-beers without mix or restrictor - dispensing and faucet set for best results based on your system temp, line length and height to faucet.

It looks like your taps are higher than a standard kegerator and mounted through the wall. If you need help with balancing once you get your faucet, just let me know.

Another note - you will have to get a different regulator for you beer mix and you have many options as to how you want to set up dispensing, i.e. - push all beer with beer mix (it can be done) or have a stand-alone beer mix tank for your stouts.
 
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