Flaked grain?

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Braid

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What exactly does flaked grain do for beers that the regular grain won't? And are flaked oats the same as the rolled oats you can get at the grocery store?
 

Freezeblade

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flaked oats are the same as rolled oats. In flaked grain, the starches are pre-gelationized (sp) so it is mash read, where if you buy raw wheat or raw oats they need to be cereal mashed to do this (basically boiling). Flaked grains introduce proteins that lead to a smoother mouthfeel and help head retention, but can also make a beer cloudy if used above 7 percent or so of the mash.
 

flyangler18

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Flaked grain isn't malted, so it doesn't have any diastatic power to convert itself so it has to be mashed with a base malt.

Flaked barley is used for head retention, body and mouthfeel; same as flaked oats (rolled oats from the grocery store). Proteins, lipids and starches are all present.
 

giligson

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grain are passed through hot steel rollers that gelatinize the proteins so that you can just toss them into the mash without having to do a separate cereal mash - saves time.
Only certain grains are normally available flaked:
oats, wheat, rye, corn.
 
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Braid

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Thank you for the quick replies!!! I can understand the oats, wheat, rye, and corn, but I'm doing a recipe that calls for a lot of flaked barley. In a previous post i asked if I can just use regular milled barley and got a definitive "NO". The recipe is for a Guiness clone and I'm just wondering exactly what the flaked variety does that the regular won't. Is it just the mouth feel? Will it help in making it darker? Oh sooooo many things to learn!
 

flyangler18

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Thank you for the quick replies!!! I can understand the oats, wheat, rye, and corn, but I'm doing a recipe that calls for a lot of flaked barley. In a previous post i asked if I can just use regular milled barley and got a definitive "NO". The recipe is for a Guiness clone and I'm just wondering exactly what the flaked variety does that the regular won't. Is it just the mouth feel? Will it help in making it darker? Oh sooooo many things to learn!
Flaked barley is a classic ingredient in dry stout, approximately 20% of the grist. It will contribute to strong head retention and mouthfeel. There's no color contribution, that all comes from the roasted barley. You just can't make a dry stout without flaked barley. :D
 
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