First attempt to harvest yeast fail?

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STMF

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It looks quite normal. There is alot of yeast in there, not just the top layer.
 

kh54s10

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The thin whiter layer is mostly yeast, but the trub below and the liquid above also contain a lot of yeast. It looks good.
 

kh54s10

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Thanks everyone. Should I move this into smaller mason jars then?
Only if you want to split it up for multiple uses. If it is the entire yeast cake from the fermenter you don't need all of it for your next one. If you use it within a few weeks. Maybe 1/3 to 1/2 for the next batch.
 
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wisenuts

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If there is more than one use in there I would like to split it up. More questions. Let me know at any point if I should start a new thread

1)How do I split it evenly
2)How do I get the right amount of yeast into the next batch?
3)Should I only use this yeast for the exact same kind of beer? (this was a chinook ipa batch)
 

pshankstar

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If there is more than one use in there I would like to split it up. More questions. Let me know at any point if I should start a new thread

1)How do I split it evenly
2)How do I get the right amount of yeast into the next batch?
3)Should I only use this yeast for the exact same kind of beer? (this was a chinook ipa batch)
I'll take a stab at this.

1. Set it out to warm up and then shake it well to mix it all up. Then split it in half that way or in thirds. This would be the easiest way but not perfect. You can then chill it and decant it later on.
2. For the most accurate way get a microscope and count the cells. Otherwise as @kh54s10 said, 1/2 or 1/3 would be most likely good enough. If it is a stronger brew maybe go towards 1/2.
3. How was the last brew dry hopped? Were the hops in a bag to minimize the amount of hop particles? If so, then I don't see an issue with using it for a different style beer. If it's another IPA then I would say it doesn't matter. Or you could wash the yeast before pitching. There are lots of threads on this here at HBT.

I hope this helps and makes sense! Again that harvest looks good IMO. Cheers!
 

HausBrauerei_Harvey

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I've been doing this for years now. I've also gone way beyond the generation recommendations with my saison yeast and i'm on like the 30th batch with that stuff now, it still tastes great. Good practice and sanitation is key.

Some tips: make sure your jar is always cleaned then sterilized before pouring in the slurry.

I generally use the yeast from the jar only once, why keep it around to use again when you could use the fresher yeast cake from the beer you just pitched into.?

Mr malty has a slurry calculator, but as a conservative estimate I always use is 1 billion cells/mL of slurry.

If the cake is older than 2 weeks, even if i am using the correct pitch of slurry, I usually 'wake up' the yeast with a 500ml starter on a stir plate, when I do this I usually have krausen in about 4-8 hours from pitching. If I dont wake up the older yeast it can take 24 hours to get to high krausen.

I recently chatted at length with a very knowledgeable 'yeast wrangler' type brewer with a cell biology background. He said the yeast in your jar naturally stratifies when it settles like in your picture: decant off the beer and the top white creamy layer, those are mutant or deviant cells. The bottom is likely mostly dead cells. The middle of your cake is those cells you want to pitch into your beer.

hope this helps it find it's a really great way to always have fresh yeast around and to keep a decent stock of strains on-hand, for free!
 

HausBrauerei_Harvey

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1. Set it out to warm up and then shake it well to mix it all up. Then split it in half that way or in thirds. This would be the easiest way but not perfect. You can then chill it and decant it later on.
I'm not trying to troll here but I would never mix in that old stale beer to my yeast cake, this will confuse your volume based cell estimates for packed yeast slurry and mix stale beer into your new wort with the cells you are pitching. I always decant this off then let warm to RT.
 

pshankstar

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I'm not trying to troll here but I would never mix in that old stale beer to my yeast cake, this will confuse your volume based cell estimates for packed yeast slurry and mix stale beer into your new wort with the cells you are pitching. I always decant this off then let warm to RT.
Sorry for the confusion, let me clarify. I would take what the OP has now from the photo. Let it rise to room temp as is (don't decant just yet). Then shake up the yeast slurry to mix up the yeast and then split it up into 2-3 smaller jars. Then cold crash it so you can decant the new smaller jars before pitching or making a new yeast starter.

I hope this helps. Trying to do too much at once (work, training material and the forum). Cheers!
 
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