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Fermented garlic in honey?

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zahir.husein

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Infection is a relative term. Grain (so beer) is very susceptible to lactobacterial infection and lactic bacteria will compete with the yeast for the sugars in the grain and will produce lactic acids which will make your beer sour. There are also other bacteria and molds that love grain and are in the air and because your beer is at a relatively high pH (around 5.2) your wort and beer are party houses. Honey is not as inviting and it is not entirely obvious (to me, at least) that this fermentation is about mead making as much as it may be about the use of lacto-bacteria to ferment the honey. I am thinking that what the garlic bring to the table are these bacteria and so you are creating a lactic fermentation - in much the same way you might pickle cucumbers or cabbage by adding enough brine to prevent any mold or spoilage bacteria from thriving but which encourages lactic bacteria on the vegetables to multiply. I am thinking that the bacteria on the garlic multiply in the presence of honey at a concentration that inhibits or restricts other mold and other unpleasant bacteria that would otherwise "spoil" the honey in ways you and I would not like. The lacto-spoilage we do like almost as much as we love the way that yeast infect and spoil fruit.

Of course, I could be completely mistaken but I suspect this has nothing to do with alcoholic fermentation...
Does fermented garlic and honey produce alcohol
 

bernardsmith

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Hi zahir.husein and welcome.
I don't know that garlic has enough (or any) simple sugars to allow the yeast to ferment it* but honey will ferment 100% (or as near as) to ethanol... Fermented honey - and you need to dilute the honey so that around 1.5 K is dissolved in water to make about 4 L of solution for the concentration of sugar to be such that the yeast can easily transport the honey through their cell walls. Lower concentrations work better but higher concentrations work too although you really need to know what you are doing and you really need to have on hand the yeast that can handle that kind of syrup - is called mead and mead was perhaps one of the earliest wines ever drunk in human history (all you need is a hive that has been drenched by rain or flooded by river water and the honey will self ferment because it is so full of yeast carried by the bees to their hives (but under normal conditions the honey is just too lacking moisture to ferment).
* I can see how you can enable lactic bacteria to grow and "pickle" honey but that kind of fermentation does not result in alcohol but in the production of lactic acid.
 

Frusty

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@LuukGx I'm wondering how you would tell if there is a problem with this stuff. I have a batch of garlic-fermented honey that's about 2 years old and still smells and tastes great. Is there reason for concern?
 

Miraculix

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@LuukGx I'm wondering how you would tell if there is a problem with this stuff. I have a batch of garlic-fermented honey that's about 2 years old and still smells and tastes great. Is there reason for concern?
No Problem!
 

Miraculix

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Thanks. It's like that with almost all fermented foods. If it looks wrong (mold for example) or smells wrong (like vomit or other unpleasant smell), don't eat it.
 
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