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dry malt versatility?

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Mk010101

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I was thinking about how one could use mostly light DME in most brews and use extract grains for color and flavor. However I do have a few questions which pertains to "converting" recipes found here and elsewhere.

First, if a recipe calls for 3 lbs light DME and 3 lbs. amber DME, what "extra" specialty grain should be used if I wanted to go with 6 lbs of light DME? Is that "conversion" even possible?

What about munich LME? Is there a way to come close to that flavor with DME and specialty grains?

Is there a website or book with this type of conversions? Sometimes it seems buying in bulk (whether LME or DME) is a great money saver, but only if it is very versatile. 55lbs of DME would last a year, but I don't want to brew only a few certain types of beers. Would be nice to have a little variety.

Thanks for any help.
 

simzy

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Crystal malt comes anywhere from 10L-120L ( "L" stands for Lovibond, a measure of color). The higher the number the darker the color.
 

Orfy

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I'd use either a piece of software like brewsmith or an on line calculator like recipator and dial in the ingredients till you have the colour.

Depending on whether you need taste or colour and if you mini mash or just steep you should probably stock a mid range crystal malt 60l some chocolate malt and some black patent malt.

With that you could get any colour you want and play around with different taste profiles.
 

mbreen01

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Most standard extracts use a 2-row malt that is roasted to varying degrees, lending to a darker color with longer roasts. As far as Munich based extract, there's no substitute for munich malt with pale malt. So if, for example, you're making a bock, the final product will taste different with munich extract vs. pale extract.

Marc.
 
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