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Dandelion Mead: Has anyone ever tried this?

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Aviciouswind

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Just curious if anyone has ever tried making Dandelion Mead. I considered doing Yooperbrew's Dandelion Wine, but I'm a bigger fan of mead.

I couldn't find a recipe here, but found one on this site, and I'm wondering what other people think. I love experimenting, so hit me with any opinions!

Thanks for the help!

-Vicious
 

MarshmallowBlue

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Why do you heat your honey Meadist? WVMJ
Ope, here we go!

I thought he added it on the way down in temp (maybe I'm imagining things). I cant imagine much aroma is cooked off; especially after you add the honey, the temp will drop even more. Similar to adding steeping grains when the water temp is 160 or so, the temp will drop 10-15 degrees like that.

I don't think any damage has come at simmering temps.
 

WVMJ

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Friend, cant learn if you cant ask questions? Maybe Meadist (cool moniker) has found a secret to not blowing off the delicate flavors in the honey by heating it in a special way? I have seen people steep dandelions in boiling water, let it set a couple of days and then boil it again and claim it makes an excellent dandelion wine. I cant figure out how boiling it 2 times makes it better but its said to be very good though they dont seem to know why they boil it twice. WVMJ
 

meadist

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Thanks for the inquiry WVMJ. I've just found that this way has proven to be effective for me. I have tried several different ways/different temps - I have even made attempts at boiling the water *gasp. I like this technique because like Marshmallow rightly assumed, there's little aroma/delicate flavor loss, and it allows somebody without a thermometer (or a lazy person with) to easily add the honey to water at an appropriate temperature.
 

WVMJ

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Interesting, how can you tell there is no loss of aroma or flavor loss? What do you mean appropriate temperature, I have never heard that in meadmaking before that there was a target temp? Just to make sure I got your procedure, you boil the water for the flowers, turn off the heat and immediatly add your honey to water that was just boiling a moment ago? WVMJ

Thanks for the inquiry WVMJ. I've just found that this way has proven to be effective for me. I have tried several different ways/different temps - I have even made attempts at boiling the water *gasp. I like this technique because like Marshmallow rightly assumed, there's little aroma/delicate flavor loss, and it allows somebody without a thermometer (or a lazy person with) to easily add the honey to water at an appropriate temperature.
 

meadist

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WVMJ said:
Interesting, how can you tell there is no loss of aroma or flavor loss? What do you mean appropriate temperature, I have never heard that in meadmaking before that there was a target temp? Just to make sure I got your procedure, you boil the water for the flowers, turn off the heat and immediatly add your honey to water that was just boiling a moment ago? WVMJ
I am just basing this recipe on my experience... I boil water for the dandelion tea, wait for the rest to cool to a simmer, then add the honey, raisins and yeast nutrient. I find that the water at this temp dissolves the honey and nutrient very easily and breaks dorm the raisins a bit.

Let me know if you have some suggestions to improve the recipe.
 

Dan O

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Just curious if anyone has ever tried making Dandelion Mead.

I made a one gallon batch, but, according to what meadist does with his recipe, I didn't steep the dandelion nearly long enough. I get a slight hint of the dandelion, but, not as strong as I would've liked to have. Next spring, when the dandelions are plentiful, i will revamp my version and steep them for much longer. I like the idea of steeping for 2 days, stirring twice daily, (which is probably the way i will try it in the spring.)
 

Dan O

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I made a one gallon batch, but, according to what meadist does with his recipe, I didn't steep the dandelion nearly long enough. I get a slight hint of the dandelion, but, not as strong as I would've liked to have. Next spring, when the dandelions are plentiful, i will revamp my version and steep them for much longer. I like the idea of steeping for 2 days, stirring twice daily, (which is probably the way i will try it in the spring.)
 

bernardsmith

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Easiest way to prepare the petals is to cut them off the flower with scissors and not pluck 'em. You can freeze the petals (or the flowers) because it can be a struggle to obtain enough dandelions in one harvest to make a gallon BUT the end result is pretty incredible.
 
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