Cold break

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kmlavoy

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I'm recent all grain convert (just did my fourth one over the weekend). This is not really an all grain issue though.

My current setup is that I chill with an immersion chiller, then drain the kettle to a carboy. I love not having to pour. The thing is that about an inch of break material ends up on the bottom of my carboy. I brew with whole hops as a general rule. I had heard that whole flowers tend to latch on to that break material, but this doesn't really seem to be the case, whether I drain to the carboy or pour.

My idea was to maybe drain to my bottling bucket, let it settle for an hour or two, then drain it to the carboy and pitch. That would also have the benefit of giving me a way of knowing exaclty how much beer I made. Does anyone else do this? Or considered it and decided not to? What does everyone else do about break material?
 

Yooper

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Well, I "whirlpool" my cooled wort, and then siphon out the clear wort. When it gets lower in the pot, then I pick it up and strain the rest. (I don't have a ball valve on my kettle). It's not very high tech, but it works for me. Lots of people will give you better ideas on whirlpooling, or using a hopstopper in your kettle. I end up with some break material in my fermenter, and I've seen pictures of other people's fermenters with break material in it. It's even considered a nutrient for the yeast (it's only coagulated protein). It won't harm anything to go into your fermenter. Others may work harder to keep it out.

I just wanted to say DON'T let the wort sit out for a couple of hours after cooling, even in a sanitized bucket. You want to pitch the yeast as soon as it's cold and aerated.
 

BeerSmith

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I would suggest a pinch of Irish moss at the end of the boil if you are not doing that. You can watch the proteins and tannins coagulate and settle if you do this, and you will leave more trub in the boiler than fermenter.

I also would not leave your wort sitting around - pitch the yeast as soon as it cools and you can get it in the fermenter.

Cheers!
Brad
 

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