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Beginner Needs Advice (Mead Stopped Bubbling)

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Melvyn

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I recently started trying to brew mead (June 2nd),
I used 3 flasks of water (0,75l), into which I gave 165g/~0.35 pounds of honey each, as well as 6-8 raspberries, and added some common bakers yeast (just to give it a try before I move on to better yeasts).
It started bubbling an hour after I inserted the yeast, and continued to do so for a few days.
Yesterday it bubbled a bit less and today (June 6th) it stopped bubbling (almost) completely.

1) Why did it stop? Did I do something wrong, or is it just because of the low amount of liquid in general?
2) Does this mean it stopped fermenting?
3) Do I need to restart, or can I continue somehow?
 

Maylar

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Bubbles mean nothing. You need a hydrometer, a simple device that measures specific gravity. It's the #1 tool for any fermenting process. It'll tell you if your mead is done or not.

That said, .35 lbs of honey in 750 ml would give you about 1.061 starting gravity for potentially 8% ABV. It's possible that your ferment is finished, but only a hydrometer will tell you for sure.
 

Mellow Meads

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The bubbling from the initial fermentation shouldn't last much longer than a few days. It is possible your fermentation is "frozen;" I've never used bakers yeast, but for mead, even with wine and mead specific yeasts, you generally need to add some nutrients. Must made from honey, water and even some fruit doesn't provide enough of what the yeast need to keep going. You can find yeast nutrients at your local brewing store or even online. Although you could use a hydrometer to tell how much sugar is left, the amount you made is much too small to take an accurate reading. The best way to tell is taste. In pretty much all cases, yeast will almost completely dry out your mead; honey is a very simple sugar that yeast can easily ferment. If you taste any remaining sweetness, then your fermentation is not entirely complete. However, that's not necessarily a bad thing; a bit of sweetness can add to the overall character of the finished product. That said, if there are still sugars when you bottle, you're going to want to stabilize (chemically stop fermentation) with metabisulphite and potassium sorbate or else you could have a pretty gnarly bottle explosion. I would also highly recommend switching over to wine and beer yeasts as well since they are much more reliable and will result in better flavour and aroma profile.
 

Garrett312

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take your phone light to the back of your bottle to see if there is anything going on inside the bottle. Ie any tiny bubbles stuck to the sides or floating to the top.
if you have an air lock on your bottle (which you should and presume you do) it might not be producing enough gas's very fast with that small volume to give off regular burps.

only 2 things i can think of personally, best bet is to pick up a hydrometer or some nutrients and add 1/4 tsp of nutrient and see what it does the next day. Maybe energizer to, but thats up for debate from someone more experienced.
 
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