Beginner extract brewing howto

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ncbrewer

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If you have 5 gallons in a 6.5 gallon fermenter, are brewing a "normal" gravity beer (say 1.060 or less), and keep the beer temperature at mid 60's during active fermentation, you probably won't have blow-off. There is some disagreement about that - ymmv. But if you control temps so that at least a blow-off is rare, you can start off with the lid loose, with a 1 - 2 pound weight on it. That keeps microbes and fruit flies out, but prevents a violent blow-out that could involve kraeusen on the ceiling and walls. After about 5 days, seal the lid.
 

unionrdr

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I do that, but still seal it with an airlock. Haven't had a blow-off needed in a couple years. I chill the wort down to 75F or so, then strain into the fermenter. I top-off to recipe volume with spring water that's been chilling in the fridge a day or two before brew day. This gets the temp down to mid-60's Fahrenheit.
 

King_Coaster

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Ok, so I went to the store where I bought the Brewhouse Cervesa and the guy there said that the amount of yeast in the kit is near double what I need, hence the insane amount of quick fermentation activity then nothing. I put it into secondary yesterday and it looks fine to me, it is pretty cloudy but I expect that that will take care of itself in the next 2 weeks. There was no nastiness or floaties in the pail so I think I'm just a paranoid first timer...

I probably didn't help my cause by brewing 2 different brands and totally different types of beer at the same time and expecting them to act the same.

Thx
 

coldbrewnoob

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Well, I'm a noob too so bare with me. The process for them is the same but with a Partial Mash you are actually using base grains to convert starches to sugars just like an All Grain method but are using a smaller bill of gains and using less extract to makeup the rest of the wort.

Specialty grains do not contribute to the fermentable sugars but instead infuse color, flavor and aroma.

Please anyone jump in if I'm confused (which is likely).
I think specialty grains do contribut to the fermentable sugar although, not as much as base grain. Based on calculations from beer calculators
 

brewprint

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I think specialty grains do contribut to the fermentable sugar although, not as much as base grain. Based on calculations from beer calculators
It's a guarantee that they contribute but hardly any. At most there's a couple pounds usually steeped and only mashed for 20-30 minutes. Steeping is done at mash temps (150-160).
 

rich5665

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I did't see is mentioned in the instructions. It might be a good idea to give a basic idea of how much water to start with. Briess recommends starting with 3-4 gallons of water. After the wort is all brewed up and cooled and transferred to the fermenter, the brewer then tops off the wort with more water to the desired amount. In my case I brew small batches, I only have 5 gallon fermenters. So 3 to 3.5 gallons would be a starting point for me. Then after all the brewing is done I'd bring the level to more or less 4 gallons, then pitch my yeast.
 

Shadow4280

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so as far as i understand it, the simplest brew would be a can of extract and yeast? no need to boil or have a wart chiller?
 

rich5665

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so as far as i understand it, the simplest brew would be a can of extract and yeast? no need to boil or have a wart chiller?
There is a video on YouTube of someone doing exactly that. 2 gallon jug of spring water add the extract shake to mix, the add yeast. A balloon with a pin hole is placed offer the opening to prevent infection and allows carbon dioxide to escape.
 

Radek1980

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STEP 1: Mix

Mix lager Extract and Light Malt or 1 kg of sugar in 2 litres of hot water.

Add cool water to the 23 litre mark and stir vigorously.

Sprinkle yeast on the surface and fit the lid.

Ferment at 20C or less.



STEP 2: Brew

We recommend pitching Lager yeast at 22C-24C then allowing the brew to drop to as low as 13C over the next day or so.

Some physical differences when fermenting with Lager yeast:

•Less foam and barely noticeable scum ring.

•Less CO2 produced and longer ferment time.

•Ferments more thoroughly - Lower FG achieved.

•May produce an eggy smell (this will dissipate with bottle age).

Due to lower temperature and longer ferment time cleanliness and sanitation is even more important when making Lager beer.

Fermentation may take 2 to 3 weeks.

To avoid the risk of overcarbonation - glass bottles may explode. Only bottle your brew when the fermentation process is complete. Fermentation is complete when the density of the brew remains constant over 2 days.

We recommend the use of a hydrometer to check the specific gravity (density) of your brew.



STEP 3: Bottle

We recommend the use of PET bottles or reusable glass bottles designed for storing beer.

Bottles need to be primed so that secondary fermentation (producing the gas in the bottle) can take place

Priming

Add carbonation drops at the rate of 1 per 330ml/375ml bottle and 2 per 740ml/750ml bottle. Sugar or dextrose may be used at the rate of 8g per litre (approximately 6g of sugar to a level metric teaspoon).

Store the bottles out of direct sunlight at 18C or above for at least 1 week while secondary fermentation occurs. Your beer can be consumed after 2 weeks.

Bottles may be stored (conditioned) for long periods of time (3 months or more). Conditioning should improve flavour, reduce the size of the bubbles and make the yeast sediment more compacted.



STEP 4: Enjoy!

While we recommend leaving your bottles to condition at or above 18C for at least 2 weeks - Lagers generally benefit from further conditioning. Any slight sulphur aroma should dissipate with further conditioning.

Lagers are usually served very cold and bright. Keep your bottles standing upright and pour the brew in the one motion leaving the sediment behind in the bottle.
 
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