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Beersmith 3 - Conflicting ABV numbers when estimated & actual OG numbers are the same.

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yorkeken

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Looking for some help here. The attached image shows the "Est ABV" (on the left) as 6.8% based on the "Est OG" of 1.068. When I input 1.068 in the "Measured OG" field (on the right), it gives me a "Measured ABV" of 7.7%. Having a hard time figuring out what is causing the difference. Thanks.


Screen Shot 2020-11-14 at 10.33.54 AM.png
 

Coastalbrew

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What was your measured final gravity? If that was different than the estimated FG that would explain the difference. Either way I wouldn't sweat it. Calculators provide estimates only and the only numbers that really matter are what you measure in the actual brew.

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VikeMan

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Your estimated OG was 1.068 and estimated FG was 1.016. That computes to 6.8% ABV.

You actual OG was 1.068 and "measured" ABV was 7.7%. That implies that somewhere there was an "actual" FG entered (or assumed) of approximately 1.009. Either that, or the display makes no sense. (I'm not a BeerSmith user.)
 

Qhrumphf

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BeerSmith tends to auto-fill some fields with junk values. I think measured FG is one of em (been a while since I've looked). As said you probably entered actual OG and it calculated by the actual FG it had in there already.
 

kevin58

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That "measured" number is meaningless until after you make the beer and fill in the actual number.
 

Erik the Anglophile

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I have a similare question, still pretty new but have 4-5 brews behind me, and have noticed that beersmith pretty consistentently estimates the FG assuming the yeast will attenuate at it's maximum capacity, wich is rarely the case. Should I account for this by assuming a slightly higher FG than estimated and simply make the recipes a little bit "stronger" than I actually want them?
 

VikeMan

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I have a similare question, still pretty new but have 4-5 brews behind me, and have noticed that beersmith pretty consistentently estimates the FG assuming the yeast will attenuate at it's maximum capacity, wich is rarely the case.
BeerSmith considers yeast strain, mash length, and mash temperature when predicting attenuation. It does not consider grain bill composition, which is also an important factor. Sadly, most programs do not consider the grain bill.

Should I account for this by assuming a slightly higher FG than estimated and simply make the recipes a little bit "stronger" than I actually want them?
The problem with that approach is that there will also be recipes (with highly attenuable grain bills) where BeerSmith will estimate the attenuation low (FG high). But it could work for you if your grain bills tend to be on the less attenuable side.
 

Erik the Anglophile

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BeerSmith considers yeast strain, mash length, and mash temperature when predicting attenuation. It does not consider grain bill composition, which is also an important factor. Sadly, most programs do not consider the grain bill.



The problem with that approach is that there will also be recipes (with highly attenuable grain bills) where BeerSmith will estimate the attenuation low (FG high). But it could work for you if your grain bills tend to be on the less attenuable side.
Hmm. Guess I'll trust the predicted FG in pale ales and the likes,where I use mostly basemalts, and overshoot a little in more specialty malt heavy recipes.
 
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