Any else brew Grantham English Mild?

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RCope

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I brewed it in January. My first Dark Mild. Had a lot of flavor for a 4% abv beer. Like a stout "lite". My friends enjoyed it as well.
 

DBhomebrew

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Yep, it was one of my first all-grain beers. I brewed it to the recipe that time and enjoyed it very much in a "Wow, I brewed this!" kind of way.

More so when I brewed it a few months and a dozen other batches later. Added 5% homemade invert #2, a 5min dose of EKG, and sodium @ ~30ppm. This batch had more life to it.

After that one, I brewed the mild in Alworth's book. MO, 6% crystal 60, 5% black. Next time I brew a mile it'll be more in line with Weikert's Grantham.
 

DBhomebrew

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He's got a few tips in the companion article about getting too porter-like. Reducing crystal, adding black patent, etc. I liked what the invert did.

 

rmr9

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I’m glad to read some of this feedback on the recipe. This was on my “to brew” list for late summer/early fall. I’m intrigued by the chocolate rye as I’ve never used that malt before, but I can see how the proportions of chocolate rye and brown malt can push it towards a porter-like state. Tobor, any thoughts on a better dark mild recipe?
 

DBhomebrew

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I’m glad to read some of this feedback on the recipe. This was on my “to brew” list for late summer/early fall. I’m intrigued by the chocolate rye as I’ve never used that malt before, but I can see how the proportions of chocolate rye and brown malt can push it towards a porter-like state. Tobor, any thoughts on a better dark mild recipe?
I use the Weyermann chocolate rye everywhere in lieu of chocolate. Big fan. Not overpowering at all, very low bitterness due to no husk, just a touch of spice.

I think it's the brown malt in this recipe that really pushes the porter impression. It's easy to adjust a heavy mouthfeel by changing mash temp/length, grist proportions, etc., but there's no getting around that brown malt flavor.

One thing to note when looking at any of the Weikert recipes is that he's hitting the style with BJCP as his guide. I've enjoyed each of his beers that I've brewed, but for authenticity there are much better sources.

This is one ongoing conversation...

 
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Tobor_8thMan

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IMO, this is a good British Mild.

 

cyberbackpacker

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any thoughts on a better dark mild recipe?
This is a good (and popular) one to start with:

Orfy's Mild

It is from an OG member who lives in the area of the UK where this style was really embraced-- so someone in theory who has a bit better idea of what an "authentic" one should really taste like.

Also, check out the Shut Up About Barclay Perkins blog if you have not already done so. @patto1ro Ron Pattinson is a beer historian who has written numerous books on British brewing from primary documents (i.e. brewer's logs, etc).

Ron would tell you though that most (all?) Dark Milds came from the use of brewer's caramel to achieve the desired color, and not so much the use of dark malts.
 

rmr9

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I’ve got both of those books on my shelf! I like the Wheeler book, I keep saying I need to just try the recipe straight up. I’ve used some for inspiration but never as they are. I enjoy that classic styles series that Mild Ale is part of, even if the recipe sections are dated sometimes. They’re fun reads.
 

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