An Economical recipe

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siso80

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I am trying to tailor my first all grain recipe ( in the last 5 years) to work around buying in 50lb bulk bags of grain so I broke the bag into 2 batches each yielding (in theory at least) 12 and a half gallons of beer. I am not sure about the hop quantities though, i am modifying a recipe i found for a sierra nevada clone. all ingredients are already purchased i just don't know about the right percentages, here is what i have so far:

for 12.5 gallons:

25 lbs of 2 row
3.25 lbs of crystal 40l
1 california ale yeast

.75 oz magnum 60min
.75 oz perle 30 min
2.5 oz cascade 10 min
7.5 oz cascade flameout

is that too much cascade, i dont want no Hop Devil just a medium hoppy, totally drinkable IPA,

I also ordered malt extract to make a starter of the Whitelabs yeast so I could split it between 2 carboys


thanks
-jeremy
 

weirdboy

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Assuming you mean their signature beer, Sierra Nevada is an American Pale Ale, not an IPA.

I haven't done the math yet, but looking at it, that seems very, very low IBUs for 12.5 gallons of anything remotely resembling a pale ale.

You have a lot of cascade, but it's all at the end of the boil so you won't isomerize as much of the alpha acids from those additions.


Also for a 12.5 gallon batch I'd throw in 2 packets of dry yeast. (Safale US-05)

EDIT: nevermind I missed the part about the starter and using the WL yeast.
 

carrotmalt

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yodalegomaster

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The way you have this recipe set up with all the late hops, it's not going to be bitter, but it is going to be grassy or vegital tasting. The Bitterness of an IPA also would balance or hide some of the vegital flavors. Ever had an Avery Maharajah that has a good up front bitterness and the massive late and dry hops you have in this recipe. Tastes very vegital to me. Some of the other Double IPA's also use this massive late hop method and the beer, turn's almost "hop sweet" (It's not traditional sugar sweetness but it's a very pleasant sweet hop flavor). hard to say what your going to get when you brew.
 

weirdboy

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I don't think it will be grassy unless he leaves the hops in there a pretty long time, like throughout fermentation and beyond.

Pliny and Hop Rod Rye both use massive amounts of hops like that and I don't get vegetal/grassy flavors from them. In fact the clone recipes for Pliny I've seen use as much as a pound of hops or more for a 5 gallon batch. I don't think 12 oz or so in a 12.5 gallon batch is much at all, and none of it is dry hops.
 

StAnthonyB

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I am trying to tailor my first all grain recipe ( in the last 5 years) to work around buying in 50lb bulk bags of grain so I broke the bag into 2 batches each yielding (in theory at least) 12 and a half gallons of beer. I am not sure about the hop quantities though, i am modifying a recipe i found for a sierra nevada clone. all ingredients are already purchased i just don't know about the right percentages, here is what i have so far:

for 12.5 gallons:

25 lbs of 2 row
3.25 lbs of crystal 40l
1 california ale yeast

.75 oz magnum 60min
.75 oz perle 30 min
2.5 oz cascade 10 min
7.5 oz cascade flameout

is that too much cascade, i dont want no Hop Devil just a medium hoppy, totally drinkable IPA,

I also ordered malt extract to make a starter of the Whitelabs yeast so I could split it between 2 carboys
I use the 55# sacks of malt. And, break it down into four 13.75# 10 or 12.5 gallon brews. A pound of crystal and amber malt split into 4oz each per batch does me well and a pound of Kent Goldings split into 4oz per batch seems to fit like a puzzle piece around this grist.

Adding a few ounces of wheat malt isn't inappropriate.

The 50# sack only reduces this to 12.5# per 10 gallons which is still plenty strong enough to be a quality beer. Once you get this recipe down you can amp it up a little whenever you feel neccessary.

You'll get a session strength brew that starts around 1.035-1.040 and finishes 1.008 to 1.010. That is... in and about 3.5% using a 75% attenuation yeast WLP006 or WLP022.


(Here, I am assuming 85% efficiency.)
 

yodalegomaster

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It's important to note that Pliney uses Hop Extract for the bittering addition to avoid the vegital flavors. I wouldn't assume that all production beers use only cone or pellet hops these days. Source BYO
 
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