Adding smokey flavor in secondary

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Next brew I'm planning on making a 5gal batch of a basic porter, then splitting it into 3 smaller vessels for secondary and adding a different flavor to each of them.

Container 1 - Rack onto cold pressed coffee
Container 2 - Rack onto Cacao nibs or bourbon smoked oak chips
Container 3 - Need your help!

I want to add a smokey flavor to the beer. Originally I was going to include a small amount of steeped peat smoke malt in the wort right at the start (I know there's mixed feelings about peat smoked...but I love strong peat flavor in whiskey). I've since decided I don't want the smokey flavor in all 3 containers.

What would be the best way to add a smokey flavor in secondary? I don't want to use liquid smoke.

Could I fill a hopsack with peat smoked malt and add it to secondary? Should I steep the grains and add the liquid to secondary?
 

thumpersk_a

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Preferred method is to mash smoked grain or steep smoked grain. If your against liquid smoke I'd say smoke some wood chips and put them in or a small boiled down mash of smoked grain maybe. Just a shot in the dark. I'd say next time to plan it into the mash or steep it in.
 
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Preferred method is to mash smoked grain or steep smoked grain. If your against liquid smoke I'd say smoke some wood chips and put them in or a small boiled down mash of smoked grain maybe. Just a shot in the dark. I'd say next time to plan it into the mash or steep it in.
Thanks thumpersk_a.

Just to clarify a few things...

I know the ideal is to mash them on brew day and add them into the boil, but like I stated before I'm trying to avoid the whole batch having a smokey flavor.

Because I plan on splitting the batch into 3 it means there would only be a tiny amount of peat smoked malt to mash/steep. Probably an ounce, to go into approx 1.5 gallons.

Researching numerous threads it seems that if you're using a small amount of peat smoked malt it's ok to just steep instead of mash. It won't convert the starches into sugar, but it will impart the smokey flavor. Because the starches don't convert my theory is it would be ok to add into secondary as it won't affect the gravity or require further fermentation.

Solid theory, or am I missing something basic?
 

porterpounder

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Depending on steeping temp the smoked malt may self-convert. Beech wood smoked malt will self-covert at mash temps, not sure if peated malt will. If you steep peated malt then add the liquid to secondary you will dilute the gravity as you will basically just be adding water to the finished beer. If you like the peat character of whisky, then how about just adding a bit of really peaty scotch to the batch to taste? No dilution and how can adding scotch whisky to beer possibly go wrong?
 

SquidPope

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I'd say steep the peat-smoked malt (or even do a small mash of it, why not?), boil it, and add the boiled liquid carefully to your secondary.

By the way, if you're still trying to figure out how much peat-smoked malt to use, I have some very recent experience to share. I made a 2-gal batch of peat-smoked porter, with 1/4 lb of peat smoked malt (out of 2 lbs grain total, with extract making the rest of my gravity).

The very first bottle tasted like cigarettes, but the entire rest of the batch has had a pleasantly smoky undertone. I'm actually planning to increase the peat malt slightly in the next batch, and just let it age an extra week before refrigerating.
 

kingwood-kid

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Smoky and Spicy: Get some dried chile peppers (they're typically smoke-dried) at your local Hispanic grocery store. Remove the seeds and membranes and steep for a few days.
 
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