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agroff383

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Hey all, planning my boil on Sunday. I got a kit from Homebrewers Outpost and it says the following on the instruction sheet, which I wasn't sure about:

1. It says do not re hydrate the dry yeast even if it says to on the package of yeast.

So do I just dump the packet of yeast right in the fermenter after I cool the wort?

2. Bittering hops add to a muslin bag and throw in to the boil for 60 minutes.

So the hops aren't loose in the boil? My other brewing book seemed to allude to the fact that the hops are loose in the wort.

3. Specialty grains should be added before the heat is turned on and taken out right before the boil.

Should I keep the heat low and let the grains simmer or steep for a prescribed amount of time? Or just put the grains in when I turn the heat on and then take them out before it is going to boil?

Thanks I appreciate the help.....I can't wait!
 

TheTower

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1. that works just fine

2. you can do either, I personally let them free

3. this is where I use the grain bag. you should aim to steep them in about 150 degree water for 20-30 mins, remove the grains, bring to a boil and go with the extract. I've heard of people putting the grains in at the start and removing them when the water hit about 160. Just make sure you don't boil specialty grains, really you shouldn't go above 170 with them.
 

thedailyaustin

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1) I've always rehydrated my dry yeast and its always worked well. You don't have to but if you are sanitary I don't think it can hurt.

2) You can toss the hops straight in or you can use a bag. I just toss them in and strain them out when I'm moving to my primary.

3) When I do extract I'll usually steep the grains for about 30 minutes around 150ish. Alternately, you can toss them in before you start heating your water and then take them out when it gets to about 170.
 
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1) just sprinkle the dry yeast into the fermenter after adding you cooled wort and aerating(Shaking a ton)
2) You can do either, the muslin back makes siphoning out easier
3) Very basic brewing you can put them in, turn the heat on and when the owrt gets up to boiling remove them. Better brew will result is you set the temp to ~ 150 and hold there for 30 minutes. Then remove your grains start your 60 minute boil.
You start extract tannins that cause off flavors when going over 170* with your grains. These may or may not be notice depending on specific brew but is a good rule to follow.



*Darn you two
About rehydrating yeast. Rehydrating some dry yeast actually is worse for them than just dry pitching. I forget the exact reason but it can be found by searching.
 

TwoHeadsBrewing

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1. Yes, just pitch dry yeast into the carboy with the cooled wort.

2. You can do either. Be aware if they aren't in a bag you'll have to find some way of straining them out. You don't want them in the fermenter, although it wouldn't be the end of the world if you got some in there :D.

3. Steep grains for 30 minutes @ 155F. "tea bag" or strain the water from this process into the boil kettle. It's perfectly fine to throw them into cool water as you begin the boil, but you don't want them to burn on the bottom of the kettle or be in the kettle once the water gets above 180F.
 
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side note, temperature is not nearly as important when steeping for an extract batch as it is when mashing for an AG batch so don't stress out over temps. just keep it around 150-155 but UNDER 165-170
 

daveooph131

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Very new to this, in fact I will do my first brew tomorrow....But I've asked similar questions so for what it's worth.

1) I would rehydrate the yeast...You'll get the best strands this way.
2) Both ways work
3) Should put in water and let steep 20 minutes or so not exceeding 170 degrees
 

thedailyaustin

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*Darn you two
About rehydrating yeast. Rehydrating some dry yeast actually is worse for them than just dry pitching. I forget the exact reason but it can be found by searching.

I can't find any posts about that, but if you could point me in the right direction. I'd like to make sure I'm not gimping any of my dry yeast batches.
 

daveooph131

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Check out this thread

https://www.homebrewtalk.com/f39/controversy-110817/

If the link doesn't work go to page 2 of the begginer section and look for the post called "Controversy".

I put this up yesterday b/c of similar questions and all the responses seemed to point to rehydrating your yeast. There is a specif post that says "no matter what the instructions say - rehydrate"
 
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agroff383

agroff383

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Check out this thread

https://www.homebrewtalk.com/f39/controversy-110817/

If the link doesn't work go to page 2 of the begginer section and look for the post called "Controversy".

I put this up yesterday b/c of similar questions and all the responses seemed to point to rehydrating your yeast. There is a specif post that says "no matter what the instructions say - rehydrate"


Cool. Thanks for all the responses everyone....hopefully this goes well on Sunday, after these questions were answered I feel pretty confident. Thanks!
 

Fat Guy Brewing

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You have advice from people who have brewed lots and people who have brewed 0. You decide what would be best.

1. You can pitch the yeast dry.
2. You can throw hops straight into the brewpot or put them in a bag. Twoheads suggested straining before putting the wort in the fermenter. I personally pour the wort through a strainer, but others have been known to just dump the whole brewpot into the fermenter. It will all drop to the bottom eventually. When you dry hop, you are throwing hops directly into the secondary fermenter. It won't hurt a thing. You just have to try a couple of different ways and decide which you like best.
3. +1 to Twoheads. Heat the water to 150*, then put the bag of specialty grains in and hold that temp for 30 minutes. You get more out of the process that way. Dropping in a grain bag as soon as you turn on the heat, then removing before boil is just your home brew store's way of trying to make things as easy as possible. You get a better product doing it the other way.

Your more important question should be about fermentation. Search this site for info on that. I will just say this, if the store's instructions say to ferment for 3-5 days, then bottle, its wrong. That's a ploy to get you to brew quickly and come back and buy another kit. Primary fermentation is at least 1 week, preferably longer depending on the beer. Take your time, be patient, take gravity readings, and you will make a better beer.
 

BarleyWater

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I can't find any posts about that, but if you could point me in the right direction. I'd like to make sure I'm not gimping any of my dry yeast batches.

Every strain of yeast is going to have a different preferred temp and time to be proofed, if at all. If you use water that is too warm, even 5 degrees, it can severely decrease the cell count. Some yeasts like 85-90F for 15 minutes, some like 95-100 for 20 minutes. If you do the wrong thing it is worse than just tossing it in dry, of course just tossing in dry can cause some undue stress on the yeast. The best thing to do, is to PROPERLY rehydrate your dry yeast, according to the manufacturers instructions for each different strain, but if that's too much work, just toss it in dry and don't risk the cell damage.
 

KUbrew

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Looks like you've gotten lots of advice from people more experienced than me, however, I will say that I did ordered my equipment package and first 2 kits from them and had great success. I watched their instructional videos on their website and followed their instructions exactly and both kits turned out great. As for the "best" technique to use, I'll leave that debate up to the experts.
 

thedailyaustin

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Every strain of yeast is going to have a different preferred temp and time to be proofed, if at all. If you use water that is too warm, even 5 degrees, it can severely decrease the cell count. Some yeasts like 85-90F for 15 minutes, some like 95-100 for 20 minutes. If you do the wrong thing it is worse than just tossing it in dry, of course just tossing in dry can cause some undue stress on the yeast. The best thing to do, is to PROPERLY rehydrate your dry yeast, according to the manufacturers instructions for each different strain, but if that's too much work, just toss it in dry and don't risk the cell damage.

Yeah I agree there are optimal temps for rehydrating different strains, but I've never seen any evidence that some strains do worse with rehydrating properly than without rehydrating at all. I usually double pitch rehydrated dry yeast cause dry is so cheap anyways.
 

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