220v power supply wiring

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IceChisel

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Can a 220v AC -> ?v DC power supply be wired with L1, L2, G as opposed to L, N, G? Most if not all have connections labeled L, N, G. I believe in the 240v system the two 120v hot lines swap as being the hot or neutral 60 times a second?

As long as the power supply can take as input 220v, I know some have a switch that sets the input voltage.
 
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IceChisel

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Agreed but documentation is sparse with a lot of power supplies. Often times, in the US at least, the terms 220v and 240v are used interchangeably (especially with items coming from China) So my question was leaning more theoretical with a practical bent... if that's of any consolation.

Guess it's worth a smoke check.

 

RiverCityBrewer

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The listing says there is a switch for 120v/220v operation, though I don't see one in any picture there. It might say on the unit if it is auto sensing or not. The verbiage on the listing doesn't inspire confidence.
 
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IceChisel

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There is a switch inside the unit.

But can it handle 240v and is the 220v it claims to handle the same as the 240v I want it to handle? No documentation on the 240v because, from my understanding, European 220v has one line and one neutral though which is which is not known at any given time.

Theoretically the transformer in the power supply and the construction of the circuit should handle both the same.

Gets kinda confusing to be honest.
 
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RiverCityBrewer

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There is a switch inside the unit.

But can it handle 240v and is the 220v it claims to handle the same as the 240v I want it to handle? No documentation on the 240v because, from my understanding, European 220v has one line and one neutral though which is which is not known at any given time.

Theoretically the transformer in the power supply and the construction of the circuit should handle both the same.

Gets kinda confusing to be honest.
Yeah, the confusion is understandable with that unit... do you have a neutral available to play it safe? I'm going to go out on a limb and say a neutral is required for correct operation. Whatever you do, please connect the ground first.
 
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What is most odd to me is the label seems to say 120V 60Hz and 220V 50Hz... unless that is my poor eyesight?

I'll go on a limb and say it will probably work fine, though per @RiverCityBrewer's confidence comment... I agree. If I am powering something critical or sensitive, I'm probably picking a power supply that inspires more confidence.
 

ChrisThomas

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...No documentation on the 240v because, from my understanding, European 220v has one line and one neutral though which is which is not known at any given time...
I'm not sure if this is going to help? UK electrical supply is very clear which is Live (hot as you colonists apparently call it) and which is Neutral. The Neutral line is related to Earth, usually tied together in local electrical distribution centre. Earth is more locally connected to, well (The) Earth.

A quick look at the product details looks like you'll have to remove the cover to select the input voltage range.
 
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IceChisel

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Agreed but take a European 220v hot and connect it to the neutral on the power supply and take the European neutral and connect it to the hot on the power supply. Should still work right?

Same with the US 240v hot 1 to PS hot and US 240v hot 2 to PS neutral. Should still work right?

Same with US 120v hot to PS neutral and US 120v neutral to PS hot. Should still work right?

All of this because these are switching PS? So why are the PS labeled with line, neutral and ground if only ground matters?

There either is a correct polarity on these switching supplies or there isn't.
 

etk29321

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Europe runs on 240v/50hz. Most dc power supplies for electronics these days take 120v/60hz (US standard) or 240v/50hz(EU standard) just so they have one part they can use globally. The hertz is important when you’re talking AC/DC conversion. The values of the capacitors and such in the supply were optimized for 50hz. I wouldn’t assume it will work. It may, it may not. It also may work but give you dirty power. Depends on the exact innards of the unit.
 

ChrisThomas

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Agreed but take a European 220v hot and connect it to the neutral on the power supply and take the European neutral and connect it to the hot on the power supply. Should still work right?

Same with the US 240v hot 1 to PS hot and US 240v hot 2 to PS neutral. Should still work right?

Same with US 120v hot to PS neutral and US 120v neutral to PS hot. Should still work right?

All of this because these are switching PS? So why are the PS labeled with line, neutral and ground if only ground matters?

There either is a correct polarity on these switching supplies or there isn't.
Technically I would think that for this type of equipment there should be no problem with swapping the L and N. HOWEVER, this is based on the assumption that the input is COMPLETELY isolated from the output. If the input N is connected to the output 0V (not uncommon in older days) then your output could have a mains level offset. Hopefully it's the input E thats connected to 0V?
 

jdonovan

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So voltage across the pond used to be 220V in the UK, and 240 on the continent. In the early 2000's it was changed to 230v on both sides of the channel.

Most of the places that people think of as '220v' are really 230v, there are a few countries that are 240v, an interesting one is Australia which has 2 states I believe at a true 240v, and the others at 230.

Most power supplies that are multi voltage will work 100-250v, if they have 2 ranges it is usually 100-127, 208-250.

Also there are very few countries with split-phase power like the US, where you use 2 hot, or line conductors out of phase to get the higher voltage. Many devices intended for international use labeled L-N-G will deal with US power's L-L-G, but the reverse is not true, especially where the US device has some 120v needs, and will try to obtain that power by getting it from one phase to neutral.
 
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IceChisel

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Now if only the documentation for power supplies included specific country and wiring compatibility tables like:

US - 240V - L1, L2, G
US - 240V - L1, L2, N, G
US - 120V - L, N, G
EUR - 230V - L, N, G
AUS - 230V - L, N, G
AUS - 240V - L, N, G
etc...

or perhaps that would be too big of a list... in addition to things like 3 phase etc...
 
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