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Old 06-14-2008, 03:29 PM   #1
Meister Rivington
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Default Pilsner Fermentation

My buddy and I brewed a batch of pils yesterday and we are using White Labs San Francisco Lager Yeast WLP810. It says it can stand temperatures up to 65 degrees, but it also says I should maintain 70 until fermentation starts.

So, before bed bubbling had started (not super fast, but it had started) so I moved it to another room which is around 65. In the morning there was no bubbling at all.

Should I give it more time? Try to find a cooler place? Move it back to 70 until it starts bubbling alot?

Thanks


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Old 06-14-2008, 03:52 PM   #2
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I would just leave it at 65 degrees or under- bubbling (or not bubbling) is not always a sign of fermentation. I like that yeast, and use it often. It does well in cooler temperatures.


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Old 06-15-2008, 07:36 PM   #3
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And I'll mention it again. You should make a starter with all liquid yeast, and especially for a lager which needs the higher amount of yeast to attenuate a lager right.
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Old 06-15-2008, 08:39 PM   #4
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Well, it is bubbling away now. I can't get the fermentation area below 65, but it does sit right around 65-66. Will this be an issue?

Will I have to do a diacetyl rest? If so, what temp should I allow it to rise to?
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Old 06-16-2008, 01:49 PM   #5
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Default Diacetyl Rest

If I fermented in primary for 1 week and moved to secondary for another week (at 70 or so degrees), would that be good to remove the diacetyl?
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Old 06-16-2008, 02:40 PM   #6
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Diacetyl is best cleaned up while still on the yeast cake- since it's a function of the yeast. Still, leaving it for a long time will do the trick anyway. I think 70 is too warm for that yeast, personally. You'll probably like it better in the 60-65 degree range.

Usually when I use that yeast, I ferment for a couple of weeks at 60ish, and then lower the temperature to the high 50s and leave it. Next time, don't be in a hurry to rack, since it's the yeast that clean up the diacetyl and other off-flavors.
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Old 06-17-2008, 02:02 PM   #7
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I didn't rack yet, so no problem. I will leave at 65 for 10 days. I will then move to secondary for another 4 days to clear it up a bit.

I don't understand why you make it colder at the end. If there was diacetyl, wouldn't I want to raise the temperature instead?

With this yeast, I should maintain the 65 temp consistently? Even when I can keg conditioning?

Thanks
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Old 07-19-2012, 11:02 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Meister Rivington View Post
I didn't rack yet, so no problem. I will leave at 65 for 10 days. I will then move to secondary for another 4 days to clear it up a bit.

I don't understand why you make it colder at the end. If there was diacetyl, wouldn't I want to raise the temperature instead?

With this yeast, I should maintain the 65 temp consistently? Even when I can keg conditioning?

Thanks
From what I know, your only dropping it down to the lower temperature to drop some yeast out and clear up the beer. That is why I cold crash my beers. I would have to look at Brewing Classic Recipe book to tell you more info. Not on me right now.
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Old 07-19-2012, 11:26 PM   #9
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at 65 fermentation should be done within a couple days, leaving it beyond those couple days will help clear up byproducts including diacetyl. lowering the temp to the 50's will drop some of the yeast out of solution and essentially is a brief lagering period, further cleaning up the beer.

you don't want to rack or lower the temp until the diacetyl is cleaned up. there really isn't much point in going to secondary for 4 days IMO - give it 2 weeks + in primary and if you have the ability either drop the temp to the 50s to lager for a bit or low 30's to cold crash


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