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Old 10-07-2012, 11:21 PM   #1
SnupDave
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Default Alternatives to cold crashing?

So, I'm new to brewing, and have been reading a lot here on HBT, and am in the process of reading "Strong Waters" by Scott Mansfield. I don't actually have sufficient equipment to actually brew anything at home yet, I am notably missing a temperature controlled fermenting chest or beer-specific refrigerator.
As I was reading about some of the fining agents, and how they do what they do, it occurred to me that Isinglass (which supposedly removes yeast from the wort) could be used as an alternative to cold crashing (which is used to make the yeast stop actively fermenting).

My question is, is anything I've said so far wrong? If so, what? I certainly don't mean to be stating anything as fact, I just want to try to think outside of the box and discuss things to reach a fuller understanding of how this all works. Any information about this process would be helpful.


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Old 10-08-2012, 12:16 AM   #2
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I must say my first response was going to be a smart a remark. However, I would say a couple of things in response. The first is that you can stop fermentation with other means, racking ( removing the wort from the bulk of the yeast) may or may not work depending on yeast population, adding campden tabs ( basically killing off yeat cells), and finally the smart a remark freeze crash, just put it in the freezer.

Why i stopped and replied to your question? Do not let equipment stop you from brewing. You can researh a vast amount of information from alot of very smart folks (here an else where) that will explain everything from basic brewing to getting by with whatever you can find. Check out the Wiki section and keep reading. When you need help you'll find a bunch of people here to help, good luck and plz just start f****** brewing. You'll be happy you did


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Old 10-08-2012, 04:02 AM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by liquiditynerd
Check out the Wiki section and keep reading. When you need help you'll find a bunch of people here to help, good luck and plz just start f****** brewing. You'll be happy you did
+1. No matter how much you research, you're going to be frazzled and fearing you screwed up your first batch, whether its extract or all grain. Get up on that horse and ride!
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Old 10-08-2012, 04:11 AM   #4
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It was my understanding that campden tablets prevented yeast from fermenting by raising the pH, but as it slowly worked its way back down to status quo (a process that I don't quite understand, how could *anything* be changing in there if there's no active fermentation? What's the driving force behind the change?) then the yeast can begin doing their thing again.

I figure being patient BEFORE I brew will set a good precedent so that I can be patient WHILE I brew, as well. That's the theory, anyway.
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Old 10-08-2012, 10:57 AM   #5
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Why do you want the yeast to stop fermenting? I let my brews have time enough in the fermenter that the yeast stop because they have nothing left to ferment. When the ferment it over, the excess yeast settles out and the beer clears up on its own. Time is your friend, not your enemy (except for the first batch when you want to start drinking your own beer way before it is ready to drink). I can have very clear beer without adding anything to it.
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Old 10-08-2012, 11:01 AM   #6
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You really only need the temperature controlled refrigerator if you insist on making lagers. Ales can be made without any refrigeration or perhaps rudimentary cooling in the hot months. Most ales should ferment just fine in the low to mid 60F range and that temp only needs to be maintained for a few days before they can be warmed to room temp (72F?).
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Old 10-08-2012, 03:39 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RM-MN View Post
Why do you want the yeast to stop fermenting?
I'm not planning on doing this on a regular basis, or anything. But cold crashing is something that people do, on occasion. It's just one of the many techniques used by people who know what they're doing to manipulate the final product.

I'd like to know how to be similarly in control of that final product. I'd like to understand as many options as possible. I'd like as many avenues open to me as possible, to give me access to a wide range of possible solutions for potential problems.

I obviously have nothing against fermentation, it's just that I want to know what effects different things have.
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Old 10-08-2012, 05:51 PM   #8
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cold crashing doesn't alter/manipulate the final product, it just helps speed up the process of clearing the beer and dropping yeast and anything else in suspension - time will do the same thing with the only difference being more sediment in the bottle or keg

you don't want to stop the yeast from fermenting prematurely aside from some cases of ciders etc where you want to retain more residual sweetness

even after the yeast quit consuming sugars they are cleaning up after themselves

cold crashing is done right before packaging well after fermentation is done
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Old 10-08-2012, 08:14 PM   #9
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just start f****** brewing. You'll be happy you did - should be someone's signature for sure.
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Old 10-08-2012, 08:43 PM   #10
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Bottle the beer, let it carb up at room temperature and then put the bottles in the fridge for a week or two. That will effectively 'cold crash' them.

Ryan


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