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Old 08-31-2012, 04:41 AM   #1
whiteheadcraftbeers
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May 2012
Toledo, OH
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Hey y'all, I'm wanting to use ground coffee beans in a secondary fermenter and I was just wondering if anyone had any input on how to do this and keep everything sanitary. I just don't want to screw up 10 gallons of brew by doing this the wrong way. Thanks in advance for any advice! Cheers

 
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Old 08-31-2012, 12:13 PM   #2
libeerty
 
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Jul 2012
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My advice is to brew a very strong coffee and to add that. If you just add the grounds, you'll be drinking them with every pint. I cold brewed coffee and added it to my secondary, strained and everything, and still had a few grounds.
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Old 08-31-2012, 03:59 PM   #3
whiteheadcraftbeers
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May 2012
Toledo, OH
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Well I had planned on putting the coffee in a muslin bag and just cracking the beans, so I guess I don't plan using "ground" coffee. I'm not looking for brewed coffee flavor, I just want a slight coffee essence. Thanks for the advice though.

 
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Old 08-31-2012, 04:06 PM   #4
TheZymurgist
 
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Are you an AHA member? There's a great article on the subject in this months issue of Zymurgy.

If you use ground, rather than cracked or crushed, you won't need to use as much, but you might have to deal with leaving grounds behind. It seems a lot of people make a toddy (cold brewed coffee) and just add that to the secondary. You could hot-brew the coffee, too, or just add the beans directly. If you're worried about sanitation, boil some water, put the beans in your muslin bag, and drop the bag in the water for a minute. I don't think it's necessary, but this will kill anything on the outside of the beans.

 
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Old 08-31-2012, 04:12 PM   #5
Brandonovich
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Jan 2011
Fort Worth, Texas
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One of the main advantages to adding coffee rather than grounds is that you have much more control of how much coffee flavor gets into your beer. Cold brew some very strong coffee, and then take a measured amount of beer - say ten ounces to make the math easy - and add coffee to it until it tastes the way you want. Do the math from there and you will know exactly how much coffe to add. There is no reason to let it sit in the secondary either, just add it at bottling or kegging. I have done this before with great results.

 
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Old 08-31-2012, 04:14 PM   #6
deepsouth
 
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i cold brewed coffee in a steralized mason jar and added it directly to the beer, in secondary. i used a quart size mason jar about 1/3 full of ground coffee and filled with sterile water and shook it everytime i walked by the refrigerator. i did that for a couple days and then used a french press to separate the grounds from the coffee.

actually, here are my notes.....

i cold brewed (36 hours) about 5.5 cups of water with about 7 ounces of coarsely crushed super fresh mockhorn island shade tree coffee, bird friendly and whatnot, etc... yield was 32 ounces of pure coffee goodness. total yield was just under 5 gallons after losing over a gallon through the blow-off tube.

 
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Old 09-02-2012, 02:03 AM   #7
whiteheadcraftbeers
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May 2012
Toledo, OH
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Thank you all for the reply's, I'd say I have a good base to go off of now. I think I am still going to use beans but maybe down the road I'll use brewed coffee instead. Thanks again for the input. Cheers

 
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Old 09-05-2012, 05:59 AM   #8
MrBrewEsq
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May 2012
Auburn, Washington
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OMG!! LOL … I tried making a coffee porter once. I put 1# Starbuck whole beans, coarse ground in a hop bag and steeped it in the boil pot for 10 minutes after at the end of the boil of a 10 gallon batch. After fermentation and bottling, I let it set for a month and opened the first bottle. It was like this coffee hand leapt out of the bottle and grabbed me by the nose. 2 month later, same thing. 2 more months, tempered but still pretty strong. 8 months after I brewed it, the coffee porter had matured into a taste beer. My advice to anyone interested in using coffee in a brew is to go easy, a little bit goes a long way.
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Old 09-05-2012, 06:09 AM   #9
McGlothan
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Feb 2012
Carbondale, CO
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What about just adding toddy to your beer and mixing on bottling day?

 
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Old 09-05-2012, 06:10 AM   #10
McGlothan
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Feb 2012
Carbondale, CO
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Brandonovich View Post
One of the main advantages to adding coffee rather than grounds is that you have much more control of how much coffee flavor gets into your beer. Cold brew some very strong coffee, and then take a measured amount of beer - say ten ounces to make the math easy - and add coffee to it until it tastes the way you want. Do the math from there and you will know exactly how much coffe to add. There is no reason to let it sit in the secondary either, just add it at bottling or kegging. I have done this before with great results.
Sorry, already posted

 
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