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Old 12-16-2011, 04:40 PM   #1
BoundForBeer
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So I know everyone is going to say temp control should be thru out the whole primary fermentation. I was just wondering what peoples feelings are on how long it is REALLY necessary? Is one week ok then move out of temp control. My problem is im tryin to build up the pipeline quicker but only have room for 2 primary vessels in my temp control. Any thoughts would be helpful.

 
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Old 12-16-2011, 04:57 PM   #2
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It's only necessary for the first few hours of active fermentation. Since there's always the possibility of lag time, I recommend folks just maintain temp for the first week. After that you can let it warm up.

Yeast only produce the off flavors during high temps, when they are fermenting afterwards it's not crucial.

In fact letting the beer then warm up for a week or however long will help the yeast clean up those byprodcuts that lead to off flavors. In articles about diacetyl cleanup in ales, it just recommend letting the beer go to room temp for a week on the yeast.
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Old 12-16-2011, 05:02 PM   #3
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Yeah first couple days until things sort of die down, that's my experience.

 
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Old 12-16-2011, 05:10 PM   #4
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I use my temp control fermentation chamber for the first week of fermentation, then move my fermenter to an interior closet where it stays at about 70 degrees for about 2 more weeks after that.
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Old 12-16-2011, 05:11 PM   #5
bourgeoisbee
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Yeah, 72 hours from activity is probably fine; a week gives you more security. How much higher is the non-controlled area? You would probably be OK, but I wouldn't go over 70F, even after a week.

 
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Old 12-16-2011, 06:08 PM   #6
BoundForBeer
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yeah it would be in the basement so it would be in the mid sixties most the time. Thanks for all the feedback...now to get working!

 
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Old 12-16-2011, 06:47 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Revvy View Post
It's only necessary for the first few hours of active fermentation. Since there's always the possibility of lag time, I recommend folks just maintain temp for the first week. After that you can let it warm up.

Yeast only produce the off flavors during high temps, when they are fermenting afterwards it's not crucial.

In fact letting the beer then warm up for a week or however long will help the yeast clean up those byprodcuts that lead to off flavors. In articles about diacetyl cleanup in ales, it just recommend letting the beer go to room temp for a week on the yeast.
Not to hijack this thread, but let's say i do my initial fermentation at 68 degrees then I take it out of my chamber and bring it in to my house that is always a tad chilly in the winter say 65 or 64 ish will that stall or drop out whatever yeast are still working?

Thanks

 
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Old 12-16-2011, 07:03 PM   #8
RugenBrau
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a slight drop like that shouldnt kill off your yeast (Check the temp range) You fermentation might slow up a bit. Relax
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Old 12-16-2011, 07:04 PM   #9
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Quote:
Let's say i do my initial fermentation at 68 degrees then I take it out of my chamber and bring it in to my house that is always a tad chilly in the winter say 65 or 64 ish will that stall or drop out whatever yeast are still working?
A typical ale yeast for an average gravity beer can ferment down to about 58 F. Room/ambiant temp is always about 3-5 degrees cooler than the actual fermentation temp inside the fermenter, so a typical yeast would be good down to about 55 F or so.

All yeast have their optimal temps printed on the package or on the manufacturer's Web sites.

So to answer your question, the mid 60s would probably be just fine, but check the optimum temps of your particular yeast strand to be sure.
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Old 12-16-2011, 07:08 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RugenBrau View Post
a slight drop like that shouldnt kill off your yeast (Check the temp range) You fermentation might slow up a bit. Relax
Totally relaxed dood just asking a question, Ive got a small chamber that will only hold one carboy and I like the idea of freeing up the space and being able to brew more...


 
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