Did my high mash temp produce proteins? - Home Brew Forums
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Old 01-29-2011, 04:24 PM   #1
Chase22
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Jan 2011
Austin, TX
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So, first of all, I'd like to say that I tried searching the forum for a similar problem, but couldn't find anything related close enough to my situation.

I tried to make a Chimay clone partial mash for my second batch. I don't have a lauter tun and just tried to keep the pot temp stabilized long enough to steep the specialty grains. Well, that didn't work.

I ended up steeping for 30 min at around 160 F. I realize this isn't too high, but it is higher than recommended. My OG was also really high, 1.090. After a few weeks in the carboy it has dropped to 1.031. But when I chilled and tasted a little from a hydrometer reading, it had a lot of grain-of-sand-sized particles floating in it. I'm pretty sure it's not yeast, and my guess is they are proteins that were formed during the mash?

Should I just wait it out? It doesn't effect taste, aside from the fact that there is a very full mouth-feel (which I enjoy).



 
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Old 01-29-2011, 04:36 PM   #2
COLObrewer
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160 shouldn't be a problem, could be hot break or cold break or both (from the boil and chill) which is fine, it will feed your yeasties. I suppose it could be grain particles also depending on how you steeped.


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Old 01-29-2011, 04:39 PM   #3
COLObrewer
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Wait, a few weeks in the carboy? a few is seven right? Should be done fermenting by now.
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Old 01-29-2011, 05:05 PM   #4
jonmohno
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Higher mash temps can cause more unfermentables which would make a sweeter beer but that is kinda what beglians seem to be along with high carbonation. Its a big beer so its gonna take twice the time to ferment before botteling i wouldnt expect to drink it for at least another month or more. Ive noticed Midwest Supplies have updated and revised their kit instructions. How long did it say to primary/secondary this?
You can maintain mash temps on the stove it just requires your attention the whole time adjusting and pulling it. Ive though about using a small cooler or wrapping the pot in a ton of blankets.both will work if you want to set it and forget it.Just get it degree above your intended temp and prime a small cooler with hot water before hand.

 
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Old 01-29-2011, 05:41 PM   #5
Chase22
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Jan 2011
Austin, TX
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@colobrewer Actually, now that I look at my notes, it's only been in the carboy for 8 days. I'm probably just being impatient.

@jonmohno I got the recipe from the Clone Brews book. It said "Ferment in the primary fermenter 5-7 days or until fermentation slows, then siphon into the secondary fermenter. Bottle when fermentation is complete." But I'm not using a secondary. I do plan on waiting a month until bottling.

 
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Old 01-29-2011, 05:51 PM   #6
jonmohno
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Good plan. Patience is the hardest part. I botteled my first batch @ 10 days pitched too high a temp and am now just getting ok beers after 2 months.Its highly recommended to do 3 weeks + and watch your pitching temps and fermenting temps its a huge part of what makes the beer.

 
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Old 04-19-2011, 04:53 PM   #7
Toohey
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Apr 2011
Glendive, MT
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chase22 View Post
... But when I chilled and tasted a little from a hydrometer reading, it had a lot of grain-of-sand-sized particles floating in it. I'm pretty sure it's not yeast, and my guess is they are proteins that were formed during the mash?

Should I just wait it out? It doesn't effect taste, aside from the fact that there is a very full mouth-feel (which I enjoy).
I had that problem too. Now I am very new at this so I might not know what I am talking about, but I tried steeping at a lower temp, and a longer boil and all the sediment went directly to the bottom of the fermenter and my beer was pretty clear right away. Could it be the longer boil that breaks down the "floaters?" I am not sure.

Toohey



 
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