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Old 01-27-2011, 08:12 PM   #21
Indyking
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Originally Posted by -TH- View Post
Wow, what a difference. Even my beer that's 8+ weeks in bottles don't taste as good as 1 week in the keg. Maybe I had an issue with my bottling process who knows. I guess its just one more reason on top of many others that I'm sold on kegging. I absolutely love it - and I was a pretty die hard bottler.

Bottling equipment to be up for sale soon.
I have kegged one batch so far but I do plan to have the same batch kegged and bottled in the future for comparison.

However, from what I have heard, the bottle beer usually tastes a little better in general, but especially in beers where the yeast is a component of the flavor.

I like my current kegged beer (Oktoberfest) but it does have a mild gas (soda-like) taste to it, and I suspect the bottled version would have been better.

Perhaps I over-carbonated it? I don't know. I just set it at 12 psi and let it rest for 3 weeks before dialing back to serving pressure (8psi). According to what I read here, it should not be overcarbonated, but it's been 2 months now in the keg and still has that very mild gas taste to it. Thoughts?

 
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Old 01-27-2011, 09:24 PM   #22
gr8shandini
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Originally Posted by jfr1111 View Post
. . . For me, it's a small price to pay: hop more to compensate or buy upwards of 100$ of extra stuff

But I would love to keg if I had the opportunity to.
You also have to figure what your time is worth to you. I enjoy brewing, but packaging is just a chore. When I bottled, it would take upwards of an hour and a half - perhaps quite a bit more if I had to soak bottles. Now with a keg, I can be done in 20 minutes start to finish. Best $180 I ever spent.

 
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Old 01-28-2011, 05:17 AM   #23
twd000
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Originally Posted by Nic0 View Post
I've never kegged before... I will say, though, that MOST commercial beers that I've had, the bottled version wasn't as good as the stuff on tap (assuming they had both and I had tried both).
I'm not sure that is a fair comparison - what about the effects of filtering and pasteurizing? It's tough to make a true apples to apples comparison unless you know the entire packaging process of each beer.

 
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Old 01-28-2011, 06:05 AM   #24
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I started with kegging, but when I brewed a big beer I bottled using corn sugar to prime. Last year I built a counter-pressure filler. So far what i've noticed (and this is just anecdotal, I haven't done a true split batch/double blind) is that the beers that had keg time taste better. It could have something to do with cold crashing in the keg and getting a chance to draw off that last bit of sediment, I'm not sure.

From my experience, though, naturally carbing in bottles is easier, but I prefer the ones that I fill with my bottle filler, so that's what I'm sticking with.

 
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Old 01-28-2011, 06:20 AM   #25
Hermit
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Originally Posted by -TH- View Post
I'm on my 3rd kegged batch now (after approx 30 bottled batches) and I still can't believe how good my beer tastes. I never produced anything like this in bottles even after weeks/months of aging (and I have scored well in comps - 40+ several times). Maybe it was my bottling process but I have scrutinized that beyond recognition. The flavor I seemed to always be fighting was in my estimation acetalhyde which I just thought I would forever be dealing with.

I am so glad I'm kegging now! Best move I ever made.
Unless you are super sensitive to that then I would have to suspect something in your technique. I don't see the yeast producing that much during carbonation, not to mention they would have plenty of time to clean it up too....

 
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Old 01-28-2011, 12:27 PM   #26
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Unless you are super sensitive to that then I would have to suspect something in your technique. I don't see the yeast producing that much during carbonation, not to mention they would have plenty of time to clean it up too....
Yep, very likely a technique issue. I guess if kegging eliminated the issue, then I'm fine with that.

Something else I thought of is that I cold crash in the fermentor a few days prior to kegging which I never did when bottling. Maybe that makes a diff?
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Old 01-28-2011, 12:52 PM   #27
finley
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I keg, carb, and then bottle from the keg alot. It tastes better to me, and I don't have to worry about giving the warning about crud on the bottom.

I get more consistent carbonation levels from a keg, and overcarbed beer tastes really bad to me.

 
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Old 01-28-2011, 01:40 PM   #28
gr8shandini
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Originally Posted by -TH- View Post
. . .
Something else I thought of is that I cold crash in the fermentor a few days prior to kegging which I never did when bottling. Maybe that makes a diff?
I think that's the biggest difference to me (aside from the time savings). When I bottled, it took a long time for my bottles to fall to bright and no matter how carefully I poured, I'd get a little yeast sediment stirred back up. Usually, I'd just say "screw it" and drink cloudy beer. But now I cold crash and use gelatin in the keg and it goes clear practically overnight. Getting that yeast out of there really lets the other ingredients step forward and also gives it a crispness I never had previously.

 
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