Spike Brewing 12.5 Conical Fermenter Giveaway!

Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > DIY Projects > drilling my keg

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
Old 11-05-2012, 01:32 AM   #11
Golddiggie
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 1 reviews
 
Golddiggie's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Between here and there, and everywhere
Posts: 12,058
Liked 477 Times on 420 Posts
Likes Given: 266

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by milesvdustin View Post
Would fresh motor oil work well as a drill bit lube?
It might. I think it will smoke and stink like a mother though. 3 in 1 oil does a good job. Hell, even a steady stream of water over the surface will do a decent job of it.
__________________
Hopping Tango Brewery

跟猴子比丟屎 ・ Gun HOE-tze bee DIO-se

On Tap: Caramel Ale, Mocha Porter II, MO SMaSH IPA
Waiting/Carbonating: 12.5% Wee Honey II, 8.9% Old Ale, English Brown Ale, Lickah ESB, Mocha Porter II
Fermenting
K1:
K2: Epic mead
K3: TripSix
On Deck: Caramel Ale
Aging:mead
Mead [bottled]:Oaked Wildflower Traditional, Mocha Madness, Blackberry Melomel, maple wine
Golddiggie is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 11-05-2012, 11:11 AM   #12
deadfall
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
deadfall's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Location: Hammondsport, New York
Posts: 314
Liked 67 Times on 34 Posts
Likes Given: 212

Default

I was just drilling my kegs a few day ago and my step bit just stopped cutting. I tried various other bits and finally gave up. I decided my trusty step bit was 15 years old and deserved to be retired. I think the part above 7/8 would be still good so I'll keep it around for larger holes.

I picked up a new irwin bit, and man what a difference. I made a 1/8 hole and then a 1/4 and then the step bit did the rest. I did stop about half way and drill from the inside of the keg out. doing that made the burr alot easier to remove from the outside of the keg. I also used a little cutting oil on the bit. It still amazes me the difference in how they bits when you using the oil. The stuff I have is called Tap magic, and it's lasted me three years. The can is still full. I will say well worth the investment.

The burrs were also a pain but I had picked up a tapered cone shaped stone for deburing and it worked pretty well.

Oh forgot to say the first hole I drilled got hot and started to change colors. I figured it would be work hardened. I used a normal drill bit to wear down the discolored flange the the wooped step bit had made. The new bit was like night and day.

Best of luck.

__________________
deadfall is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 11-05-2012, 01:03 PM   #13
dfess1
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Flourtown, PA
Posts: 1,314
Liked 87 Times on 61 Posts
Likes Given: 77

Default

a sharp bit makes all the difference. If you have a bench grinder, you can sharpen your bits as well. A punch, go up in sizes, use cutting oil (all as discussed here) is pretty much all you need. Would be handy to have a deburring tool as well. Something like this: http://www.amazon.com/SHAVIV-151-29250-Deburring-Handle-Blades/dp/B003JY7LY2/ref=sr_1_9?ie=UTF8&qid=1352124171&sr=8-9&keywords=deburring+tool

dfess1 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 11-05-2012, 01:11 PM   #14
plewi006
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Posts: 1
Default best bit for cutting into a keg

I found one of these at lowes. So far i have cut 8 holes for my self and about 12 for other people and it still cuts like it came out of the package. They are designed for the electrical trade to cut holes in elec boxes of all metal types.
http://www.idealindustries.com/products/tools_totes/saws_drill_bits/tko.jsp

__________________
plewi006 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 11-05-2012, 02:44 PM   #15
Bobby_M
Vendor and Brewer
HBT_SPONSOR.png
Vendor Ads 
Feedback Score: 2 reviews
 
Bobby_M's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Whitehouse Station, NJ
Posts: 21,895
Liked 937 Times on 623 Posts
Likes Given: 28

Default

Those things are pretty sweet but at $30, I'd be more likely to go with a Greenlee conduit punch.

__________________
BrewHardware.com
Sightglass, Refractometer, Ball Valve, Weldless bulkhead, Thermometer, Decals, Stainless Steel Fittings, Compression Fittings, Camlock Quick Disconnects, Scale, RIMS tube, Plate Chiller, Chugger Pump, Super Clear Silicone Tubing, and more!

New Stuff?
Bobby_M is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 11-05-2012, 04:11 PM   #16
bierandbikes
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Location: Stewart's Run Farm, near Fredericksburg, VA
Posts: 182
Liked 14 Times on 13 Posts
Likes Given: 2

Default

I just drilled out my ss brewpot last night. First, punch the location of the hole (you could use a hammer and nail). I started with a 1/8" bit at 3100 rpm, cooling with WD-40. I then went straight to the step bit and slowed to 400 rpm, again with plenty of WD-40, up to 3/8" or so. Then I slowed to 300 rpm, and slowing drilled up to 13/16". I kept the bit and workpiece sprayed down with WD-40 and checked often to make sure my hole was only as large as necessary. The drilling was smooth and fast, but requires a bit of pressure. A good, solid drillpress is very useful.

Once the hole was almost big enough to pass the threaded connector through, I stopped drilling. I used a dremel tool with stone to clean off the burrs and then a small sanding drum to smooth it out. Everything fits perfect, no burrs, and not discoloration from heat.

Slow your rpms, use steady and consistent pressure, use some type of lubricant, and back off after each step to cool the bit and workpiece.

__________________
bierandbikes is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 11-05-2012, 07:50 PM   #17
fork
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Posts: 119
Liked 8 Times on 7 Posts
Likes Given: 2

Default

Yes any old oil will work. I also suggest starting a hole with a regular 1/8 inch bit. If you break it or overheat it , they're cheap. And it will extend the life of the step bit.

__________________
fork is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 11-07-2012, 09:26 PM   #18
simcoe26
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Posts: 114
Liked 2 Times on 2 Posts

Default

So I went out and bought a 1/8 drill bit made for metal cutting to make a pilot hole and it did nothing I used slow rpm and steady pressure and it went completely dull and no progress. What is going on with my keg.

__________________

In First: Empty
In Second:Empty
Bottled: IncrediPale Ale (dry hopped pale ale)
Kegged: Gumballhead Clone
Next: Perfecting the dry hopped pale ale

simcoe26 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 11-07-2012, 09:29 PM   #19
Golddiggie
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 1 reviews
 
Golddiggie's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Between here and there, and everywhere
Posts: 12,058
Liked 477 Times on 420 Posts
Likes Given: 266

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by simcoe26 View Post
So I went out and bought a 1/8 drill bit made for metal cutting to make a pilot hole and it did nothing I used slow rpm and steady pressure and it went completely dull and no progress. What is going on with my keg.
What bit did you get?? Metal cutting isn't the same as for stainless steel.

I've never had an issue with DeWalt cobalt drill bits going through stainless. When the bits are new, it goes through stainless like buttah.
__________________
Hopping Tango Brewery

跟猴子比丟屎 ・ Gun HOE-tze bee DIO-se

On Tap: Caramel Ale, Mocha Porter II, MO SMaSH IPA
Waiting/Carbonating: 12.5% Wee Honey II, 8.9% Old Ale, English Brown Ale, Lickah ESB, Mocha Porter II
Fermenting
K1:
K2: Epic mead
K3: TripSix
On Deck: Caramel Ale
Aging:mead
Mead [bottled]:Oaked Wildflower Traditional, Mocha Madness, Blackberry Melomel, maple wine
Golddiggie is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 11-07-2012, 09:38 PM   #20
mikescooling
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: Chicago, IL
Posts: 1,641
Liked 204 Times on 155 Posts
Likes Given: 185

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by bierandbikes View Post
I just drilled out my ss brewpot last night. First, punch the location of the hole (you could use a hammer and nail). I started with a 1/8" bit at 3100 rpm, cooling with WD-40. I then went straight to the step bit and slowed to 400 rpm, again with plenty of WD-40, up to 3/8" or so. Then I slowed to 300 rpm, and slowing drilled up to 13/16". I kept the bit and workpiece sprayed down with WD-40 and checked often to make sure my hole was only as large as necessary. The drilling was smooth and fast, but requires a bit of pressure. A good, solid drillpress is very useful.

Once the hole was almost big enough to pass the threaded connector through, I stopped drilling. I used a dremel tool with stone to clean off the burrs and then a small sanding drum to smooth it out. Everything fits perfect, no burrs, and not discoloration from heat.

Slow your rpms, use steady and consistent pressure, use some type of lubricant, and back off after each step to cool the bit and workpiece.
That's it he knows!! I don't do the cleaing part but I should. The WD-40, can catch fire FYI, but it is used with great success at cooling bits. What ever you use make sure to hose that bit down. I have also used soap with h2o out of a spray bottle.
__________________
mikescooling is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Reply


Quick Reply
Message:
Options
Thread Tools


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Drilling SS - Help nealperkins DIY Projects 11 10-15-2012 12:22 PM
drilling a pot joselastra Equipment/Sanitation 5 01-20-2011 08:23 PM
drilling through the wall? jpabian DIY Projects 10 09-05-2009 07:30 PM
Drilling a SS pot Wade E Equipment/Sanitation 10 07-02-2009 12:07 AM
Drilling through stainless kmlavoy DIY Projects 13 02-19-2008 05:19 AM