Ss Brewing Technologies Giveaway!

Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > All Grain & Partial Mash Brewing > Fg getting too low ???
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
Old 01-28-2013, 05:31 PM   #1
bmunos
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: Tulsa, OK
Posts: 289
Liked 11 Times on 9 Posts
Likes Given: 6

Default Fg getting too low ???

I have been trying different variations of the same beer for a few weeks now and the beer is tasting great... However my fj seems to be dropping below the target of 1.02. I have been pitching new wort strait on top of the old yeast and having great results. My question is can you have to much yeast???

__________________
bmunos is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 01-28-2013, 05:33 PM   #2
xjmox14x
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: Pasadena, MD
Posts: 460
Liked 74 Times on 44 Posts
Likes Given: 70

Default

What's the recipe? Also, what temp are you mashing at?

__________________
xjmox14x is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 01-28-2013, 05:50 PM   #3
zachattack
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: , MA
Posts: 2,477
Liked 241 Times on 207 Posts
Likes Given: 125

Default

Agreed, also how often do you check your thermometer?

To directly answer the question, yes you can certainly overpitch. I recommend consulting mrmalty.com for the correct amount, every time.

__________________
zachattack is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 01-28-2013, 05:56 PM   #4
WoodlandBrew
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
WoodlandBrew's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: Malden, MA
Posts: 1,767
Liked 123 Times on 120 Posts
Likes Given: 57

Default

Mr. Malty is fine for determining the number of cells you need, but the slurry estimator has been way off in my experience.

See here:
http://woodlandbrew.blogspot.com/201...ing-cells.html

If you want, I'll do a cell count of your slurry for free. See here:
http://woodlandbrew.blogspot.com/p/n...us-x-none.html

Most harvested slurries seem to be about 1 billion cells per milliliter of thick slurry. The viability is a function of the ABV of the beer that it came from and the number of days that it was at that alcohol level.

__________________

The 2nd edition is now available: Brewing Engineering
Woodland Brewing Research Blog Applied Science for Better Beer.

WoodlandBrew is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 01-28-2013, 05:59 PM   #5
Jayhem
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Location: Culpeper, VA
Posts: 2,568
Liked 257 Times on 208 Posts
Likes Given: 1163

Default

I have found from washing and reusing yeast that they start to attenuate higher and higher as they get older. I usually stop at 4-5 generations and start fresh liquid yeast from Wyeast or dry to prevent this. Also, if you are doing partial mash or all-grain your mash temps play a big part of how low the FG gets. Mashing at lower temps (<150) will result in a more fermentable wort and lower FG. Mashing at higher temps leaves a higher FG.

__________________

Next up: American Pale Ale
Primary 1&2: American Brown Ale
Primary 3&4: Hopped up Belgian Tripel
Bottle Conditioning/drinking: Summer Kolsch, White Zombie (Amarillo IPA), English Pale Ale (ESB)

Jayhem is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 01-28-2013, 06:09 PM   #6
WoodlandBrew
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
WoodlandBrew's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: Malden, MA
Posts: 1,767
Liked 123 Times on 120 Posts
Likes Given: 57

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jayhem View Post
I have found from washing and reusing yeast that they start to attenuate higher and higher as they get older.
That make sense. One of the traits that yeast commonly loose due to mutation is the ability to flocculate. Low flocculators are typically high attenuators. It's neat to see things I have read surface in others experience. Water washing yeast, by it's nature, will select the low floculators. I recommend that people don't wash their yeast.

Just store it like this:
http://woodlandbrew.blogspot.com/201...t-storage.html

It's easier and you aren't selecting low floculators and high attenuators. Rather, the cells will be selected based on the beer you like to make.
__________________

The 2nd edition is now available: Brewing Engineering
Woodland Brewing Research Blog Applied Science for Better Beer.

WoodlandBrew is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 01-28-2013, 06:14 PM   #7
Jayhem
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Location: Culpeper, VA
Posts: 2,568
Liked 257 Times on 208 Posts
Likes Given: 1163

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by WoodlandBrew View Post
That make sense. One of the traits that yeast commonly loose due to mutation is the ability to flocculate.


WOW. You just confirmed what I suspected that older yeast do not flocculate as well. I didn't realize that. After the 4th reuse of the same yeast I could not get my beer to clear without cold crashing. On the first 2 versions with that yeast it was MUCH clearer without cold crashing.
__________________

Next up: American Pale Ale
Primary 1&2: American Brown Ale
Primary 3&4: Hopped up Belgian Tripel
Bottle Conditioning/drinking: Summer Kolsch, White Zombie (Amarillo IPA), English Pale Ale (ESB)

Jayhem is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 01-28-2013, 06:18 PM   #8
WoodlandBrew
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
WoodlandBrew's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: Malden, MA
Posts: 1,767
Liked 123 Times on 120 Posts
Likes Given: 57

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jayhem View Post
WOW. You just confirmed what I suspected that older yeast do not flocculate as well. I didn't realize that. After the 4th reuse of the same yeast I could not get my beer to clear without cold crashing. On the first 2 versions with that yeast it was MUCH clearer without cold crashing.
Do you wash your yeast by mixing it with water, letting it settle for a period of time, then save the yeast that have not fallen to the bottom?
__________________

The 2nd edition is now available: Brewing Engineering
Woodland Brewing Research Blog Applied Science for Better Beer.

WoodlandBrew is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 01-28-2013, 06:39 PM   #9
Jayhem
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Location: Culpeper, VA
Posts: 2,568
Liked 257 Times on 208 Posts
Likes Given: 1163

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by WoodlandBrew View Post
Do you wash your yeast by mixing it with water, letting it settle for a period of time, then save the yeast that have not fallen to the bottom?
Exactly. I let the heavy trub settle out of the wash water for 20 minutes so I only decant off the creamy white liquid into sanitized jars for yeast storage until ready for a starter. The batches that had problems clearing were 4-5 generation harvested yeast.
__________________

Next up: American Pale Ale
Primary 1&2: American Brown Ale
Primary 3&4: Hopped up Belgian Tripel
Bottle Conditioning/drinking: Summer Kolsch, White Zombie (Amarillo IPA), English Pale Ale (ESB)

Jayhem is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 01-28-2013, 06:57 PM   #10
WoodlandBrew
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
WoodlandBrew's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: Malden, MA
Posts: 1,767
Liked 123 Times on 120 Posts
Likes Given: 57

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jayhem View Post
I let the heavy trub settle out of the wash water for 20 minutes so I only decant off the creamy white liquid into sanitized jars for yeast storage.
That's probably why your yeast doesn't flocculate. There's just as much, just as viabile, yeast in the "heavy trub" as there is in the "creamy white liquid". Water washing the yeast the way you have described saves the yeast that don't flocculate as well.


See here for details:

http://woodlandbrew.blogspot.com/201...revisited.html
__________________

The 2nd edition is now available: Brewing Engineering
Woodland Brewing Research Blog Applied Science for Better Beer.

WoodlandBrew is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Reply



Quick Reply
Message:
Options
Thread Tools