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Old 03-02-2013, 09:50 PM   #1
LeverTime
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Default Floaters in my Keg

I just pulled a pint out of my first kegged beer ever, a dunkel lager. I primaried for 2 weeks, raised the temp for 2 days, and then lagered for nearly 10 weeks at 34*. Then, I transferred it to the keg, force carbed, and it's been in the keg in my fridge for about 3 days. It's not quite carbed all the way, but my biggest concern is that the pint had all kinds of what appears to be yeasty floaters in it. How many pints am I going to have to pull out before I get a clear pint?

I've made this recipe before and bottled it. It didn't have an unusual amounts of yeast on the bottom of the bottles.

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Old 03-02-2013, 10:39 PM   #2
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You have to figure that the keg is just a big bottle. When you chilled the keg in your kegger, you essentially crash cooled. Most of the yeast in suspension has settled to the bottom of the keg. Thats where the dip tube is. So, quite normal. Usually takes a couple of pints to suck up the yeast that has settled at the bottom of the keg.

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Old 03-02-2013, 11:31 PM   #3
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That makes sense, I just figured I wouldn't have any, since I force carbed instead of adding sugar.

If I don't mind the texture / flavor / whatever, is there any reason not to just drink the yeast-floater beer? (I'm not worried about GI effects of yeast.)

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Old 03-03-2013, 12:12 AM   #4
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Drink away. It's perfectly fine. Usually I will get about 4 pints before it clears up. If you wait 2-3 weeks before pouring the first pint you can usually get away with only 1-2 pints of sediment.

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Old 03-03-2013, 12:20 AM   #5
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I'm one of those people who advocates using kegs as secondarys, so I go into the keg right after fermentation. Then after what I have to do is done (dry hopping, aging, lagering, all of the above, etc), I then hook a piece of beer line to the "out" of a fresh sanitized keg and push the beer into it. You're basically using a keg as a brite tank and clearing the beer. An awesome way to always dispense clear beer even if the keg gets a little jostled.

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