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Old 11-01-2013, 12:45 AM   #1
amazinglarry104
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Default Question about electrical setup.

I am planning to use a 220V, 5500W heating element. To control it, I want to use this 10000W speed controller in an enclosure with added fan for cooling

http://www.ebay.com/itm/10000W-220V-...item5af6dcdde5

I'm making this for a friend, and I'm not sure if his outlet is GFCI protected. If it is protected, can I just wire a 3 prong plug on the incoming line to the box and be good to go?

If he doesn't have a GFCI protected outlet, what is the simplest way to get protection?

Thanks!

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Old 11-03-2013, 01:58 AM   #2
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I don't know if that would work people usualy use a pwm in conjunction with a 40 amp ssr to control elements. You would put the ssr on one of the hot legs of the element and control the ssr with the pwm.

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Old 11-03-2013, 02:34 AM   #3
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I've seen those triac based dimmers for $20 from ebay seller 'haruyr_kb'. There has been some debate about whether the heat sink is big enough but it should be able to handle 5500W especially with extra cooling from a fan.

But first find out whether your friend has a 220V outlet that can handle 30A near where he can brew.

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Old 11-03-2013, 04:16 PM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by amazinglarry104 View Post
I am planning to use a 220V, 5500W heating element. To control it, I want to use this 10000W speed controller in an enclosure with added fan for cooling

http://www.ebay.com/itm/10000W-220V-...item5af6dcdde5

I'm making this for a friend, and I'm not sure if his outlet is GFCI protected. If it is protected, can I just wire a 3 prong plug on the incoming line to the box and be good to go?

If he doesn't have a GFCI protected outlet, what is the simplest way to get protection?

Thanks!
I bought one a couple of years ago. During boil the heat sink got too hot to touch and I did not trust it.

So instead I'm running a SSR with a PWM control circuit out of a SP-2000 stir plate and I have the SSR attached to a heat sink I bought from these guys.
http://www.heatsinkusa.com/4-600-wid...inum-heatsink/

You can have them cut any length you want. I had mine cut 8" long.
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Old 11-03-2013, 11:21 PM   #5
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thanks for the advice guys.

for the controller, I also saw this while browsing through some other threads.

http://www.stilldragon.com/diy-controller.html

seems like this would give me the basic control I want.


Also, I don't believe my friend has a gfci breaker. (He lives in an apartment)
If he used this extension cord with ground fault, that should be all he needs correct?

http://www.grainger.com/Grainger/GFC...FZ6?Pid=search

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Old 11-04-2013, 04:25 AM   #6
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This would offer gfci protection but it will be cheaper to simply replace the existing 30 amp breaker with a 30 amp gfci breaker. Even if you pay full price for a new breaker you should get out for under $170. And you can save buying a pair of twist lock cord caps.

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Old 11-04-2013, 01:06 PM   #7
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I don't think he has access to replace the breaker because he lives in an apartment. Otherwise this would definitely be the way to go

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Old 11-04-2013, 01:22 PM   #8
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You can build your own GFCI cord using a spa panel for much less cash. http://www.homedepot.com/p/Midwest-E...9#.UnetpZUo61s

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Old 11-04-2013, 03:33 PM   #9
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You can build your own GFCI cord using a spa panel for much less cash. http://www.homedepot.com/p/Midwest-E...9#.UnetpZUo61s
Cool, so I could just wire this inline with the power cord and it would essentially be the same as the extension cord with GFCI?
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Old 11-04-2013, 04:51 PM   #10
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Cool, so I could just wire this inline with the power cord and it would essentially be the same as the extension cord with GFCI?
Yes. It would be best to find out what your friend has available for power (breaker size, wire gauge, number of wires, receptacle type, etc.). You will have to match plug and receptacle, and whether his wiring includes a true ground will determine how to wire the spa panel. Ideally, he has a 30a breaker, with H-H-N-G going to a NEMA 14-30 receptacle, but let us know the reality and we can help.
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