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Old 02-06-2012, 01:58 PM   #1
BillyBoBum
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Default Extremely Cloudy gluten free beer.

I have never done all grain brewing by myself, but me and my brother were attempting to make a gluten free beer for my celiac father. Long story short, my dad is bottling the beer, and sends me a picture of the finished product coming out of the carboy. The finished product is so opaque, it looks like a mixture of milk and apple cider. You can see about a half centimeter into the beer.

Here is where the issue probably comes in. We had to malt our own grains, so I'm guessing, or assuming, that tons of proteins were in suspension. Anyone know how to help avoid this in the future? We malted Amaranth and Buckwheat, and used some canned malted sorghum in the recipe. I know that most malts come 'fully modified' and I doubt we accomplished that with these grains. Would a protein rest solve this entirely in the future (and are the right enzymes for that present in these grains)? Or will we always get a super cloudy beer?

On the plus side... when they were bottling it, my dad said it tasted great! I have yet to make a full grain recipe by myself, so I'm sure I'd eventually figure out how to avoid this issue.

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Old 02-06-2012, 03:19 PM   #2
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Did you try to cold crash it?

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Old 02-06-2012, 03:51 PM   #3
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That did not happen, but obviously seems like something I should try next time. Would putting the bottles in the fridge effectively cold crash it (with just more sediment on the bottom of the bottle)?

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Old 02-06-2012, 07:57 PM   #4
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Two points of note.

* It will probably fall clear in the bottles (mine is cloudy but clears up with three days in the bottle)

* During the boil use whirlfloc or kettle finings.

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Drinking: Hopped Honey IPA
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Planning: Belgian Triple, Blood Orange Wit and American IPA

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Old 02-09-2012, 06:20 PM   #5
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You can use gelatin (boiled in water and then added to carboy or bottling bucket or keg etc). I had this problem a bunch too at first (I use a lot of gf grains as well) and time, cold crashing, whirfloc etc all help to reduce the cloudy suspended proteins in the beer. I usually do 1-2 weeks in the primary ferm, at lest 2 weeks in the 2nd ferm with the last week spent in the fridge to cold crash, and then keg it. If I am making a beer with more grains (ie stouts, porters any kind of darker beer) I usually cold crash for longer. I think the suspended proteins affect the taste. good luck

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Old 02-10-2012, 02:08 AM   #6
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Did your dad leave it in secondary for a few weeks? Patience, Grasshopper....

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Old 02-13-2012, 12:41 AM   #7
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He only kept the beer in the primary, but it was in there a while. Luckily, he opened up one yesterday and said that it tasted pretty good, with low carbonation. I'll check out a bottle for myself when I visit him next to see how it comes along. I'll have to keep these kettle finings, whirlfloc and gelatin in mind when I make the next recipe to prevent the cloudiness from happening.

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