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Old 05-24-2010, 04:19 PM   #1
lpdb185
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Default 93-94% attenuation?

My la chouffe clone made with wlp550 started at 1.080 and FG is now 1.005, which I figure as 93% attenuation. My double wit with wlp400 went from 1.072 to 1.011, 94%, in 11 days. Is it normal to get this kind of attenuation or am I figuring it wrong? Is this good or bad?

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Old 05-24-2010, 04:22 PM   #2
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Are you mashing for an unusually long time at lower temperatures?

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Old 05-24-2010, 04:24 PM   #3
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first what are the recipes for the beers? two are you 100% sure you read the hydrometer correctly?

only your taste buds can tell if its good or bad. the second brew has an 85% attenuation.

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Old 05-24-2010, 04:54 PM   #4
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550 is definitely capable of that sort of attenuation, especially if you ramped the temperatures up to get the character of the yeast. And good or bad all depends on your palate and what you wanted to get out of it. If you like a big, dry Belgian beer, you're doing fine. If you wanted more body, then not so much. If you want more body, raise your mash temps, lower your fermentation temps, and you should be able to get to the right point.

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Old 05-24-2010, 05:10 PM   #5
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Low 90s is not uncommon for pilsner malt + sugar wort and belgian yeast. Remember that this is apparent attenuation and you are still quite a ways away from 100% real attenuation. It is not unheard of for a beer to have apparent attenuation > 100.

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Old 05-24-2010, 11:00 PM   #6
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sorry, i misread the calculations on the second figures. but the first batch was mashed at 150 for 60 min, the second batch was at 152 for 60 min. i'm still trying to learn how to match mash temps and times to different styles. up till now, i've just been doing 150 for 60min. i saw a similar recipe for a double wit that called for a mash at 152, so i used that. i just got nervous that perhaps it was infected (because the inside of my freezer was covered with mold when i got back from vacation) and causing the FG to drop that much . but, it seems to taste really promising and i didn't see any visible signs of an infection.

is there any general guide as to what mash temps/times match up to various beer styles, or is it all trial and error and personal preference?

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Old 05-24-2010, 11:39 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lpdb185 View Post
sorry, i misread the calculations on the second figures. but the first batch was mashed at 150 for 60 min, the second batch was at 152 for 60 min. i'm still trying to learn how to match mash temps and times to different styles. up till now, i've just been doing 150 for 60min. i saw a similar recipe for a double wit that called for a mash at 152, so i used that. i just got nervous that perhaps it was infected (because the inside of my freezer was covered with mold when i got back from vacation) and causing the FG to drop that much . but, it seems to taste really promising and i didn't see any visible signs of an infection.

is there any general guide as to what mash temps/times match up to various beer styles, or is it all trial and error and personal preference?
You should be able to use the expected attenuation of the yeast combined with mash temperatures to make some basic guesses. I think programs like beersmith will estimate your final gravity for you, but I am not sure how accurate it is.
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Old 05-24-2010, 11:46 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lpdb185 View Post

is there any general guide as to what mash temps/times match up to various beer styles, or is it all trial and error and personal preference?
If you single infusion everything, I would just buy Brewing Classic Styles and start there.

If you want to do traditional mashes for beers you have a bit more research ahead of you. Get Brew Like a Monk for info on trappist and abbey mashes, Wild Brews for info on Flanders sour and lambic mashes, and New Brewing Lager beer for info on decoction mashing.
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Old 05-25-2010, 10:44 AM   #9
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since i'm not reading text books every day now, i intend to get a few brewing books to read. maybe i can get around to all of these and learn a little more. thanks.

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Old 05-25-2010, 03:14 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by carnevoodoo View Post
I think programs like beersmith will estimate your final gravity for you, but I am not sure how accurate it is.
brewing software isn't very accurate in that regard. they just take the OG and multiply by the attenuation rating of the yeast selected. they don't take the fermentability of the wort into consideration.
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