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Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > Equipment/Sanitation > Johnson A419 temp controller
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Old 02-25-2011, 02:26 AM   #1
Semper
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Default Johnson A419 temp controller

I recently purchased the Johnson A419 temperature controller with digital LCD display. I'm going to use on a spare fridge and run the temperature probe inside and had planned to put probe directly in a glass of water to help gauge wort temperature. My question is does anyone know if the temp probe is submersible? I can't find anything it is or isn't and would prefer to keep in a liquid and not measuring air temps. Anyone done this or can give some advice?

Brewstrong

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Old 02-25-2011, 02:56 AM   #2
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What I do is put the probe in between a piece of bubble wrap and the carboy, then tape the bubble wrap to the side of the carboy. This way, you are getting a pretty accurate reading of the actual fermentation temps. Putting the probe in a glass of water won't be all that accurate because the temp of the beer will actually increase several degrees during fermentation.

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Old 02-25-2011, 01:05 PM   #3
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Originally Posted by HossTheGreat View Post
What I do is put the probe in between a piece of bubble wrap and the carboy, then tape the bubble wrap to the side of the carboy. This way, you are getting a pretty accurate reading of the actual fermentation temps. Putting the probe in a glass of water won't be all that accurate because the temp of the beer will actually increase several degrees during fermentation.
Okay thanks, I was just concerned that the temperature swing (from air temperature) would be a lot less forgiving than having the probe submerged in a liquid. I may try several methods and see what works best.
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Old 02-25-2011, 03:25 PM   #4
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Well the bubble wrap insulates the probe from ambient air. Putting that probe right on the fermenter gives you a pretty accurate reading of the actual fermentation temp. If you check out the Brew Strong episode on fermentation temps, Jamil recommends this exact method.

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Old 02-25-2011, 03:33 PM   #5
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my probe sits in air. my compressor runs 4 minutes every hour, and i have the data to prove it. temp range is +0/-3F of setpoint

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Old 02-25-2011, 03:39 PM   #6
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I have the probe end inserted through a hole in the end cap of a White Labs yeast tube. So the wired portion never contacts liquid. That's the way I set it up and it works so I just leave it be.

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Old 02-25-2011, 06:34 PM   #7
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I got the Johnson A419 too. I keep my probe in the air about 12" off the bottom of the chest freezer an inch off the wall, its just stuck there with some tape. I switched the jumpers on the controller from the factory settings, so its in cut out mode now I believe. Set point 61 keeps the beer at 60 , every time I looked it says 60. I keep a seperate thermometer probe taped to the side of the carboy and covered in some foam insulation, just for monitoring the beer temp. When the beer temp goes up as the fermentation really gets goin, I just lower the set point by 3 degrees to bring the beer temp back to 60.
I tried taping the Johnson probe to the carboy with the insulation, but it made the beer temp to cold. Even if I had the beer temp stable at 60 before I put it in the freezer, the freezer still overshot the set point and made the beer temp drop lower than what I wanted.
I did these tests with water in the carboy first, I wanted to get it all dialed in before I set my pacman friends to work. I found keeping the Johnson probe in the air kept my beer temps the most stable. I run the 1 degree temp difference and 10 minute short cycle delay.

Bob

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Old 02-25-2011, 08:15 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Buna_Bere View Post
I got the Johnson A419 too. I keep my probe in the air about 12" off the bottom of the chest freezer an inch off the wall, its just stuck there with some tape. I switched the jumpers on the controller from the factory settings, so its in cut out mode now I believe. Set point 61 keeps the beer at 60 , every time I looked it says 60. I keep a seperate thermometer probe taped to the side of the carboy and covered in some foam insulation, just for monitoring the beer temp. When the beer temp goes up as the fermentation really gets goin, I just lower the set point by 3 degrees to bring the beer temp back to 60.
I tried taping the Johnson probe to the carboy with the insulation, but it made the beer temp to cold. Even if I had the beer temp stable at 60 before I put it in the freezer, the freezer still overshot the set point and made the beer temp drop lower than what I wanted.
I did these tests with water in the carboy first, I wanted to get it all dialed in before I set my pacman friends to work. I found keeping the Johnson probe in the air kept my beer temps the most stable. I run the 1 degree temp difference and 10 minute short cycle delay.

Bob
I wonder why it is that you are nearly the only one doing it the right way. Seems curiouser and curiouser don't ya think?
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Old 02-26-2011, 12:17 AM   #9
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I wonder why it is that you are nearly the only one doing it the right way. Seems curiouser and curiouser don't ya think?
Not quite sure any method is the "right way". All I can tell you is that the method I described is extremely accurate for me. Like I said, I picked up that tip from Jamil and he generally seems to know what he's talking about.
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