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Why corn sugar?

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Ogilthorpe2

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I’ve always wondered if there is some advantage to using corn sugar over plain table sugar? Corn sugar seems like such a weird/arbitrary ingredient, but if there’s some reason I should favor it over sucrose I’d be curious to know.
 
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Joshua Hughes

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I think it’s supposed to be less flavor? I know all the simp,e sugars ferment out in whatever is used in bottling but I seem to have read that it leave no flavor compared to small amounts in others??? I very well could be mistaken
 

Jtvann

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I think it’s supposed to be less flavor? I know all the simp,e sugars ferment out in whatever is used in bottling but I seem to have read that it leave no flavor compared to small amounts in others??? I very well could be mistaken
Exactly. little to no flavor contribution as it is super fermentable.
 

Tall_Yotie

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From older posts, it was tested and shown that there is no real difference between corn or cane sugar. It is all the same, ferments just the same. Bad info from the 90's made people afraid of cane sugar, thinking it added a cider flavor, but was actually just really bad ingredients (hop infused extracts in cans, yeast packet of unknown age under the lid, and adding lots of sugar to up ABV). And that info got passed down for years and years without testing.

Corn sugar is finer, so is easier to dissolve, especially in a room temp wort. If you are adding it to warm wort, then cane sugar is just as good. No flavors added.
 
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Ogilthorpe2

Ogilthorpe2

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But table sugar has no flavor to begin with. Is there something that happens during fermentation Of plain old sucrose that produces a discernible flavor?
 
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Ogilthorpe2

Ogilthorpe2

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From older posts, it was tested and shown that there is no real difference between corn or cane sugar. It is all the same, ferments just the same. Bad info from the 90's made people afraid of cane sugar, thinking it added a cider flavor, but was actually just really bad ingredients (hop infused extracts in cans, yeast packet of unknown age under the lid, and adding lots of sugar to up ABV). And that info got passed down for years and years without testing.

Corn sugar is finer, so is easier to dissolve, especially in a room temp wort. If you are adding it to warm wort, then cane sugar is just as fine. No flavors added.
Beat me to it. Thanks, this is what I was thinking, but just wanted to be sure. I took some time off from the hobby after a move, and I’m working my way back into the swing of things.
 

davidabcd

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I'll probably switch to table sugar for priming after reading this. I was using corn sugar out of habit, I guess, and paying the extra money for it. Ironic since I was willing to substitute table sugar for Belgian Candi sugar which has a potentially huge effect on the beer. Using Belgian Candi sugar adds $20 per batch.
I can't necessarily tell the difference between Belgian rock sugar and table sugar in the final product. If there is a difference, it's not big enough to get me to stop using table sugar.
 

davidabcd

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no flavor gained.
Kind of noticed that. Making the darker, rock sugars looks doable if needed but, luckily, triples are my favorite. The syrup for the Belgian quads is expensive and I don't know how long it would take for me to get good at making those. The videos make it look easy. Maybe it is, but I think there's a medium to large learning curve.
I did make a syrup, supposedly fashioned after Lyle's Golden Syrup, for a Gale's Prized Old Ale a couple times and it came out like syrup but who knows how close it was for Lyle's?
 

Hoppy2bmerry

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I'll probably switch to table sugar for priming after reading this. I was using corn sugar out of habit, I guess, and paying the extra money for it. Ironic since I was willing to substitute table sugar for Belgian Candi sugar which has a potentially huge effect on the beer. Using Belgian Candi sugar adds $20 per batch.
I can't necessarily tell the difference between Belgian rock sugar and table sugar in the final product. If there is a difference, it's not big enough to get me to stop using table sugar.
Making our own ”candi sugar” is a big $ saver.
 

DanB_cdnbev

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Brown sugar and golden sugar can do interesting things. And for those who are willing to add $10-20 a batch for something new and interesting, Maple sugar will blow your hair back.
I avoid corn Sugar, because I avoid GMO. And generally, for me, the more refined a sugar is, the more likely it is to trigger my Hereditary Gout. I discovered the connection when I weaned myself off Dr. Pepper, in 2009, and went a year without a Gout attack.
Switching to Himalayan, Japanese and Korean Sea Salts are what helped me get over the hump on my cholesterol balance. I like meat and I like to drink. To be able to continue to enjoy both is awesome.
 

dmtaylor

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I've used table sugar for priming for almost 20 years. I see zero advantages to using corn sugar.

Just be aware that table sugar is "stronger" than cane sugar. You only need to use approximately 85% as much table sugar as cane sugar, otherwise you'll have gushers.
 
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