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What did I cook this weekend.....

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Bklmt2000

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Every Easter, we have a spiral-sliced ham, and the next day, I make a batch of slow-cooker green beans, and in with the fresh green beans, I include the ham bone from the day before, along with some water and seasonings.

Takes about 9-10 hours on low to cook, so I put everything together in the morning and let it cook all day.

So good. If anyone wants, I can post pics of my recipe/method.
 

paulthenurse

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Missed getting a picture after I plated it, but here's the final roux, the pot before I added extra stock, the pot as it started it's long simmer.

I couldn't bring myself to let the roux get that dark. It was dark but not brick red like yours. Simmering for about three hours now and SWMBO won't get home for at least two. I used a small hunk of salt pork, leftover sausage, the last of the leftover lamb with the stock and veggies. I have shrimp and a small piece of talapia to add at the end. Pretty tasty so far. No okra within 200 mikes of Boston in April, and the girl at the grocery store looked at me like I was speaking some dialect from roaming nomads in the Gobi desert when I asked for File powder.

Whatever. Smells nice so far.
 
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I couldn't bring myself to let the roux get that dark. It was dark but not brick red like yours. Simmering for about three hours now and SWMBO won't get home for at least two. I used a small hunk of salt pork, leftover sausage, the last of the leftover lamb with the stock and veggies. I have shrimp and a small piece of talapia to add at the end. Pretty tasty so far. No okra within 200 mikes of Boston in April, and the girl at the grocery store looked at me like I was speaking some dialect from roaming nomads in the Gobi desert when I asked for File powder.

Whatever. Smells nice so far.
Around here at least, you can buy frozen sliced okra. Works fine, I've used it more often than I've used fresh.

Gumbo filé is usually in the spice section, but I've also found it in the ethnic foods section or near stuff like Slap Yo Momma or other cajun spices.

It looks good the way it is though!
 

applescrap

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So would you southern guys walk me through the whole gumbo process please? If you make a roux why do you need okra, leaving aside for a month the anthropological connections between African slave cooking and French/Canadian "Cajun"refugee cooking? From a functional point of view you're going to bind up the soup.

Admittedly I've never been to Louisiana. That will change.

Thanks for enlightening a dumbass Yankee. I'll repay the lesson in seafood for anyone who comes this way
I would personally relish the chance to eat some fish and chips and hang out with you.
 

applescrap

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Missed getting a picture after I plated it, but here's the final roux, the pot before I added extra stock, the pot as it started it's long simmer.
Thanks for the gumbo lesson. I've admired your stews and gumbos since joining the sight. I need to start trying some of these dishes. Starting with the chili colorado.

How do you make that roux? I think I make mine too dry.
 

applescrap

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Shredded beef/cotija cheese/onion enchiladas, panful of a dozen, and then plated with homemade refried beans (from pressure-cooked pintos) and Mexican-style rice. Didn't get a picture with the homemade pico de gallo but oh well! At least I got some pictures!

I'm stuffed.
That looks soooo good. Any refried bean tips?
 
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Wellll - do you have a pressure cooker? I used my Instant Pot - 2 cups beans, 6 cups water, high pressure for 2 minutes, let drop pressure naturally; removed lid, strained off water, added 6 more cups water plus two big tablespoons bacon fat, a tablespoon chili powder, a tablespoon dried epazote, a big teaspoon dried oregano, another of cumin. Put back on high pressure for 10 minutes, let pressure drop naturally, opened and poured off some of the liquid, salted to taste and let stand til cool. Refrigerated, putting into a quart round container with some of the liquid - actually got two containers about 3/4 full each.

Tonight, I poured off a bit of the liquid then stuck an immersion blender in the container and blended til pretty smooth. Heated in the microwave. Next time I'll probably go ahead and put the blended beans in a skillet with another tablespoon of bacon fat or lard and fry them up til some of the liquid cooks off - they were just a tad bit thinner than I would have preferred - however, have had them served that way at many Mexican restaurants around here! I just like them a bit thicker.

Pretty easy overall, and these were some 4 year old pintos that we had vacuum-sealed in plastic containers but a couple of them lost vacuum - this was one of them. Had tried last week to cook the dang things in the roaster oven and after 12 hours they were nowhere near tender. KOTC declared them "dead" but I'm too stubborn to give up that easily, hence the pressure cooker, which worked like a charm. KOTC is now convinced it's THE way to cook beans and boy do I agree with him! Saved us from throwing out about ten pounds of dried beans.
 

Staestc

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Thanks for the gumbo lesson. I've admired your stews and gumbos since joining the sight. I need to start trying some of these dishes. Starting with the chili colorado.

How do you make that roux? I think I make mine too dry.
I use equal parts oil and flour by volume. You can start off pretty hot because the moisture in the flour (and maybe a little in the oil) has to cook off first which holds the temperature down. Once that it done it starts to get very hot very quickly and you have to turn it down to keep from burning it. And you never quit stirring. And you never stir sloppily cause it's like liquid napalm and if it splashes and hits you it will BURN!!
 

unionrdr

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Yesterday I tried something different with Tilapia fillets. They came in a 2lb bag individually sealed in lil pouches. Dipped in egg wash and rolled in Italian seasoned bread crumbs. Then fried in a cast iron skillet over medium low heat for about 3 minutes per side. I also made up some hushpuppy batter with the left over egg wash, as usual. But added garlic and chili powder. About 2tsp garlic powder and 5tsp chili powder to batter. Fried as thick batter in small 8" pan to make a thick sort of aropa. Served a breaded fillet over an aropa slathered in my home made honey-lemon pepper sauce. Still working on the exact format for the sauce though. I basically make it out of turkey broth/stock, honey, lemon pepper and corn starch/water to thicken. Thinking of adding some trulemon to up lemon flavor without too much black pepper flavor.
 

ericbw

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Every Easter, we have a spiral-sliced ham, and the next day, I make a batch of slow-cooker green beans, and in with the fresh green beans, I include the ham bone from the day before, along with some water and seasonings.

Takes about 9-10 hours on low to cook, so I put everything together in the morning and let it cook all day.

So good. If anyone wants, I can post pics of my recipe/method.

Well now you have to post pics.
 

ericbw

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Yesterday I tried something different with Tilapia fillets. They came in a 2lb bag individually sealed in lil pouches. Dipped in egg wash and rolled in Italian seasoned bread crumbs. Then fried in a cast iron skillet over medium low heat for about 3 minutes per side. I also made up some hushpuppy batter with the left over egg wash, as usual. But added garlic and chili powder. About 2tsp garlic powder and 5tsp chili powder to batter. Fried as thick batter in small 8" pan to make a thick sort of aropa. Served a breaded fillet over an aropa slathered in my home made honey-lemon pepper sauce. Still working on the exact format for the sauce though. I basically make it out of turkey broth/stock, honey, lemon pepper and corn starch/water to thicken. Thinking of adding some trulemon to up lemon flavor without too much black pepper flavor.

Tilapia is pretty good with some breading like that.
 

paulthenurse

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Every Easter, we have a spiral-sliced ham, and the next day, I make a batch of slow-cooker green beans, and in with the fresh green beans, I include the ham bone from the day before, along with some water and seasonings.

Takes about 9-10 hours on low to cook, so I put everything together in the morning and let it cook all day.

So good. If anyone wants, I can post pics of my recipe/method.

Please do

Thanks
 
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