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Viking malts

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captaincoffee

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This is a (5 gallon batch) beer made from 8 1/2 lbs Viking Pilsen and 2 lbs Viking Vienna. Looks like an amber!
That looks just like the NEIPA I recently made with Viking 2-row, flaked oats, and wheat malt. Came out super-dark with only 60% efficiency. I doubt I'll buy again after this bag.
 

smata67

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Little experiment. Mashed 1.3 oz of Viking Pale Ale Malt (2.1-3.2L) in 3 oz of water (about 1.25 qt/lb) at 150F to compare color with Fawcett Halcyon (2.5-3.0L). This is the first runnings only, so a bit darker than the results you would get after sparging. This was done for comparison purposes only. Viking malt on the right. Results in line with anecdotal and similar experiments: Viking Pale Ale results in a fairly dark end product compared to other European Pale Ale malts. Notice difference in trub between the two. Lost about 1/2 gallon to trub on the beer brewed with the Halcyon.

P6290869.JPG
 
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smata67

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So Viking claims that 50% pilsner/50% golden ale malt replicates the taste of Maris Otter. At current morebeer prices, 10# pilsner + 10# golden ale is $24. 20# fawcett MO is $36. I'm going to give this a try one day.

"Viking has done research that when Golden Ale malt is combined 50/50 with Viking Pils the resulting flavor graph is nearly identical to Maris Otter malt."

 
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verboten

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So Viking claims that 50% pilsner/50% golden ale malt replicates the taste of Maris Otter. At current morebeer prices, 10# pilsner + 10# golden ale is $24. 20# fawcett MO is $36. I'm going to give this a try one day.

"Viking has done research that when Golden Ale malt is combined 50/50 with Viking Pils the resulting flavor graph is nearly identical to Maris Otter malt."

Did you do this brew? How did it work out?
I am going to pick up some golden ale so I can make a Porter, I already have the Pilsner malt
 

day_trippr

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It's a grain. A historic one that fell out of favor due to yield issues before coming back due to its character...

Cheers!
 

Tobor_8thMan

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Yes, I understand, but I thought the malting process was different than regular pale malts. Unless I'm falling for the marketing hype? However, I do notice a difference in taste between beers brewed with Maris Otter and regular pale malts.
 
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day_trippr

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I suppose it's possible, though that would entail a number of malt houses using the same, special process.
But I've never read of anything specific wrt unique base malting techniques ascribed to any grain, really...

Cheers!
 

rsquared

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I thought Maris Otter was a 2 row, planted in the fall that was floor malted. Have I fallen for the marketing hype?
All of that is true in as far as how it is processed. But it is a specific variety of barley that they do that process to, which is the more important part.

In other words, doing the same process on 2-row doesn't suddenly make it into Maris Otter.
 

Tobor_8thMan

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All of that is true in as far as how it is processed. But it is a specific variety of barley that they do that process to, which is the more important part.

In other words, doing the same process on 2-row doesn't suddenly make it into Maris Otter.
Exactly, What's why I questioned taking " 50% pilsner/50% golden ale malt replicates the taste of Maris Otter." as BS.
 

Brettomomyces

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I thought Maris Otter was a 2 row, planted in the fall that was floor malted. Have I fallen for the marketing hype?
Maris Otter is a specific cultivar of barley, like Romas and Beefsteak are both individual cultivars of Tomatoes.

2-row describes the way the kernels grow along the axis of the barley stalk and there are many different cultivars in 6, 2 and even 9 row barley
 

bracconiere

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9 row barley

lol, now i want to try it in some beer! it'll be the name of my new band, 9 row steins! ;)


edit i wonder if i mix 6-row, and 2-row i can get close to 9-row? ok, ok, i'm just goofing off now..... :mug:

edit #2: back onto the original subject, the whole low price thing obviously was a bait and switch tactic for viking malts....they cost more then briess now...
 
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Brettomomyces

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lol, now i want to try it in some beer! it'll be the name of my new band, 9 row steins! ;)


edit i wonder if i mix 6-row, and 2-row i can get close to 9-row? ok, ok, i'm just goofing off now..... :mug:

edit #2: back onto the original subject, the whole low price thing obviously was a bait and switch tactic for viking malts....they cost more then briess now...
I got to tour a Colorado State experimental field last year...9 row barley growing right next to a plot of hemp being stress tested for THC levels :)
 

smata67

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Did you do this brew? How did it work out?
I am going to pick up some golden ale so I can make a Porter, I already have the Pilsner malt
No, have not used this, but most certainly will at some point. The golden ale malt is unique in that it is from Finland. So far, the viking malts that people have gotten have been from Poland.
 

thehaze

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I've tried Viking malts a few times and did not like them. The colour of the wort and final beer were much darker. There is a local brewery to me that uses these for some belgian inspired beers, but my god the colour for their Tripel, IPA, etc. is so dark. I believe most Viking malts are malted in Poland and some in Finland. I also believe most of what's on the market is from Poland and it's those that add too much colour.
 

Tobor_8thMan

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I've tried Viking malts a few times and did not like them. The colour of the wort and final beer were much darker. There is a local brewery to me that uses these for some belgian inspired beers, but my god the colour for their Tripel, IPA, etc. is so dark. I believe most Viking malts are malted in Poland and some in Finland. I also believe most of what's on the market is from Poland and it's those that add too much colour.
We're writing about Viking Pale malts? Correct? If so, color °L - 2.1-3.2. If so, this is certainly darker than Pils malt, and domestic 2 row malt, but not as dark as Maris Otter, American Pale Malt and British pale malts. (Used MoreBeer L info).

Please clarify "much darker" as this is subjective. "Much darker" to what malt?
 

thehaze

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I am talking specifically about their Pilsner malt. I made a few beers with 100% Pilsner malt ( Saison, German Pilsner ) and although the colour was definitely light, it wasn't as light as say Bestmalz Pilsner. I would say if the ones made with Bestmalz were 3 SRM, the Viking ones were around 4 SRM. So a shade darker. Could mean nothing to most, but I am keen on light coloured beers. I use a Grainfather and for the grain bills used for the above beers, I used 20 liters for the mash ( 60 minutes ) and 18 liters for the sparge. Boil was exactly one hour for all. Of course, there might have been other factors playing in, which I am unaware of. Not a bad malt. I just want a bit less colour from a Pilsner malt. At some point, I re-brewed one of these using Viking Pilsner and added more sparge water ( although I thought about oversparging and its possible risks ) and the colour of the finished, carbonated beer was close to what I expected.
 

smata67

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My experience has been that the Viking pilsner malt is right on in terms of color, but may very well not be the lightest of the pilsners out there. Best is 1.4-2.0L and Viking is 1.7-2.0L. I think the Viking maltsters have a heavy hand and tend towards the darker end of the range with their malts. The Pale Ale malt is definitely way darker than expected and will produce amber ales unexpectedly. And they (Viking malts) seem to not be as efficient as a whole, perhaps 10% less than anticipated. And this has been with both the pilsner and pale ale malts. But I don't knock this is a problem, it is just something the brewer needs to be aware of and make adjustments for. The Malting Company of Ireland's malts are the opposite. I get very high efficiencies and ABVs with their malts (both the Stout and Pale Ale). So if you have a problem with this, add some extract to bring the ABV up to your expectations with the Viking malt or some water to the MCI malt to bring down the ABV. It's all part of the unexpected surprises the hobby throws at you.

Pic: Pilsner malt meeting Beersmith srm expectations. Looks somewhat darker in the pic, but actually right on.
 

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verboten

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This is all pilsner malt with some flaked maize. Yeah, it's in a stupid green plastic cup, but it's clear and super light colored. I've still never had an issue with the color of my beers with this malt
 

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CaddyWampus

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I, too bought 50 lbs of Viking Pils while it was on sale awhile back at MoreBeer. The only issue I have found is the milling issue that was mentioned earlier in this thread. The first picture here is of my light lager that is 50/50 Viking Pils and Munich and the second picture is my mixed Ferm saison that is 70/20/10 Pils/Wheat/Rye. Both examples are appropriately pale as I would expect. I bought this when my LHBS was locking down full sack sales during the beginning of the pandemic so I don't know if I will buy any more, but I am plenty happy with my beer made with this malt.
IMG_6510.jpg
IMG_6519.jpeg
 

smata67

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The Viking pils can make clear yellow beers, no doubt. And a very nice white, dense head to boot. But the pale ale is darker, darker even than UK pales, despite spec sheets claiming otherwise. I have consistently gotten somewhat lower extraction with Viking, both pils and pale, though. I have 10 more pounds of pils left and I am going to make a helles and expect an efficiency drop. But the flavor is very fresh and crisp. I am good with Viking all around. The wheat has a much better flavor than North American and is definitely harder, but it is almost as good as Weyermann at half the price. Really looking forward to trying the Xtra pale for IPAs and the other kilned malts like the Golden and Sweet Caramel. And with a 3 roller mill, no problems whatsoever milling these somewhat larger grains.
 
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