Sudden Onset Obsession

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Brews and Blues

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Those QDs are all pretty much all the same and should last many, many years.
The ones with CMB (CM Becker) embossed along the top flange are known to be among the best.

The top cap (there's a screwdriver slit in it) comes out for cleaning and servicing (the small) parts inside. Make sure it's screwed down tight.

You got to find that leak. It's a matter of systematic search and elimination.
If your disconnected keg loses all its pressure over time it has a leak.

There are many threads and posts on finding (hunting down) CO2 leaks.
That top cap cost me a tank of CO2 when I was setting up my kegerator. I had no idea that it could come loose
 

IslandLizard

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Found it.
There's a flat o-ring under that cap making the actual seal with the body of the QD.
Make sure it's in there and not deformed. I don't think you can over-tighten that cap, so nice and tight should do it.

But... one little bubble? How often?
There could be other leaks. hose connections, etc. You can stick that keg upside down in a bathtub or large sink if it comes to that.

Also make sure the connection of the regulator to the tank has a seal in it. Can be a rubber, nylon, or fiber washer. The large connection nut should be tight enough too.

Have you weighed the tank yet?
 
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BrewHack

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But... one little bubble? How often?
It was almost continuously bubbling.
Have you weighed the tank yet?
No, not going to bother. I am confident this was my problem. Like I said before, I was careful to check everything but the QD. When took the QD apart I found the o ring was chewed up. Must have gotten caught in the threads when the QD was assembled. Luckily I had a spare o ring. Popped it in, tested it, and set everything back to normal.

Thanks for your help. 🙏
 

D.B.Moody

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Like I said before, I was careful to check everything but the QD. When took the QD apart I found the o ring was chewed up. Must have gotten caught in the threads when the QD was assembled.
Are you saying that you put that into use without sanitizing it first? 😮 Goodness gracious!
I have really enjoyed the tale of your journey to that fine-looking pint. :mug:
 

Brooothru

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There's a flat o-ring under that cap making the actual seal with the body of the QD.
Make sure it's in there and not deformed. I don't think you can over-tighten that cap, so nice and tight should do it.

But... one little bubble? How often?
There could be other leaks. hose connections, etc. You can stick that keg upside down in a bathtub or large sink if it comes to that.

Also make sure the connection of the regulator to the tank has a seal in it. Can be a rubber, nylon, or fiber washer. The large connection nut should be tight enough too.

Have you weighed the tank yet?
Man. I learn something new every time I log onto this site!

I've got a mixed bag of ball lock QDs from different sources and had noticed that the Becker variety have that slot in the top but never bothered to think that it actually had a purpose. For the last few months I've been getting foamy pours (at the beginning of the pour only, after it sits idle for a day or more) from one of my taps. I tried a few of the hacks listed elsewhere on the HBT site without ever finding a satisfactory solution, and finally just learning to coexist with the annoyance by dumping out the first ounce or two from that lesser used faucet.

Just checked, and sure enough it's a Becker QD. Hopefully that'll be the root of the problem.
 

Brews and Blues

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Question sort of related to this topic: I just kegged a brew last weekend. This is only the second one i have ever kegged. I read somewhere that some people tend to toss the first beer or so out of the keg stating that things sort of settle in the keg and come out in those first pours due to the dip tube sucking that stuff up first. Is this common practice? I don't feel like pouring out any of my precious home brew if i don't have to, but i also want that first beer to be tasty as hell
 
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BrewHack

BrewHack

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My first pour was only a little bit more cloudy. Taste was the same. I had good clarification in the fermenter though.
 

IslandLizard

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I've got a mixed bag of ball lock QDs from different sources and had noticed that the Becker variety have that slot in the top but never bothered to think that it actually had a purpose.
[...]
For the last few months I've been getting foamy pours (at the beginning of the pour only, after it sits idle for a day or more) from one of my taps.
[...]
Just checked, and sure enough it's a Becker QD. Hopefully that'll be the root of the problem.
QDs that look like the common black and gray CMB ones are all built alike. From what I gather the CMB embossed ones are original, and generally better quality and mostly trouble free. Now quality may vary among "generics" from other manufacturers'. I had an off-brand one that was a bit wobbly when mounted on the (liquid) post, but worked fine otherwise. I make sure i get genuine CMB ones.

AFAIK that type all have a screw-in lid with a screwdriver slot in it. That's how you take them apart for cleaning and servicing. (Pix courtesy of Ritebrew.com).



For the last few months I've been getting foamy pours (at the beginning of the pour only, after it sits idle for a day or more) from one of my taps. I tried a few of the hacks listed elsewhere on the HBT site without ever finding a satisfactory solution, and finally just learning to coexist with the annoyance by dumping out the first ounce or two from that lesser used faucet.
I can't see that coming from the QD.
But a small leak on the o-ring seal of the liquid (beer) diptube, thus allowing the keg's headspace gas to enter the beer line directly, is a common cause of unexpected foaming.
I'd look there for answers.
 

IslandLizard

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Question sort of related to this topic: I just kegged a brew last weekend. This is only the second one i have ever kegged. I read somewhere that some people tend to toss the first beer or so out of the keg stating that things sort of settle in the keg and come out in those first pours due to the dip tube sucking that stuff up first. Is this common practice? I don't feel like pouring out any of my precious home brew if i don't have to, but i also want that first beer to be tasty as hell
After a keg has been sitting idle for a length of time, any sediment (from suspended yeast usually) will pour out first, yup.
So yeah, if you don't want to drink it, pitch the first few ounces.

Once the sediment compacts, and the keg is not moved or otherwise disturbed, pours should become clear after that. Reason is, the dip tube sits in a little divot, once that clears out, it's unlikely for the compacted trub to slide into it by itself.
Now lager yeast is very powdery, it may take more time to clear it out, and even lifting the keg can put some of it back in suspension.

If there's a lot of yeast/trub that has settled out, you can transfer the cleared beer into a clean keg using a "jumper" hose.
 
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BrewHack

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Just finished my last pint of my first brew and am reflecting on this wonderful hobby. It is challenging, interesting, and rewarding. Super happy with how this batch turned out. I am amazed at how the flavor changed over time. At first it was a little bland for my taste but good. Then a week later, flavors really started to pop and I was loving it. Towards the end of the keg, good but not as good as before.

When this beer was at its peak of delightfulness I had family over. They all had low expectations and I loved watching their faces as they took a first sip. "Wow, it's good"

Brew number 2 is carbonating right now. The recipe is the one someone recommended above. The FG sample tasted wonderfully full of Citra hops. I think it'll be a good one. 😁

Even though I'm happy with the results, I still can't help but constantly think of ways to improve my brew setup and efficiency. It's just fun! :thumbsup:

Also playing around with Brewsmith and learning about styles. My next brew will be one of my own design fitted to the old ale style. I plan to try adjusting the water profile on this one, and mill the grain myself.

Thanks for all the help HomeBrewTalk!
Cheers. :mug:
 

IslandLizard

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My next brew will be one of my own design fitted to the old ale style. I plan to try adjusting the water profile on this one, and mill the grain myself.
Brewing Classic Styles has solid basic recipes for about any, well, "classic" style. ;)
Use them for inspiration, or just brew them as is.

Just a heads up for brewing an Old Ale.
The much higher gravity (~1.090) demands a good healthy yeast pitch and some good aeration or better yet, oxygenation of the wort.
Also solid temp control during fermentation and a ramp up toward the end to help it finish out. A small drop in temps can stall it. When that happens, there's little chance of waking them up again, and you'll end up with sweet beer.
 
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