Spike Conical- observations and best practices

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TheMadKing

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Screw the Benzomatic type tanks and regulators with zero regulation capabilities. Get an oxygen tank from your local welding supply store and a regulator that is in Lpm (liters per minute). That will actually be 100000x better. You won't be wasting the little red oxygen bottles left and right.

Also, infuse oxygen BEFORE you pitch the yeast. Not after.

There are companies selling the oxygen wands (stone on a stainless wand). Those are typically 3/16" OD tubes. Same as the ID of your standard liquid tubing when kegging. So easy as all hell to get (by the foot at your LHBS).

With my setup, I set the infusion rate depending on the recipe/OG. Since I get my wort chilled in as little as five minutes (for ~8.5-9 gallons going right into the conical) it's not running for long. With the shutoff on the setup I have, I can stage everything and then simply open that valve as the wort begins to flow out the chiller. I turn it off when done, before disconnecting from the O2 bottle (I made a QD post adapter for my regulator).

Sure, you COULD do it the cheap and dirty way. I just don't see the point for that. ;)

And I don't see the point of all that complexity 😁

I would challenge you to be able to tell the difference in quality between two beers where one was fermented with whammadine exactly tuned oxygen flow rates to 10ppm from a welding shop vs hitting it for 15-20 seconds from a bernzomatic tank and hitting somewhere between 8-11ppm. My fermentations are healthy and take off within 3-4 hours.

You can make good beer without pure O2 at all, so it's simply not worth the effort to make it perfect when there's such a wide range of "success" criteria.

Infuse before or immediately after, there's no difference really the yeast is going to use it.

As for wasting oxygen bottles, I have used 4 in the last 1.5 years. Which equals $50.. So that's pretty darn cheap

But hey, we're homebrewers. I make beer for $20 a bottle when I could just buy it for $2/bottle. Overcomplicated is the whole point! 😉
 

TheMadKing

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I use the carb stone on every batch. Even fermenting under pressure. I don't use blowoff tubes either. Even with the residual CO2 volumes in the beer, it still needs CO2 to carbonate fully. With the carbonation stone I can get the batch fully carbonated in 2-3 days. Which means, as soon as the keg is in the keezer it can go on tap and glasses poured. I also can off conical, which also makes things a lot easier. I pull 2.5-3 gallons into keg, the rest gets canned.

I also set the fermenting pressure depending on the recipe and if I want esters from the yeast or not. If I do, I set the pressure level low. If not, I set it higher. I'm also not swapping out ports/fittings in the conical lid once the yeast goes in. Or at least not unless I'm doing a dry hop addition (CO2 purged dry hopping). Even then, the butterfly valve is installed right after the yeast goes in, and capped. So fully sealed (and sanitized). I actually dry hopped my English bitter earlier tonight, after harvesting the yeast from it.

With the carbonating (fully) in just a couple/few days (in fermenter) my grain to glass time is shortened. I also don't need to do the 'rapid forced carbonate' dance. Or change out the corny keg lid for one of the carbonating lids available (did that for a few batches before getting the conicals).

The canning from fermenter makes perfect sense.

I've never understood the benefit of rapid carbonation for kegs though since I've always noticed that the flavor of my beer needs a few weeks of cold conditioning to really hit the peak. I actually use the lack of carbonation as a deterrent to keep myself from drinking my beer until it's had a little conditioning time lol

Agree that quick carbing comes with dangers. I prefer to just get about halfway there with fermentation CO2 and then set it and forget it in my keezer. By the time it's carbonated, it's dropped mostly clear and tastes ready to go!
 

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I'm sub $50 for getting at least 7 gallons into keg and can for almost all my recipes.

With what I'm doing, it's more of a closed system where I'm reducing infection/contamination risks. Plus, it's actually easier on me. ;) I've had the same O2 bottle for over 45 batches. It still shows "full". Getting the bottle swapped when its' time will be easy. I expect to get at least 100 batches out of the small (20 cubic foot) O2 bottle I'm using.

When I was using kegmenters, I used the stone on the stainless wand on the end of beer line to the regulator. It worked, but there was bending involved and such (my back doesn't like that often enough). Now, I just watch the wort flow into conical and close valves (and turn off the pump) when it's done.

BTW, Spike's recommended method of filling the conicals IS from the bottom port. ;)
 

TheMadKing

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I'm sub $50 for getting at least 7 gallons into keg and can for almost all my recipes.

With what I'm doing, it's more of a closed system where I'm reducing infection/contamination risks. Plus, it's actually easier on me. ;) I've had the same O2 bottle for over 45 batches. It still shows "full". Getting the bottle swapped when its' time will be easy. I expect to get at least 100 batches out of the small (20 cubic foot) O2 bottle I'm using.

When I was using kegmenters, I used the stone on the stainless wand on the end of beer line to the regulator. It worked, but there was bending involved and such (my back doesn't like that often enough). Now, I just watch the wort flow into conical and close valves (and turn off the pump) when it's done.

BTW, Spike's recommended method of filling the conicals IS from the bottom port. ;)

Do what works brother!

I actually fill mine through the racking arm like a weirdo
 

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The canning from fermenter makes perfect sense.

I've never understood the benefit of rapid carbonation for kegs though since I've always noticed that the flavor of my beer needs a few weeks of cold conditioning to really hit the peak. I actually use the lack of carbonation as a deterrent to keep myself from drinking my beer until it's had a little conditioning time lol

Agree that quick carbing comes with dangers. I prefer to just get about halfway there with fermentation CO2 and then set it and forget it in my keezer. By the time it's carbonated, it's dropped mostly clear and tastes ready to go!
With temperature control (glycol chiller) I'm getting great beers in shorter time frames than before I did that. Chilling either fermenter to what it needs is also a huge win for me. I ferment my main yeast (Wyeast 1318) at 70F and then chill to harvest yeast. Then chill more to carbonate. I can pull a sample from the conical to check both flavor and carbonation levels.

I'm using a 10# CO2 bottle for the carbonating of the batches. The 5# is for purging cans and any small additions needed (such as when moving the finished beer from conical). I used the 5# to do the O2 purged hop drop earlier. I do need to get the paintball CO2 bottle filled and get another one for when I take a keg remotely. Or for other items where a quick hit of CO2 is all I need.
 

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With temperature control (glycol chiller) I'm getting great beers in shorter time frames than before I did that. Chilling either fermenter to what it needs is also a huge win for me. I ferment my main yeast (Wyeast 1318) at 70F and then chill to harvest yeast. Then chill more to carbonate. I can pull a sample from the conical to check both flavor and carbonation levels.

I'm using a 10# CO2 bottle for the carbonating of the batches. The 5# is for purging cans and any small additions needed (such as when moving the finished beer from conical). I used the 5# to do the O2 purged hop drop earlier. I do need to get the paintball CO2 bottle filled and get another one for when I take a keg remotely. Or for other items where a quick hit of CO2 is all I need.

I have a similar process and glycol as well and I agree that it definitely helps to regulate your process better, especially with lagers.

we just had a baby in this household though, so I'm basically drinking solo these days, so I'm in no hurry for anything. It takes me 2-3 months to kick a keg by myself and I have a 4 tap keezer full, plus two lagering fridges. As long as I have something in my pipeline and I'm prepared for any competitions on time, I'm happy

btw 70 seems warm for 1318, I usually ferment my English ales at 65-67 with it and only warm to 70 at the end for cleanup. Are you getting any banana flavor at that temp?
 

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I have a similar process and glycol as well and I agree that it definitely helps to regulate your process better, especially with lagers.

we just had a baby in this household though, so I'm basically drinking solo these days, so I'm in no hurry for anything. It takes me 2-3 months to kick a keg by myself and I have a 4 tap keezer full, plus two lagering fridges. As long as I have something in my pipeline and I'm prepared for any competitions on time, I'm happy

btw 70 seems warm for 1318, I usually ferment my English ales at 65-67 with it and only warm to 70 at the end for cleanup. Are you getting any banana flavor at that temp?
Wyeast 1318 has a listed temperature range of 64-74F. I'm letting it go just over the half way mark. It's actually doing very well for me this way. At most, I get some esters when I reduce the pressure of the fermentation. Otherwise, it's just rocks. I actually have a couple of recipes where I want that addition. So I let it ferment at about 5psi. The other recipes are typically at 10-12psi (where I don't want the esters).
I need to see about reviving some of the 1881-PC I have in the freezer. If it works out, I'll use it for the next batches of either my IPA or bitter. I'll probably let that ferment at about 65F (listed range is 60-70F). I keep hoping they'll release that yeast in one of the private collection rounds, but it goes years between when it's available.
 

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Ordered up the Mason jar yeast brink item from NorCal Brewing Solutions earlier. Went with the one to use a quart jar to infuse/inject the wort into the fermenter. I plan to use one of my 1/2 gallon jars for the harvest. At least initially until I see if I can use a quart size for that too.

I won't have it in time for what I'm brewing this weekend (could be two batches). But I expect it to be here before the end of next week.
 

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Also, infuse oxygen BEFORE you pitch the yeast. Not after.

I think I've seen pros and cons on both sides of this pitching before or after oxygenating. I've recently been siding on "pitch then oxygenate" with the idea that the yeast starts consuming the oxygen immediately. Wondering if you have more information on the benefit of oxygenating first.
 

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I think I've seen pros and cons on both sides of this pitching before or after oxygenating. I've recently been siding on "pitch then oxygenate" with the idea that the yeast starts consuming the oxygen immediately. Wondering if you have more information on the benefit of oxygenating first.
The infusion hardware is on the plate chiller wort out port. So it happens as it goes into conical. The less time I have a port on the lid of the fermenter open, the better. After this weekend, I'll be using a yeast brink to get the yeast into the fermenter (through the bottom port).
 

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Here is another dry hop rousing video. I've added a spunding valve to the manifold and a 2" TC to ball lock gas post to the butterfly valve. I reduced the dry hop quantity to 6 ounces of cryo hops as I am still struggling with the Norcal yeast brink but that is getting better. Here is a quick hop rousing....



Hey Eric, I remember talking with you about this before but I can't find the posts.

What PSI are you using when you rouse dry hops and why are you using the spunding valve instead of just pulling the PRV to let Co2 in?

I just tried rousing my first NEIPA hop charge of 8oz and I ended up with it all just settling right back down again. I also had a good ball off hop paste sitting in the butterfly valve when I closed it and took the gas post fitting off.

Any tips for making this more effective?
 

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I don't use the sight glass anymore. Lost it to the need for more clearance above the Spike to fit my dry hopper.
I do still rouse the hops once or twice between 12 and 48 hours after adding. My gauges are all messed up so PSI is a guess. Probably about 10 PSI. Sometimes I use the spunding valve and sometimes just pull the PRV. Either way works but spunding valve is maybe a bit more gentle rousing.
 

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FYI, the SS Brew Tech spunding valves are available for order right now. I just placed an order for one, even though I don't currently have a fermenter for it. The prices are going up on October 1st. MoreBeer is saying they won't have any until December. :eek:
 

TheMadKing

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Question for the hive mind

I ran out of bernzomatic oxygen last weekend (and what do you know I have fermentation issues without any oxygenation).

As it turns out, oxygen is extremely hard to find right now. Evidently industrial oxygen production has been geared toward medical grade oxygen so industrial oxygen is harder to get.

There are no bernzomatic tanks in any of the 4 home depots or Lowe's in my area, and I'm looking at $220 for a welding tank plus regulator plus flow meter.

So.. I have parted out a system for hooking up my carb stone to the 2" dump port on my CF5, and I can pump sanitary filtered air through my carb stone into the wort using an aquarium pump while I pump my wort in through the side racking port.

Has anyone tried this? Any idea how long I'll need to aerate with air rather than pure O2 to have sufficient oxygen for happy yeast?
 

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Quick Amazon search shows a O2 regulator, for connecting to the tank (CGA 540 connection) is available at ~$50 right now. Get the smallest welding O2 tank they offer (20 cubic foot IIRC) and be done with it. The regulators are the type with set increments for liters per minute. IME, FAR better than the little red bottles and crap regulator that connects to them.
 

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So.. I have parted out a system for hooking up my carb stone to the 2" dump port on my CF5, and I can pump sanitary filtered air through my carb stone into the wort using an aquarium pump while I pump my wort in through the side racking port.

Has anyone tried this? Any idea how long I'll need to aerate with air rather than pure O2 to have sufficient oxygen for happy yeast?

OK, I'm on the side of not doing this and instead going for the O2 tank and regulator that Golddiggie suggests.

I haven't done it, but what I think I'd do is this: I'd want to know how much air per minute comes out of the carb stone. (Maybe time a balloon fill for 30sec or a minute? Got any kind of air flow gauge?) Then knowing that I use ~1L O2 for a CF5 and that air is ~1/5 O2, I'd work out how long to run the pump. Suppose the pump puts out .5L of air per minute through the carb stone. Since I want 5L of air, I'd run the pump for around 10 minutes as a first try.
 

TheMadKing

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Quick Amazon search shows a O2 regulator, for connecting to the tank (CGA 540 connection) is available at ~$50 right now. Get the smallest welding O2 tank they offer (20 cubic foot IIRC) and be done with it. The regulators are the type with set increments for liters per minute. IME, FAR better than the little red bottles and crap regulator that connects to them.

Yep thanks I found that regulator as well, no problem spending $50 on a regulator at all

It's the $220 for an oxygen tank I'm balking at. It's also an additional $44 for a tank exchange at my nearest airgas

I'd much prefer to stick to the red bottles, since for this price, that's 3 years worth of them. and we've already discussed my reasons for that already, but it seems there's a supply chain shortage on them hence why I'm looking at other options.
 
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TheMadKing

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OK, I'm on the side of not doing this and instead going for the O2 tank and regulator that Golddiggie suggests.

I haven't done it, but what I think I'd do is this: I'd want to know how much air per minute comes out of the carb stone. (Maybe time a balloon fill for 30sec or a minute? Got any kind of air flow gauge?) Then knowing that I use ~1L O2 for a CF5 and that air is ~1/5 O2, I'd work out how long to run the pump. Suppose the pump puts out .5L of air per minute through the carb stone. Since I want 5L of air, I'd run the pump for around 10 minutes as a first try.

Thanks that's a pretty good solution for making it comparable to an O2 tank, up to a point, since air maxes out at 8ppm in solution. At the end of the day I'm more interested in knowing how many ppm oxygen will be absorbed rather than in liters of gas bubbled through solution

Knowing how many liters of gas you've bubbled through is fairly useless info for brewing honestly. The only thing it gives you is a repeatable data point for trial and error

Edit:

Thinking on this more, modeling your O2 absorption from bubbling through a stone is really complex and depends on a lot of factors:

Solubility constant of the oxygen
Total volume of beer
Original gravity
Temperature of your beer
Column height of the bubbles
Flow rate of oxygen
Surface area of your stone
Pore size of your stone
Altitude/pressure inside your fermenter

It also seems at first glance that oxygenation in a tee inline during transfer would be more effective/faster than bubbling through the fermenter

Sheesh.. No wonder everything is just guess and check

@doug293cz does this happen to be something you have ever modeled?

If there is a thread showing it, a quick search doesn't bring it up.
 
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TheMadKing

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IME, a 20cf tank will last you far longer than three years at homebrew level.

I'm certainly considering this option, I would just prefer not to pay that much for a brand new oxygen tank because the prices are inflated right now. I'll keep an eye out for a used one

And I would still like to know how much oxygen I'm actually adding to my beer by flowing 1L/min into it for 60 seconds. It's really a shot in the dark, so I need to research that. I'd also prefer to oxygenate inline if I'm going to go that route. That way I have even more control over the oxygenation level by varying the flow rate of the pump as well as the oxygen. I will need to buy some more Triclamp fittings from Bobby M too
 

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I'm certainly considering this option, I would just prefer not to pay that much for a brand new oxygen tank because the prices are inflated right now. I'll keep an eye out for a used one

And I would still like to know how much oxygen I'm actually adding to my beer by flowing 1L/min into it for 60 seconds. It's really a shot in the dark, so I need to research that. I'd also prefer to oxygenate inline if I'm going to go that route. That way I have even more control over the oxygenation level by varying the flow rate of the pump as well as the oxygen. I will need to buy some more Triclamp fittings from Bobby M too
I went down THAT rabbit hole not that long ago. Added the inline oxygen infusion setup to the wort out port of my plate chiller. It does make adding O2 a lot easier for the batch. Plus I don't need to open one of the ports on the lid of the fermenter to put the O2 wand into.

I did use the carbonating stone setup to infuse O2 into some cider on Saturday, before pitching the yeast. I suppose that's an alternate method to putting O2 into the wort. Before I carbonate the batch, I'll have to remove the carbonation setup, clean it well, and then sanitize it. The valve was closed when I was done adding O2, so anything in it now won't be going back into the batch.

The only reason I could do that was the regulator on my O2 bottle is fitted with a gas ball lock post. I had to make the adapter for that.
 

TheMadKing

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I went down THAT rabbit hole not that long ago. Added the inline oxygen infusion setup to the wort out port of my plate chiller. It does make adding O2 a lot easier for the batch. Plus I don't need to open one of the ports on the lid of the fermenter to put the O2 wand into.

I did use the carbonating stone setup to infuse O2 into some cider on Saturday, before pitching the yeast. I suppose that's an alternate method to putting O2 into the wort. Before I carbonate the batch, I'll have to remove the carbonation setup, clean it well, and then sanitize it. The valve was closed when I was done adding O2, so anything in it now won't be going back into the batch.

The only reason I could do that was the regulator on my O2 bottle is fitted with a gas ball lock post. I had to make the adapter for that.

Oh I'll just put it in an instrument tee on the outlet of my kettle using the inline oxygenation kit that Bobby sells at brewhardware

I whirlpool through my counterflow chiller and chill the entire bulk wort down at once. I can do that to sanitize, and then start the oxygen flow when I pump into my fermenter

I don't use my carb stone ever, I usually just partially carbonate with fermentation co2 and then finish with a week or two in the keg under serving pressure.
 

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@TheMadKing I package into keg and cans direct from fermenter. So I DO use the carb stone with every batch. It allows me to get a batch fully packaged up faster, and easier, with less chances of something unwanted happening. I get between 6 and 8 gallons of finished beer at the end (I use 3 gallon kegs). My latest batch was a total of 7-1/2 gallons of finished beer packaged. That was actually done on Thursday after dinner. We were drinking it today. Actually I had people tasting it both Friday and Saturday as well. Fully carbonated on tap. ;)

First batch of cider for 2021 is full active now. It went active at maybe 12 hours from pitch. Full active (or ape-nuts) in about 18 hours).
PXL_20211004_023657250.jpg


I put the towel around the base of the spunding valve for when it blows through. I usually remove it after a couple of days fermenting. New glycol chiller (Max4) is keeping the temperature where I want it to be for the yeast (71-72F, yeast range is 65-75).
 

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@TheMadKing I package into keg and cans direct from fermenter. So I DO use the carb stone with every batch. It allows me to get a batch fully packaged up faster, and easier, with less chances of something unwanted happening. I get between 6 and 8 gallons of finished beer at the end (I use 3 gallon kegs). My latest batch was a total of 7-1/2 gallons of finished beer packaged. That was actually done on Thursday after dinner. We were drinking it today. Actually I had people tasting it both Friday and Saturday as well. Fully carbonated on tap. ;)

First batch of cider for 2021 is full active now. It went active at maybe 12 hours from pitch. Full active (or ape-nuts) in about 18 hours).
View attachment 744497

I put the towel around the base of the spunding valve for when it blows through. I usually remove it after a couple of days fermenting. New glycol chiller (Max4) is keeping the temperature where I want it to be for the yeast (71-72F, yeast range is 65-75).

👍 Your beers will improve if you give them 2+ weeks of cold conditioning after packaging. Fully carbonated does not equal fully conditioned
 

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👍 Your beers will improve if you give them 2+ weeks of cold conditioning after packaging. Fully carbonated does not equal fully conditioned
They get the time needed in fermenter first. I'm not rushing to carbonate as soon as fermentation is finished. My lowest ABV beer (3.0-3.1% ABV) typically goes at least two weeks in fermenter. Most go three weeks. I've also aged a couple batches on oak since switching to the conicals. Last one went about 3-1/2 weeks on the oak spirals. I think I'm going to start breaking those into smaller pieces to make cleanup easier. One of the two was sideways in the cone so I had to reach in from the top to remove.
 

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Ordered up the Mason jar yeast brink item from NorCal Brewing Solutions earlier. Went with the one to use a quart jar to infuse/inject the wort into the fermenter. I plan to use one of my 1/2 gallon jars for the harvest. At least initially until I see if I can use a quart size for that too.

I won't have it in time for what I'm brewing this weekend (could be two batches). But I expect it to be here before the end of next week.
Another slick design from Jay. Have had these on wishlist but now that diggie has one I’m gonna have to place and order…😖 😉 Thanks Golddigge….
 

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Curious to know how many people are using the carbonation stone (from Spike) to carbonate their finished beer IN conical. I find it's a significant time saver and makes things easier when the batch is finished. Since I fill either a 2.5 or 3 gallon keg and then can the rest, directly from conical. No need to bring more than one keg into the keezer and get them carbonated there. It also means that the racking arm gets cleared of any trub/sediment/etc. at the same time. I tend to have the racking arm either horizontal, or shift it to a slightly upward position for this.

I'm also thinking about getting one of these racking arms to play with when I have an empty CF10.
I have several Spike racking arms and like them. I also clear racking arm using CO2 to clear any debris before kegging. One thing I read about tryin a non-spike racking arm in CF unitanks is clearance; some are too short and won’t rotate downwards. I believe it may have been NoCal that mentioned this and they have one(s) that work great.

Cheers🍻

KBW.
 

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I picked up a different racking arm from Stout Tanks and am using it in one of the CF10's. Works well. I do wish that the o-rings on it (two o-rings that are in the ferrule) were a bit tighter fitting. One broke when I was putting it in the first time and the other wanted to get pushed out of the groove when I put it in again after cleaning the conical. I like the arm because it has a longer handle/indicating rod on it. Makes it easier for me to rotate it as needed. It's the same style that's used in the conicals from Brewers Hardware.
 

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Question for the hive mind

I ran out of bernzomatic oxygen last weekend (and what do you know I have fermentation issues without any oxygenation).

As it turns out, oxygen is extremely hard to find right now. Evidently industrial oxygen production has been geared toward medical grade oxygen so industrial oxygen is harder to get.

There are no bernzomatic tanks in any of the 4 home depots or Lowe's in my area, and I'm looking at $220 for a welding tank plus regulator plus flow meter.

So.. I have parted out a system for hooking up my carb stone to the 2" dump port on my CF5, and I can pump sanitary filtered air through my carb stone into the wort using an aquarium pump while I pump my wort in through the side racking port.

Has anyone tried this? Any idea how long I'll need to aerate with air rather than pure O2 to have sufficient oxygen for happy yeast?
I use Sidney Lee Welding supply and can get a 20cf tank and oxygen for $99. They have a location in Doraville that may be closer to you than my location on the west side.
 

TheMadKing

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I use Sidney Lee Welding supply and can get a 20cf tank and oxygen for $99. They have a location in Doraville that may be closer to you than my location on the west side.
Sweet! That's waaay cheaper than I can find up here. That's well worth the hour drive

Thank you!
 

Golddiggie

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@TheMadKing I say out the gas supplier that wanted to charge more than double the current rate (for the rest of the country) so people can avoid them. Both large gas suppliers are far less than $220 for the 20cf bottle in my area.

Hell, a 60cf nitro/co2 mix (75/25) costs less than that. :eek: IIRC, nitrogen is a more expensive gas too.
 

TheMadKing

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@TheMadKing I say out the gas supplier that wanted to charge more than double the current rate (for the rest of the country) so people can avoid them. Both large gas suppliers are far less than $220 for the 20cf bottle in my area.

Hell, a 60cf nitro/co2 mix (75/25) costs less than that. :eek: IIRC, nitrogen is a more expensive gas too.

Northern Tool, $170 for the empty tank, $35 for the gas fill, plus taxes
 

Nate R

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Also, look for "food grade oxygen" at you local gas store (i like airgas but maybe praxxair, etc.)
I got a tank of food grade oxygen as in CA i cannot (legally) buy himan grade oxygen, although they have perfect little cylnander sizes.
 

Golddiggie

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Only ever seen O2 for welding or 'medical' grade. Same O2 goes in, just different spec on the tanks. Lots of places can't give you medical grade without a valid Rx. Even if you get one tank filled, there's no guarantee you'll be able to swap it out later.
 

Wables

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Guys, do yourself a favor and split a batch, half pitched with oxygen added and half stirred up with a mix-stir on a drill for a minute. I did a pretty intense study on this 15 years ago with taste testing and no longer use oxygen. I understand the concepts, but at a home brew level you have bigger things to worry about.
 

Golddiggie

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Guys, do yourself a favor and split a batch, half pitched with oxygen added and half stirred up with a mix-stir on a drill for a minute. I did a pretty intense study on this 15 years ago with taste testing and no longer use oxygen. I understand the concepts, but at a home brew level you have bigger things to worry about.
Not viable with conical fermenters. Would require either removing the entire lid, or (at the very least) pulling the chill coil to do that. Plus I don't think my drill is clean enough for me to be comfortable using that above wort.
 

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Only ever seen O2 for welding or 'medical' grade. Same O2 goes in, just different spec on the tanks. Lots of places can't give you medical grade without a valid Rx. Even if you get one tank filled, there's no guarantee you'll be able to swap it out later.
Excellent info on response… I found that to be true here. If you wanna see the differences in the O2 purity by classification see attached….and draw your own conclusions. The tank ratings are key.

Cheers 🍻

KBW.
 

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