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ErieShores

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I recently purchased a corney system with some line to run from the regulator to the keg. I bought 10 feet but I know it should be cut to a shorter length. How long is the maximum/minimum?
 

Suthrncomfrt1884

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As short as you want it. Gas line isn't a big deal. I just use enough to get through my fridge and to the keg with enough left over to move the keg around a bit.
 

elmetal

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depends how high your tap is honestly.

My coffinbox is high so from the top of the keg to my tap it's about. 24-28 inches. 5 feet works fine for me (though I use 10)

some people will always say 5 never works but they are just spitting out crazyness. I can tell you 5 works fine if your tower is going to be high.

if you are using about the same height, or picnic taps, go for 8+ of thickwall 3/16
 

qvantamon

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5 ft is on the short side, despite what every calculator out there will tell you. I had 5, then bought 8 ft lines, and still think I could use a bit more. Learn from my mistake, and buy 10 ft. You can always cut them down to 8 later, but if you buy short you'll have to buy again, and attach to your shanks again (which in my case involves removing the tower again)... a PITA.
 

qvantamon

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fluid passing through a narrow passage loses pressure to the walls (I don't know the full fluid dynamics for this). Longer lines cause more loss of pressure to the walls (roughly in linear proportion to the length). The idea is that you want to have 12-15psi of pressure on the keg (to carbonate), but a very low pressure on the tap (so liquid flows slowly and doesn't foam up). So you use a long stretch of tubing to lower the pressure that reaches the tap.
 

beerloin

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so my best bet is to split the gas and use the 5 ft line that i bought as a gas line for the 2nd keg... and buy 2 10 ft lines for dispensing?
 

qvantamon

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Gas lines and beer lines are different diameters - you can't use one as the other.
 

elmetal

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typically beerline is thickwall 3/16" (5/16OD)

while gas lines are typically 7/16" (9/16OD)

Notice I say typically, because your mileage may vary.
 

beerloin

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ill have to check the line size when i get home... but for some reason, i feel like they are the same size!!!

...never really checked...
 

Scimmia

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typically beerline is thickwall 3/16" (5/16OD)

while gas lines are typically 7/16" (9/16OD)

Notice I say typically, because your mileage may vary.
7/16" would be some massive gas line. Most I've seen is 5/16".
 

DKershner

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ill have to check the line size when i get home... but for some reason, i feel like they are the same size!!!

...never really checked...

There is a small chance that you have 1/4" gas line and 1/4" beer line, but if this is the case, you should REALLY switch the beer line to 3/16".
 

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