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Kolsch Dry Yeast

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unionrdr

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I haven't found a dry kolsch yeast in my searches. I just use the WL029 liquid yeast, since it's range is 65-69F, just right for the average ale brewer to get that lager-like balance & bit of crispness on the back.
 

madk

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Others may disagree but I'd go with US-05. You want it to ferment clean and that is exactly what this strain does. I'd ferment it cool (low 60s) and then cold crash it for awhile.
 

solbes

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Sorry, but similar to Belgians, Kolsch is all about the yeast. You can duplicate the grain bill and hop bill, but when you throw in dry ale or lager yeast, you get an ale or lager. Not a Kolsch.

Its a really fantastic yeast strain though, so my suggestion would be to pony up for the WY2565 (ferment at 59) or the WLP029 (ferment in low to mid 60's) and make a Kolsch. Starter is also almost necessary. To diminish the costs, harvest the yeast and also brew an Alt (darker beer with noble hoppiness), and then maybe another brew too. WY2565 is probably my favorite overall yeast strain.
 

unionrdr

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That's good, but a kolsch is an ale with lager-like qualities. That's the tough part, trying to find a dry yeast counterpart.
 

brewprint

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I use the liquid yeast and just build a 1 liter starter and dump part of it in a pint mason jar. Then make another 1 liter starter from that.

Then I dump part of it in a pint mason jar and make another starter from that.

Then I dump part of it in a pint mason jar and make another starter from that.

Then I dump part of it in a pint mason jar and make another starter from that.

Do you see how liquid yeast is actually cheaper now?
 

unionrdr

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Good of you to mention it again. I forgot about that one you mentioned to me at one point. By the way you guys, I just got an e-mail from Beersmith about the new 2015 BJCP guidelines add-on that's available now.
 

Hanglow

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I'd use notty at around 55F or so

although none of them will really do the job properly
 

BigEd

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There is no dry Kolsch yeast. I would agree that the US-05 is as good a choice as any. Use it towards the low end of its temp range, call the beer a Kolsch and very few will know the difference.

However, as solbes said above, Kolsch is all about the yeast and what you will have is a blond ale. At some point in the future brew another Kolsch and use one of the yeast strains recommended by solbes. Then you will have a beer with the true nuances of the style. :mug:
 

Bosh

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Think US-05 would get drier than you want for a kolsch...
 

unionrdr

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The whole point here is that kolsch is an ale, true. BUT, it's an ale with lager-like balance with a hint of crispness on the back. Not exactly dry, but not exactly sweet like an ale, either. It's an ale trying to be a light lager or light pilsner. Something akin to that...:mug:
 

solbes

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Its damn near perfection in a glass, that's what it is. My 7th batch is in primary clearing up. I'm having a really hard time not kegging it right now as summer just officially started. Maybe another week and it'll be time to tap a keg.

I'm also going to start looking for K-97. Those who used it, any feedback to giv ehere.
 

Auger

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I used Saflager 34/70 for a Kolsch-style one time, fermented at closer to ale-ish temps with a cooler (55-60°) rest/"lagering" period). It was good.
 

GuldTuborg

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I'm also going to start looking for K-97. Those who used it, any feedback to giv ehere.
It's good stuff. Performs well around 60F or so. It can be a little slow to clear, but if you cold crash and lager for a few weeks, it's not a problem at all. It's no 2565, but it's quite good.
 

Jim311

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I'm getting ready to try WLP011 as a substitute, which is liquid, but about all the shop had. I'll see if it's got that proper bite a good Kolsch has. One of my favorite "damn it's hot" beers is "JDubs Poolside Kolsch" and I was hoping to recreate it but the shop didn't have a true Kolsch yeast in stock. Hoping for the best but if nothing else I'll still have a smooth light yellow ale for summer drankin.
 

unionrdr

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Northern European yeast. A bit on the malty side attenuation-wise, but clean with no sulfur. About the same range as WL029...
 
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