Irish Red Ale Irish Red (1st place HBT comp)

Homebrew Talk - Beer, Wine, Mead, & Cider Brewing Discussion Forum

Help Support Homebrew Talk:

rchrdpdl

Member
Joined
Jun 6, 2013
Messages
11
Reaction score
1
Does anyone have reports on drinking this younger than the recommended 4 months?

I definitely want to try this but if it really does need the 4 months then that will impact my pipeline so I'll have to do it next weekend as opposed to today...
 

kombat

Well-Known Member
Joined
Oct 17, 2009
Messages
5,681
Reaction score
2,188
Location
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
Does anyone have reports on drinking this younger than the recommended 4 months?
It's fine younger than 4 months. This is a fantastic recipe, I've actually got a batch of it in primary right now. It benefits from a month or so of lagering, and the result is a deliciously smooth Irish Red that's very clear, with just a hint of roastiness from the roasted barley.
 

rchrdpdl

Member
Joined
Jun 6, 2013
Messages
11
Reaction score
1
It's fine younger than 4 months. This is a fantastic recipe, I've actually got a batch of it in primary right now. It benefits from a month or so of lagering, and the result is a deliciously smooth Irish Red that's very clear, with just a hint of roastiness from the roasted barley.
Awesome, glad to hear it.

Thanks for the tip on the lagering.
 

Fyrestorm

New Member
Joined
Nov 4, 2013
Messages
2
Reaction score
0
Has anyone cut the 10 gallon recipe in half to brew a 5 gallon all grain?
 

BannyBrewer

Member
Joined
Mar 20, 2013
Messages
23
Reaction score
5
I brewed this January 3rd and tapped last week, wow what a great beer! As mentioned it is quite dark but the flavor is amazing. Several of my critical tasting friends claim this is my best........you guessed it my grain bill will arrive tomorrow for another batch this weekend! I would like to modify slightly to get a more red less dark color but not impact flavor, any suggestions?
 
OP
Saccharomyces

Saccharomyces

Be good to your yeast...
Lifetime Supporter
Joined
Jun 17, 2008
Messages
5,438
Reaction score
152
Location
Pflugerville, Texas
I don't recall if anybody has reported the results of using lager yeast with this recipe, though. I think brewing it in a hybrid style, either with say, Scottish Ale yeast (1728, etc), or like an Alt (1007), depending on how much attenuation you want, would be pretty neat with this style.
A buddy and I brewed this back in the fall with WLP940 Mexican Lager. It was so good I pretty much went on a week-long bender and drank it all. :drunk:

J/K but it didn't last very long, I think it was my favorite so far, with 1272 (my original yeast) coming in second and a version with US-05 being my least favorite.
 
Joined
Mar 2, 2014
Messages
9
Reaction score
0
Location
Toronto
My house Irish Red ale. It is best after 4 months of aging, so I brew 10 gallon batches and re-brew when the first keg kicks. The key to this style is malt forward but with a roasty, dry finish. Hop flavor is barely noticeable and there is no hop aroma. If you can lager, even better, use a clean lager yeast (eg. WLP840, WLP833). I only do ales though so I pitch Wyeast 1272, and ferment on the low end of the range to suppress ester production. Wyeast 1272 American Ale II is a nice, clean ale yeast that accentuates malt character. WLP051 is an exact sub for this yeast (it is the Anchor Liberty strain). If you use dry yeast, Nottingham or US-05 will work fine for this style, but if using the dry I recommend increasing the mash temp to 152*F.

This style should be crystal clear in the glass and shine ruby red when held up to a light. If you bottle condition, I recommend a two week secondary followed by pitching some English yeast like a half package of S-04 in the bottling bucket so the beer finishes nice and clear in the bottle.

Malt Bill for 10 gallons:

12# Maris Otter (70%)
4# Vienna (24%)
12oz British Roasted Barley 500L (4%)
6oz Crystal 120L (2%)

Mash 150*F for 75 min.

Hop Bill for 10 gallons:

2oz 4.5% AA Fuggles (75 min)
1oz 5.0% AA Goldings (15 min)

Extract Version (for 5 gal):

4# Light DME
2# Munich LME
5oz Roasted Barley, steeped 20 min @155*F
2.5oz C120L, steeped 20 min @155*F




Sent from my iPhone using Home Brew
 

pfgonzo

Well-Known Member
Lifetime Supporter
Joined
Oct 22, 2008
Messages
733
Reaction score
85
Location
San Francisco Bay Area
I just tapped my keg on a 5.5g version of this. My malt bill was:

8lbs Marris Otter
2lbs Vienna
1/2lb Carared
1/2lb Crystal 120
2oz Roasted Barley (less than half the original 10g recipe... wanted to see if I could lighten it and let more red through)

1oz fuggles at 60, and 1 oz of EKG at 10.

[Edit] I should mention that I pitched this with Notty, and fermented at 66F. [/Edit]

(Note, the mill at my LHBS had an issue and I had less than ideal efficiency on the above grain bill. Instead of ~6.3%abv, I'm just barely over 5%.)

I brewed it on Feb 1st, and it is already delicious, and getting rave reviews from friends/family/coworkers. Light and very drinkable. Def a rebrew!

Here it is held up to a window to let the light shine in (you can't tell it's clear unless you do!).

Irish Red.jpg
 

w0732400

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jan 15, 2014
Messages
152
Reaction score
12
Color question?
I brewed the original posters recipe yet I added 6 oz. of oats. I racked it to secondary yesterday and it seems a lot darker than I was expecting and it seems to be lacking any real red hue. As it clears will this become more prevalent? It's original gravity was 1.050 and I use a hydrometer and the conversion from NB says it is now at 1.010 so it was about spot on gravity wise to the OP recipe. Is there anything that I could have done that messed up the color? I'll post a pic of how it turns out in the end.


Sent from my iPhone using Home Brew
 

pfgonzo

Well-Known Member
Lifetime Supporter
Joined
Oct 22, 2008
Messages
733
Reaction score
85
Location
San Francisco Bay Area
It's the roasted barley. It makes the beer look almost black unless you hold it up to a bright light source, and get the right angle. I cut it down to only 2oz in my 5.5g batch, and still have that issue.

[Edit] Go back a page to post 210, and see what reducing the roasted barley gets you: https://www.homebrewtalk.com/f65/irish-red-1st-place-hbt-comp-141086/index21.html#post6003299 Bear in mind it STILL looks opaque and almost black unless you hold it up to the light. Regardless of the look, the taste is PHENOMENAL.
 

bunt1828

Well-Known Member
Joined
Apr 12, 2013
Messages
68
Reaction score
5
Location
Houston
I'm just drinking the first of my batch, and I definitely made an Irish Black. I was dumb and scaled the entire recipe up to be sure and hit target OG (had low efficiency). Since I kept the original % of roasted barley, I ended with 0.75lbs in my recipe. I'm going to scale that way back for the next one, but I'm still very happy with the results of this one. It is super smooth and delicious. And at only 7 weeks old, itll only get better.

ImageUploadedByHome Brew1395603799.034902.jpg


Sent from my iPhone using Home Brew
 

rchrdpdl

Member
Joined
Jun 6, 2013
Messages
11
Reaction score
1
I had the same experience as everyone above - it's definitely not red. It's a good beer for sure, just the wrong colour!

1395606403593.jpg
 

w0732400

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jan 15, 2014
Messages
152
Reaction score
12
I added some oats to help the mouthfeel so that probably didn't help I'll post a pic when I start drinking it


Sent from my iPhone using Home Brew
 

bunt1828

Well-Known Member
Joined
Apr 12, 2013
Messages
68
Reaction score
5
Location
Houston
Yep, 5 gallons in the keg, 6 gal in the kettle. I just noticed my 5gal recipe had the same amount of grain as the original post did for twice that volume.. Terrible.

It IS very malty, but I'm not sure it is dry enough for a stout. Tastes similar to the porter I made last. While ill reduce the RB considerably for my next batch to be closer in color (and flavor) to a red, I'm happy with this one and looking forward to enjoying it as it ages.

Cheers.


Sent from my iPhone using Home Brew
 

pfgonzo

Well-Known Member
Lifetime Supporter
Joined
Oct 22, 2008
Messages
733
Reaction score
85
Location
San Francisco Bay Area
Ok so... IPAs are my general go-to beer. I love chocolatey porters, and hoppy ambers. The occasional sour, sure!

I never would have guessed when I brewed this Irish red that it would dominate my preferences until the keg kicked. I've never burned through 5 gallons this fast. This recipe is an unequivocal winner, and just became my house-ale.
 

raymadigan

Well-Known Member
Joined
Apr 15, 2011
Messages
274
Reaction score
13
Location
Western
After many trials and tribulations I finally got to drink one of these. I brewed this in the beginning of august of last year a few weeks before i had hand surgery. I brewed it with a lager yeast, Wyeast 2279 and after the primary was complete I moved it to a secondary for a while. In the secondary I blasted co2 on top to keep the oxygen away. It was in secondary at about 31F for 6 months.

I made a 2.5 gallon batch and used about 2 oz of Roasted barley and it turned out so good. It took longer to bottle condition because I didn't add any yeast when I bottled it. I will edit this and include an image, the bottle I had just now didn't last long enough. :)

IMAG0602.jpg
 

w0732400

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jan 15, 2014
Messages
152
Reaction score
12
HORRIBLE day!!!! I brewed this a couple of months ago. I just kegged it last week. I brewed a 10 gallon batch luckily I only kegged half of it. I've probably had 12 pints out of the keg and apparently the threaded flare fitting on the liquid side loosened itself as I moved the hose around I came home today to an empty corny and 4ish gallons of this beer on the bottom of my chest freezer. What a horrible way to start a 4 day weekend. In addition my co2 tank emptied out after the beer was out of the keg. Hope everyone else has a good weekend


Sent from my iPhone using Home Brew
 

maloneybrews

New Member
Joined
Dec 11, 2013
Messages
1
Reaction score
0
This is the best recipe I have made to date. Tried a sample with the beer still very young and it tasted awesome great mix of roasted flavours with the caramel and raison. I used wlp004 and it turned out great tastes a lot like a smithwicks for sure.
 

pfgonzo

Well-Known Member
Lifetime Supporter
Joined
Oct 22, 2008
Messages
733
Reaction score
85
Location
San Francisco Bay Area
Brewed this up again this afternoon. Got a late start (wife is sick) so I thought I'd try my first batch sparge. I've only fly sparged previously because my system allows for it, and I've always heard it achieves a slightly higher efficiency. I wasn't expecting the 8-9% drop by batch sparging though! Crazy!

Thankfully, I upped the MO just a tad from my previous brew of this recipe, just to experiment. I ended up with the same OG I had last time I made this recipe, so I know this will be a winner!

[edit 6/30] Aaaannd it's gone again. Grrr! Must be something wrong with this particular recipe. I think it drinks itself when I'm not home. Can't explain the physics or fluid dynamics that seem to disproportionately negatively impact my Irish Red kegs. Maybe the beer molecules slowly cancel each other out? Looks like I'm going to have to rebrew.
 

skunkfunk

Well-Known Member
Joined
Nov 12, 2013
Messages
380
Reaction score
32
Location
Oklahoma City
Brewed this 5/31/2014. Here's my notes.

1 oz kent goldings @ 60 minutes (instead of as listed at the beginning of thread.)
Yeast: 2 packets saflager w-34/70

OG: 1.057 FG 1.010 IBU: ~20 ABV: 6%

Fermented & pitched @ 48F, followed brulosopher's quick lagering schedule with the exception of 5 weeks of lagering @ 32F. Carbed to 3.1 volumes, I believe.

My tasting: I brewed this on request for an Irish red from my father and begrudgingly did so; however, this beer turned out quite excellent. Excellent enough in fact that for my first time I'm actually posting about it in case anybody else wants to brew it. It has a somewhat weak malty aroma, not a lot going on there. The beer tastes smooth and has a slightly roasty finish. Not sweet, but full body despite the low mash temp.

Jon's tasting: I had a friend of mine give a little feedback. Well-balanced beer, but nothing stands out as spectacular. Malty but without much of a finish. Chilled for 10 minutes in the freezer and it foamed over when opened, not much carbonation retained in the glass. Overall, it's beer.
 

dokken5

Well-Known Member
Joined
Nov 14, 2014
Messages
86
Reaction score
13
This recipe calls for four months of aging. What is aging? How is it done in kegs vs bottles? Been brewing for a few months now, and have not yet come across anyone aging their beer.
 

rico567

Well-Known Member
Joined
Apr 28, 2008
Messages
3,016
Reaction score
99
Location
Central IL
This recipe calls for four months of aging. What is aging? How is it done in kegs vs bottles? Been brewing for a few months now, and have not yet come across anyone aging their beer.
Aging is taking the fermented beer and racking it into a carboy or other suitable container, for whatever period is suitable. I have aged barleywines, for example, as these beers pretty much require it. I have made this beer, but never aged it. I see no point.
 

pfgonzo

Well-Known Member
Lifetime Supporter
Joined
Oct 22, 2008
Messages
733
Reaction score
85
Location
San Francisco Bay Area
I agree with Rico. I make this beer several times a year, and it's ready to drink pretty quick.

I just brewed up a slightly stronger version of this recipe on Jan 17. Stayed in primary for about 14 days, cold crashed for a few days, kegged, carbed for 2 weeks (I go the slow carb route), and as soon as it starts pouring clear, you're good to go. Last night's pint was perfect, about 30 days from brew day.
 

dokken5

Well-Known Member
Joined
Nov 14, 2014
Messages
86
Reaction score
13
I disagree. This recipe goes from great to amazing right at the 4 month mark. I've made it 4 times so far. It's one of my favorites and definitely worth the wait.
So do you use an airlock during aging?
 

pfgonzo

Well-Known Member
Lifetime Supporter
Joined
Oct 22, 2008
Messages
733
Reaction score
85
Location
San Francisco Bay Area
Dokken, if you keg, you're better off transferring it to your keg, venting the O2 out, and letting it age there. You can bottle it too, but bulk aging results in more consistent flavors throughout the batch.

Either option is better than leaving it in a secondary for 4 months with an airlock (you're better off with a solid rubber bung). Whatever liquid you use in the airlock will allow O2 in, and you risk oxidation. Yooper posted a link to a study showing how easily airlock liquid allows gas transfer, I'll see if I can dig it up.

[Edit] Found it! https://www.homebrewtalk.com/f39/why-my-beer-getting-darker-age-471951/index3.html#post6323341 Feel free to read the entire thread, because it's educational. Here's Yooper's quote:

Even with an airlock on, the Ideal Gas Law applies, and if there was headspace in the carboy- oxidation is likely.

I know people who aren't scientists talk about the 'co2 blanket' that magically covers the beer- but it is a myth. The laws of physics still apply. Long term in a carboy is fine- but it must have 0 headspace and even then small amounts of oxidation occur. Oxygen even comes through the water (or other liquid) in the airlock, and the airlocks themselves allow air in, as do the bungs. Read the results of this study, geared towards Better Bottles, but this part is about the bungs/closures and oxygen uptake: http://www.mocon.com/pdf/optech/Closures - Oxygen Passage Study.pdf

Winemakers do age long term in a carboy, but they use antioxidants at racking, as well as employ techniques like 0 headspace in carboys.
 

dokken5

Well-Known Member
Joined
Nov 14, 2014
Messages
86
Reaction score
13
I see. Thanks guys!! This recipe is next on my list. Just ordered my grains.
 

BowAholic

Well-Known Member
Joined
Oct 26, 2014
Messages
770
Reaction score
82
Location
St Vincent
has anyone decided whether or not the 300L Roasted Barley is better than the 500L?
and...the yeast of choice is now British Ale II?
It would be awesome to hear the OP's thoughts on any changes he thinks makes this the best it can be after brewing it several times/ways...
thanks!
Bob
 

lowtones84

Well-Known Member
Joined
Oct 18, 2011
Messages
1,735
Reaction score
387
Location
Montclair
Thinking about brewing this. Not so sure about the Vienna component, I feel like I could get the effect by roasting some of the MO in the oven for about 15 minutes as it's not going to add much more color than MO, plus it just seems a little out of place for a UK beer.

Other than that it will be the same as the original, perhaps with a touch less roasted barley but a bit of melanoidin malt...that helps to get a reddish hue in my experience. And a clean ale yeast...so I guess a little different :p Still, looks like a great base idea!
 

dokken5

Well-Known Member
Joined
Nov 14, 2014
Messages
86
Reaction score
13
So I did this recipe, and I am ready to send it to the secondary. I got my lagering chamber done and am wanting to lager this, but I used US-05. Will that lager OK or am I just wasting my time?
 

zamo27

Well-Known Member
Joined
Apr 29, 2014
Messages
152
Reaction score
6
If I leave this in primary for 2 weeks, secondary with additional us-04 for 2 weeks
Then prime and bottle and leave for 2 months
Is that 3 moths like the OP suggests
 

zamo27

Well-Known Member
Joined
Apr 29, 2014
Messages
152
Reaction score
6
It suggested to age this beer for 3 months before drinking and add us-04 to secondary for clearing the beer
So will my attempt be good enough
 

skunkfunk

Well-Known Member
Joined
Nov 12, 2013
Messages
380
Reaction score
32
Location
Oklahoma City
It suggested to age this beer for 3 months before drinking and add us-04 to secondary for clearing the beer
So will my attempt be good enough
I'd say throw some gelatin in the primary and cold crash it to help that along. Shouldn't take 3 months.

Personally I lagered it a month without gelatin, and used w34/70 for the fermentation. Excellent beer.

Your way will probably work too. As is typical with brewing there's more than one way to skin the cat.
 

johnodonovan

Member
Joined
Feb 1, 2011
Messages
23
Reaction score
36
Location
goleta
I brewed a 10 gal batch of this. Took a corny to a bachelor party and it was a big hit :) One of my best brews to date. Thanks a lot for the recipe. It was definitely on the dark end of the style. Any suggestions on how to lighten up the color with minimal impact on that awesome roastiness at the end? Definitely brewing this one again!
 

pfgonzo

Well-Known Member
Lifetime Supporter
Joined
Oct 22, 2008
Messages
733
Reaction score
85
Location
San Francisco Bay Area
If you brewed it per the original recipe which calls for 12oz of 500L roasted barley, just back it off a little bit. I do 5-6 gallon batches and only use 2-3oz of roasted barley. In other words, I do half the recipe, but only use 1/3 to 1/4 of the roasted barley. You'd have to experiment to see how much color you extract on your system, but I'd start with dropping it to 6-7oz to see what you get.

It's a strong enough roast that the drop shouldn't impact the flavor in any significant way.
 

johnodonovan

Member
Joined
Feb 1, 2011
Messages
23
Reaction score
36
Location
goleta
Thanks! I think I did go heavy on the 500L. Will try your suggestion. I worry a bit because the flavor is perfect now. I'll do a taste test on both and report back (eventually)
Cheers!
 
Top