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Individual Bottle Priming Instructions with Cane Sugar

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Jonakr

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I never had a problem with batch priming. Kegging is even easier, though.
 
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TwistedGray

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Beautiful carb in my cider, thanks! Next time I will likely go with a touch more sugar (I tend to like my beers and ciders on the higher end of the carb levels) but I'm stoked with how it turned out. Now I just wish I bottled more than 10 bottles!

edit: forgot to ask this question:

You mentioned using brown sugar to carb as well. Have you tried this in a cider? I know there won't be any sweetness contributed but I'm wondering if it contributes any sort of a molasses flavor at all? Thanks again!
I have tried brown sugar but not a cider. The carbonation seemed identical, and you really couldn't tell much of a difference between the two beers (I think it was a brown ale). You're better of sticking to white, table sugar and adding whatever you want as an adjunct in my opinion.

Brown sugar should be ok - I used to use it quite a bit and can't remember any off notes from it.
But I did a stout years ago with a pound of black molasses at FO and it had a hint of blood in the finish that took away from the beer all the way to the end. No - didn't dump it over that - it was otherwise a great stout :)
Cheers!
Agreed.

I never had a problem with batch priming. Kegging is even easier, though.
Some of us prefer bottle conditioned beer (myself being one of those people).
 

kenmcchord

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So I'm a bit confused by the on line calculators and whatnot involved with bottle conditioning. I've been away from brewing a few years, and prior to that I was only kegging so I'm not very experienced at bottling. Now I'm back and have 6 gals of what hopes to be a nice IIPA SMaSH that just about ready for the keg/bottle.

I'd like to start kegging roughly 4 gals and then bottle the remaining 2 gallons. As these numbers are fairly imprecise it seems bottle priming might be my best solution. I visited the More Beer priming calculator and saw that the lowest calculation variable was measuring per gallon, and that there's a variable for fermentation temperature. So I plugged in the following...

Bottling two gallons at 80° fermentation for a 2.2 vol of CO2 = 49.01 grams of corn sugar (I'm in my garage and the temp is around 80° give or take)

Two gallons equals 256 ounces, which yields roughly eleven and a half 22 ounce bottles (11.63 bottles). If I divide the 49.01 grams over the 11.63 bottles, that should be 4.2 grams of corn sugar per 22 ounce bottle.

That seems a bit light as compared to the comments listed above. Am I doing something wrong? I could totally be screwing this up, and there may be a better on-line calculator that I'm not finding, so any advice would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks in advance!
 
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TwistedGray

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So I'm a bit confused by the on line calculators and whatnot involved with bottle conditioning. I've been away from brewing a few years, and prior to that I was only kegging so I'm not very experienced at bottling. Now I'm back and have 6 gals of what hopes to be a nice IIPA SMaSH that just about ready for the keg/bottle.

I'd like to start kegging roughly 4 gals and then bottle the remaining 2 gallons. As these numbers are fairly imprecise it seems bottle priming might be my best solution. I visited the More Beer priming calculator and saw that the lowest calculation variable was measuring per gallon, and that there's a variable for fermentation temperature. So I plugged in the following...

Bottling two gallons at 80° fermentation for a 2.2 vol of CO2 = 49.01 grams of corn sugar (I'm in my garage and the temp is around 80° give or take)

Two gallons equals 256 ounces, which yields roughly eleven and a half 22 ounce bottles (11.63 bottles). If I divide the 49.01 grams over the 11.63 bottles, that should be 4.2 grams of corn sugar per 22 ounce bottle.

That seems a bit light as compared to the comments listed above. Am I doing something wrong? I could totally be screwing this up, and there may be a better on-line calculator that I'm not finding, so any advice would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks in advance!
I would recommend 3/4tsp per 22oz bottle and not 1tsp as your calculations suggest.
 

z-bob

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4.6 grams of table sugar is about the right amount for a 22oz bomber. (two 2.3 gram sugar cubes) Corn sugar probably takes a little more, but not much more. And if you're using corn sugar you will want to weigh it because it's fluffy.

Just last week I weighed the sugar using several different kitchen measuring teaspoons and they were all different; some by quite a bit. I picked the one that was closest to the grams I wanted and used it. (it was the cheap stamped aluminum one I bought 30-ish years ago)
 

kenmcchord

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4.6 grams of table sugar is about the right amount for a 22oz bomber. (two 2.3 gram sugar cubes) Corn sugar probably takes a little more, but not much more. And if you're using corn sugar you will want to weigh it because it's fluffy.

Just last week I weighed the sugar using several different kitchen measuring teaspoons and they were all different; some by quite a bit. I picked the one that was closest to the grams I wanted and used it. (it was the cheap stamped aluminum one I bought 30-ish years ago)
Thanks for your input, I'll be measuring the weight of the sugar when it comes in tomorrow. The 4.6 grams sounds about right.

And thanks to @TwistedGray too. Here's to hoping for zero bottle bombs :bigmug:
 
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