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How to Grow Hops

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jerbrew

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I keep reading a lot about putting the rhisome in the ground or large pot for raised bed type growth. I can't decide which would be better and if I did a pot how big should I go (how small is too small)?
For a pot, go as big as you possibly can. A 20 gallon pot would be a minimum. I put my plants from Great Lakes Hops in 20 gallon pots last April and, although San Diego has an extended growing season, they grew through the bottom of the pot and digging around a bit I can see that the roots have wrapped themselves around the inside. They grow roots fast so give them room. Also, if you want to pot them make sure you have proper drainage in the bottom and you'll have to fertilize them more often then you might in the ground for the first couple months of their growth to coax them into growing big and strong.
 

BrianK3721

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I think i might of harvested my hops to early they started browning at the tips, sound like paper, they don't stay compressed when you squish them in your fingers, feel dry, they are sticky after handling about 20 or so not after just handling a few but they don't smell really strong and there's not as much lupin as I have seen in some videos, can anyone help? And if I did pick them to early what can I do with them, I would hate to throw them out!
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MIWI

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Hello to all. My son and I have been homebrewing for four years now. Every year we get a bit more diverse and now doing all grain with our own recipes. We have talked about growing some hops for a project. My son lives up by the WI/MI boarder. Looking for information as to type of hop for the area and being we are very low volume brewers of different types of beer and hops used is there some type of hops we should be looking at to plant? Is there a hop that is not the normally used that we may try so that other homebrewers would enjoy. We are not the strong IPA drinkers but have found some variety the make some good IPA brews. We are not looking at going into the hop business just a hoppy hobby!
Thanks for your help.
 

Kaz15

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What types of beers do you typically brew? My opinion is that growing aroma hops for pale ales and IPA will give a home grower the best bang for their buck and time and energy. Home growing hops for bittering a bit of a crapshoot, since you won’t know the exact AA of your hops.

Cascade isn’t the “sexiest” hop on the market these days, but it grows well just about everywhere. My cascade plant produces more hops in a season than I can use. Either way, the ability to brew a yearly wet hop ale makes it all more than worthwhile.

Growing something like Willamette or Goldings would be good if you like brewing darker or malt forward beers. That said, personally, I rarely use more than 2-3 oz of hops for a 5 gal batch of that style. So growing 1-2 lbs of willamette would be overkill for me.

If you’re interested in trying to grow something a little more “out there”. I’d suggest browsing Great Lakes Hops website. They have arguably the best selection of rooted plants available anywhere.


If you want to grow something unique for the pale ale/IPA category, the varieties that stand out to me are Multihead, Neo 1, Willow Creek, Cashmere, Triumph, Alpharoma and their heritage collection. It’s hard to know how any of those I named will perform in your part of the country, but you’ll never know till you try.

Hope that helps and best of luck!
 
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