Gulo ale

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Chrisbrewbeers

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Does this yeast get sulfurous?

I used Richmond VA tap water something possessed me to use 5 campden tabs over 9 gallons.

All grain 5 gallon batch
 

Mer-man

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That’s a lot of metabisulfate and it’s your fault, not the yeast. you might need to just dump the batch, if you’ve already pitched.

if you haven’t pitched, oxygenate/aerate like you’ve never done before and convert it all to sulfate
 

beersk

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I've used it for a bitter, dry stout, and an imperial stout. I did not get sulfur on any of them. It's a good yeast. Dries out really nicely and had an Irish ale character.
 
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Chrisbrewbeers

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I just poured first one and it’s good, that yeast might even be my new jam. I did pure oxygen it good though and normally I would have been more particular about the water but this was James river tap ran through a carbon block rather fast so it’s actually something I’ve never done before and it turned out good.
 

beersk

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Nice. I'm wanting to get some more of this and brew some really low abv beers with it, get it to dry out really nicely.
 

Brooothru

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I just poured first one and it’s good, that yeast might even be my new jam. I did pure oxygen it good though and normally I would have been more particular about the water but this was James river tap ran through a carbon block rather fast so it’s actually something I’ve never done before and it turned out good.
I've only used gulo once for an experimental Dry IPA. Worked great with a 1.003 FG finish. Uber dry, light body, fast finisher, but no residual sulfur. The yeast cleaned up after itself very nicely. Left a good, clean 400 ml harvest of itseft to boot! That much NaMeta may be giving off sulfur now, but give it a few days and I bet it will dissipate.

Brooo Brother
 

Brooothru

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An IPA finishing at 1.003 is hardly experimental :
http://barclayperkins.blogspot.com/2018/02/lets-brew-wednesday-1971-boddington-ip.html

(I've not tried it myself but Gulo sounds a good candidate for trying to recreate the legendary 1970s Boddies).
Your right, it's not "super" low, but lower that I normally get with Nottie or some other high attenuaters. On another dry beer I added some amyloglucodaise and drove the FG to 0.997. Now THAT was dry, but barely average for the wines I vint.

You mentioned Boddington's. In the past I've downed a few, but never got around to brewing a clone of it. Gulo might just be a good yeast to give it a go. Thanks for planting the seed in my mind.

Brooo Brother
 

Brooothru

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Your right, it's not "super" low, but lower that I normally get with Nottie or some other high attenuaters. On another dry beer I added some amyloglucodaise and drove the FG to 0.997. Now THAT was dry, but barely average for the wines I vint.

You mentioned Boddington's. In the past I've downed a few, but never got around to brewing a clone of it. Gulo might just be a good yeast to give it a go. Thanks for planting the seed in my mind.

Brooo Brother
Just a tag on to my previous post, does anyone know if Wyeast 1318 London Ale III is a diastaticus strain like Gulo? 1318 is supposed to be the Boddie yeast I think.

Thanks, Brooo Bro
 

thehaze

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1318 is not diastaticus. Its attenuation is well under 80%, ranging from 72 to 77%. But it's a well regarded, estery english yeast.
 

Brooothru

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1318 is not diastaticus. Its attenuation is well under 80%, ranging from 72 to 77%. But it's a well regarded, estery english yeast.
I didn't think so, but I've never brewed with it before. I gathered from @Northern Brewer's link that Boddinton finished at a low gravity, therefore it's yeast must be highly attenuative. Adding 2+2 together I got 5 and speculated that 1318 might be diastaticus. Not the first time I've reached a wrong conclusion.

The thread has gotten me excited about brewing a Boddie. Really used to like them, but it's been a while since I had one.

Brooo Brother
 

thehaze

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There are speculations saying that 1318 is not the real/original Boddies strain. They had a few or changed a few...
 

Northern_Brewer

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Just a tag on to my previous post, does anyone know if Wyeast 1318 London Ale III is a diastaticus strain like Gulo? 1318 is supposed to be the Boddie yeast I think.
There is no single "Boddies yeast". As a traditional British brewery they would have been using a multistrain that could have anything up to 10 or more strains in it, of all different kinds.

And at best the identification of 1318 is tenuous, no more than internet lore. The fact that it's called London Ale when Boddies was from Manchester 200 miles away is a pretty good hint to the contrary, but we just don't know. There's some story about Boddies losing their yeast and getting it from Courage, but who knows.

What we do know is that there's clearly three phases visible in the Boddies brewlogs - lower attenuation in the first half of the 20th century, crazy high attenuation from ~WWII until the 1970s, and then it drops again. Which suggests three different yeasts.There's a folk memory of Things Went Wrong at Boddies some time around 1979-81, which may be down to a number of factors, but a change to a less attenuating yeast may be one. Hence the interest in Gulo for recreating classic-era Boddies.
 

Comfort_Zone

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I've found that Gulo is a great yeast for when you want to finish at a low gravity without sacrificing body. It seems to produce a beer with more body than one might expect. Definitely not sulfurous though.
 

Brooothru

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I've found that Gulo is a great yeast for when you want to finish at a low gravity without sacrificing body. It seems to produce a beer with more body than one might expect. Definitely not sulfurous though.
That was not my experience, but I've only used it once, more of an experiment to see how low I could drive the final gravity. It certainly was a dry finish (0.997) and it's virtually impossible to have much body at such a low gravity. That said, it was supposed to be dry and light. Also, dosing with amylo was what really drove the SG that far down. The final body was a little on the thin side, but definitely not watery. I'm going to use Gulo/amylo in a Low carb, Low cal version of Cream of Three Crops for next summer (read: Michelob Ultra knockoff, but with taste and hopefully a little body).

Brooo Brother
 

Brooothru

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I really liked Gulo in a hazy IPA I made. Tried it in a Brut IPA and was a little funky for that.
Was the Gulo first generation or harvested from a previous brew session? My one encounter was a Brut IPA as well with Nelson and Hallertau Blanc. No funk at all, just bone dry with winey notes.

What temperature did you ferment at? I think mine was mid-50s. Maybe the amylo 'ate' the funk in my DryPA. I thought the fermentation was quite clean.

Brooo Brother
 

enkamania

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Was the Gulo first generation or harvested from a previous brew session? My one encounter was a Brut IPA as well with Nelson and Hallertau Blanc. No funk at all, just bone dry with winey notes.

What temperature did you ferment at? I think mine was mid-50s. Maybe the amylo 'ate' the funk in my DryPA. I thought the fermentation was quite clean.

Brooo Brother
It was first generation fermented in the upper 60’s.
 

cicquetto

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Omega Yeast recommends a temperature range from 20 °C to 25 °C.
at 20 °C the production of esters is abundant, I think it should be used at lower temperatures
 

Brooothru

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Omega Yeast recommends a temperature range from 20 °C to 25 °C.
at 20 °C the production of esters is abundant, I think it should be used at lower temperatures
I'll have to look back at my brew notes. I certainly don't think I fermented any higher than 13-14C/55-57F. As I recall Gulo is a diastaticus strain that has a wider temperature range, not unlike the Kveik yeasts. Since my goal was a dry IPL style I'm pretty sure I fermented well below 20C. That's what probably accounts for the lower esters.

Brooo Brother
 

Brooothru

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I'll have to look back at my brew notes. I certainly don't think I fermented any higher than 13-14C/55-57F. As I recall Gulo is a diastaticus strain that has a wider temperature range, not unlike the Kveik yeasts. Since my goal was a dry IPL style I'm pretty sure I fermented well below 20C. That's what probably accounts for the lower esters.

Brooo Brother
O.K., found it. Fermenter 10 days at 17C, free rise temperature to 24C over 5 days (D-rest), then -2C/day 'crash' to 3C, lager for 30 days.

OG 1.055, FG 0.997, ABV 7.5%. OYL-501 Gulo yeast 2L starter, 0.25 tsp each amylase enzyme and amyloglucodaise in the mash, 0.25 tsp amylo in primary fermentation. Hops: 0.25 oz Hallertau Magnum FWH, 1 oz each Nelson Sauvin and Hallertau Blanc @ :20 minute WP, 1 oz each Nelson and Hallertau Blanc @ 5 days dry hop.

Virtually no fruity esters, definite yet subtle white wine notes, so bone-dry a dog wouldn't bury it! Actually a pretty nice experimental beer.

Brooo Brother
 
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sweetcell

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I've found that Gulo is a great yeast for when you want to finish at a low gravity without sacrificing body. It seems to produce a beer with more body than one might expect.
Gulo is a genetic hybrid of French Saison (3711) and an irish ale yeast. like french saison, gulo produces high amount of glycerol - that's what is creating the mouthfeel despite the attenuation.
 

beersk

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Gulo is a genetic hybrid of French Saison (3711) and an irish ale yeast. like french saison, gulo produces high amount of glycerol - that's what is creating the mouthfeel despite the attenuation.
That is interesting. I liked this yeast when I did a string of beers with it. Ferments fast, vigorous, and doesn't really need temp control (70's is fine) and dries out very nicely. I used it primarily in British styles and an imperial stout.
 

Gusso

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I have a Biere de Garde fermenting right now with Gulo. It went from 1.069 to 1.010 in 48 hours but slowed after that. It's almost a week and slowed considerably but still going. Currently sitting at 1.004. I can't see getting much lower than this. I'll probably naturally carb in a keg in a few days. That yeast is a beast!
 

sweetcell

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i made two batches of API with Gulo recently. solid yeast, although the high glycerol thing is something i associate with saisons so it's a bit strange to have it in a hoppy american ale. i like Gulo but not enough for it to replace my go-to yeasts for IPAs. i'm sure i'll be picking up another pack at some point, if only for the change of pace it provides - or maybe i'll try it in a different style.
 

Gusso

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I have a Biere de Garde fermenting right now with Gulo. It went from 1.069 to 1.010 in 48 hours but slowed after that. It's almost a week and slowed considerably but still going. Currently sitting at 1.004. I can't see getting much lower than this. I'll probably naturally carb in a keg in a few days. That yeast is a beast!
Finished at 1.003. Naturally carbed, just waiting for kegerator space. I'm looking forward to tasting it.
 
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