German IPA Recipe?

Homebrew Talk - Beer, Wine, Mead, & Cider Brewing Discussion Forum

Help Support Homebrew Talk:

Brew-Happy

Well-Known Member
Joined
May 27, 2008
Messages
1,324
Reaction score
9
Location
Lubbock, Texas
Been thinking again (and searching) about IPA's, especially with sales and availability up. This idea came from an all Fuggle IPA I had (Shipyard IPA). Tho in my case I would use a higher AA German hop.

Has anyone ever done an IPA that wasn't American or English? Can't find any recipes such as a German IPA with Saaz.

Current recipe configuration:

German IPA

2gal batch

2lbs Light DME
0.5lb Caravienne(mashed)
0.5lb German Munich(mashed)
0.5lb German Vienna(mashed)

Grains mashed at 150*F for 60mins(starch test)

0.5oz [email protected]
0.5oz [email protected]
0.5oz [email protected]
0.5oz [email protected]
0.5oz [email protected]

Yeast: ? (maybe Safbrew T-58 for spicy character)Looking to use dry for $savings

OG: 1.065
FG: 1.016
Color: 12*
Bitterness: 51

So any thoughts? If this would work, I would consider IPA's from other regions as well: Ex: French IPA (rude and aromatic)

Personally, I am not familiar with most of the ingredients, but it would be fun experimenting. And in the end, it is still beer. :)
 

the_bird

10th-Level Beer Nerd
Lifetime Supporter
Joined
May 21, 2006
Messages
20,964
Reaction score
599
Location
Adams, MA
In the end, it's beer.

There really isn't a "German IPA," per se, at least that I'm aware of. There are some Belgian IPAs around that might be in the vein of what you're thinking about. I might consider using a high-quality Pilsner extract rather than the generic DME. I don't think I'd use the T-58, I'd be afraid the pheonolics would conflict with the hops that you're trying to highlight. You could also think about splitting out the hop additions with Tettnag and/or Hallertau in addition to/instead of the Saaz; Saaz is a great hop, but there's a lot of really nice noble hops.
 
OP
Brew-Happy

Brew-Happy

Well-Known Member
Joined
May 27, 2008
Messages
1,324
Reaction score
9
Location
Lubbock, Texas
In the end, it's beer.

There really isn't a "German IPA," per se, at least that I'm aware of. There are some Belgian IPAs around that might be in the vein of what you're thinking about. I might consider using a high-quality Pilsner extract rather than the generic DME. I don't think I'd use the T-58, I'd be afraid the pheonolics would conflict with the hops that you're trying to highlight. You could also think about splitting out the hop additions with Tettnag and/or Hallertau in addition to/instead of the Saaz; Saaz is a great hop, but there's a lot of really nice noble hops.
the_bird,

Thanks for the heads up on some of the ingredients. AHS doesn't seem to have Pilsen extract, but they do have a Munich/2row blend. Might have to consider that one. Now that I look at the grain bill, I might switch out either the Munich or Vienna with Pilsen malt. Try to lighten the malt flavor and color a bit.

I did come across SafAle K-97 dry yeast that has low esters and is German.

Right now this is a work in progress. Much appreciated.
 

HOOTER

Well-Known Member
Joined
Mar 7, 2008
Messages
1,653
Reaction score
15
Location
Spokane, WA
I think your looking for a "Sticke alt". Here's the BJCP description:

Common variants include Sticke (“secret”) alt, which is slightly stronger, darker, richer and more complex than typical alts. Bitterness rises up to 60 IBUs and is usually dry hopped and lagered for a longer time.
Northern Brewer has a Super alt kit that looks similar to what your looking for.
 
OP
Brew-Happy

Brew-Happy

Well-Known Member
Joined
May 27, 2008
Messages
1,324
Reaction score
9
Location
Lubbock, Texas
I think your looking for a "Sticke alt". Here's the BJCP description:



Northern Brewer has a Super alt kit that looks similar to what your looking for.
That is similar, but I am hoping to keep the color and maltiness light. Interestingly, the BJCP description says it's a lager and the NB description uses an ale yeast. When I get to this I will be fermenting in the mid to upper 60's.

As a recipe, I am now down to Light DME, Pilsen malt, and Vienna malt. Simple and hoppy.
 

the_bird

10th-Level Beer Nerd
Lifetime Supporter
Joined
May 21, 2006
Messages
20,964
Reaction score
599
Location
Adams, MA
I'd bite the bullet and use a liquid yeast; maybe a Kölsch. German ale yeast that's used (I believe) in altbiers, which is probably the closest to what you're designing. Ferment it a little cool (60°), IIRC. It's a clean ale yeast.

It could be really good. I'd still stick with the liquid pils extract, mash a little Vienna if you want (or not, German receipes tend to have simple grainbills), use the Kolsch yeast, and hop it with classic noble hops like your Saaz and your Tettnag. Almost like a super-pils, but with a clean ale yeast and jacked up hopping. Keep the beer dry like an IPA should be, limited use of any crystal-type malts.
 

Teacher

Well-Known Member
Joined
Sep 8, 2007
Messages
542
Reaction score
8
Location
Grand Forks, ND, USA
Morebeer also has Pilsner LME. I'd also agree with getting rid of the T-58. Use a Koelsch or altbier yeast, or just use something clean like Nottingham. Have fun!
 

HOOTER

Well-Known Member
Joined
Mar 7, 2008
Messages
1,653
Reaction score
15
Location
Spokane, WA
Interestingly, the BJCP description says it's a lager and the NB description uses an ale yeast. When I get to this I will be fermenting in the mid to upper 60's.
No, the BJCP description says it's "lagered" which essentially means aged. The word "alt" means old, reffering to the old way of making beer in Germany using top fermenting yeast, before the discovery of bottom fermenting lager strains. Sticke alt is the closest the Germans ever came to an IPA, but I'm sure you can come up with a recipe that's lighter and less malty.
 

romanalex1

Member
Joined
Jul 13, 2009
Messages
5
Reaction score
0
Location
New york city
Other than English/American Ipa's, i've only had a belgian brigand IPA which is ok, not bad but certianly not a hop bom such as a stone ruination, or smuttynose (my fav's).
 
Top