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Gelatin Finings

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d_m_s_00

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Has anyone used them? I picked up a brewing equipment kit and it included a jar of powdered Gallatin for fining. I guess I wondering how to use it... the directions say

(To clear wine and beer. Use 1/2 tsp. per gallon for beer and 1 tsp per gallon for wine. 1. Add gelatine fining material to 1/2 c. to 1 c. of cold water and let soak for 1 hour. 2. Stir vigorously. 3. JUST bring it to a boil, either on the stove or in a microwave, then remove from heat. 4. Let stand for 3 minutes then stir mixture into beer or wine and let clear for 10 to 15 days)

So I guess this is done in the secondary, let it clear, then bottle? Also, since I bottle my beer, what will this do to the yeast?
 

Kaiser

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Yes, it's done after the primary fermentation is done. If you plan to bottle condition you may need to add new yeast.

But, since you just started, I would not worry about this step until you have the more essential parts of the process under control.

Kai
 

TexLaw

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I've used gelatin for fining, but I rarely do nowadays. It does take a good week or two off your normal clearing time, but I'm usually happy to let the beer sit until clear.


TL
 

BierMuncher

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The directions they offered are spot on. I use gelatin with all my ales that are not dark.

I also keg and force carb. If you're bottling, I'd refrain from using gelatin right away, as it can clear your beer of so much yeast that carbonation is severely retarded.

I'd focus on getting the brewing, fermentation and bottling aspects down before moving on to finings for your beer.

If you insist on using it, add it to the secondary as it's being filled. When you bottle, pitch about 1/2 packet of rehydrated yeast into the bottling bucket and follow normal bottling processes.
 
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