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killian

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I have been thinking for a while that my measurements were off some how and when I last made my sanitizer using 5- 1 gallon jugs of distilled water I found that the measurement marking on the side of my true brew bucket was really low. Im thinking that some one selling a gallon of water would be pretty accurate with their measurements. Now I think I have to remark all of my buckets. Any one ever check the measurement of an Ale pail?
 

McKBrew

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Don't assume that your ale pail is the problem in question. When I was marking my better bottles for the first time I used a store 1-gallon water jug. I found out that it was off. The best thing you can do is buy a decent measuring cup from a reliable manufacturer. Use that to measure out a gallon in a jug and mark the outside at the 1 gallon mark.
 

rsmith179

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That's what I did as well. I have a 4L pitcher that I used to measure out .5 gallons at a time. I acutually have not done this with my buckets, but I have measured out for my carboys. After it was all measured in .5 gallon increments, I then market and etched the markings into my glass carboy. I actually saw another post on here about etching carboys and had to do it as soon as I got home. Turned out great and now I know EXACTLY how much liquid is in my carboys.
 

bull8042

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Don't assume that your ale pail is the problem in question. When I was marking my better bottles for the first time I used a store 1-gallon water jug. I found out that it was off. The best thing you can do is buy a decent measuring cup from a reliable manufacturer. Use that to measure out a gallon in a jug and mark the outside at the 1 gallon mark.
100% agree! I thought the same thing until I accurately measured 1 gallon into a jug and realized the all of them are "over-filled" originally.
 

dstar26t

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If you want accurate volume measurements for water, take it's temp and weigh it. I've never found an accurately marked vessel to measure the volume. Weighing it is pretty damn accurate. Use this chart I made to find the weight vs. temperature. You have a digital scale for grain and hops right?
 

bmckee56

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If you want accurate volume measurements for water, take it's temp and weigh it. I've never found an accurately marked vessel to measure the volume. Weighing it is pretty damn accurate. Use this chart I made to find the weight vs. temperature. You have a digital scale for grain and hops right?
Yep, this is the best way to be accurate! 8.33lb per gallon w/temp adjustment.

Salute! :mug:
 

dstar26t

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Of course we're assuming our thermometers and scales are accurate, which is a whole different story.
 

samc

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How far off would the measurements be for distilled, RO or tap water of varying hardness?
I usually weigh my water for recipes (pizza) but my scale does not go beyond 11 pounds so I don't do it for brewing.
 

conpewter

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I just used my 2L Erlenmeyer flask, figured out how many ML in a half gallon, marked that on the glass and measure everything by the half gallon.
 

Kronin

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pi X radius squared X hieght will give you the cubic whatevers of a cylinder like your pot or a jug, assuming it is not tapered and is straight up and down.

in my case, 3.14 x (17.75cm x 17.75cm) x 33 cm = 32647 cubic centimeters. or 32.647 liters is what my pot will hold if i fill it right to the top edge. (one cubic cm is one milliliter)
 
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killian

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If you want accurate volume measurements for water, take it's temp and weigh it. I've never found an accurately marked vessel to measure the volume. Weighing it is pretty damn accurate. Use this chart I made to find the weight vs. temperature. You have a digital scale for grain and hops right?
this looks pretty simple thanks
 

fratermus

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The best thing you can do is buy a decent measuring cup from a reliable manufacturer.
I find it easiest/fastest to weigh water when checking bucket levels. Tare the bucket out, add the water.
 

JVD_X

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I don't even bother with the complications. I took my 5 gallon secondary and filled it almost all the way up with water leaving about an inch of head space. Then I got my auto siphon and put it in and took it out to compensate for the space it uses when you put it in and that is my "5 gallons".

THEN I took that "5 gallons" and poured it into my 6+ gallon primaries... and marked where it came up to... there is my five gallon line - I don't care if it's EXACTLY five gallons - I am not that good that two quarts makes a big difference in my beers.
 

Kronin

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I don't even bother with the complications. I took my 5 gallon secondary and filled it almost all the way up with water leaving about an inch of head space. Then I got my auto siphon and put it in and took it out to compensate for the space it uses when you put it in and that is my "5 gallons".

THEN I took that "5 gallons" and poured it into my 6+ gallon primaries... and marked where it came up to... there is my five gallon line - I don't care if it's EXACTLY five gallons - I am not that good that two quarts makes a big difference in my beers.
+1 for that. very good point. if it is close it will be good, and the fact you marked it means whatever you do is repeatable.
 
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killian

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Im trying to get my numbers down exactly for mash thickness, sparge water & loss form dead space under false bottom etc...
 

JVD_X

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Im trying to get my numbers down exactly for mash thickness, sparge water & loss form dead space under false bottom etc...
I see - I generally just boil down and periodically take reading with my refractometer. When I reach my target gravity - any time past 60 minutes - I stop the boil. I would rather reach my target gravity and have less wort then have 5 gallons which is not target gravity. This is because you can always boil some extract to top up your fermenter to 5 gallons or whatever.
 
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