Early Fermentation Oxidization

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abraxas

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I brewed a batch and due to an equipment issue, I was forced to put the batch into an empty cornnelius keg with a airlock. Would there be problems if I racked it into a carboy 16 hours after the beer has started fermenting in the primary.

I know you want to limit the introduction of oxygen after the fermentation has begun, but at this point in the stage, won't CO2 formation drive off oxygen quickly enough to avoid any serious oxidization flavor effect? Are there other factors I should be concerned about (aside from infection)?
 
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abraxas

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As I think about this a little more, I suppose this would increase the early fermentation byproducts. I'd rather not have a heavy diacytal flavor in my Irish Stout....
 

david_42

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16 hours, the yeast is probably still growing. You should be fine.
 

malkore

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honestly, if fermentation has started, I'd just leave it in the corny until primary ends and terminal gravity is reached. then rack to secondary to reclaim the keg.
 

Funkenjaeger

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I was told by a representative of wyeast that it is not a problem to oxygenate during fermentation, as long as fermentation is still active so that the yeast will use up the oxygen quickly so that it's not still there when fermentation subsides. He said a good safe rule of thumb was that you would most likely be safe adding oxygen as long as you hadn't yet reached HALF of your expected attenuation (ie - the midway point between your OG and your expected FG).

Besides, unless your batch is particularly small and/or you're using foam control, you're probably going to get some messy blowoff fermenting in something as small as a corny keg, so I'd want to get it out of there into a suitably-sized fermenter ASAP.
 
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abraxas

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Funkenjaeger said:
I was told by a representative of wyeast that it is not a problem to oxygenate during fermentation, as long as fermentation is still active so that the yeast will use up the oxygen quickly so that it's not still there when fermentation subsides. He said a good safe rule of thumb was that you would most likely be safe adding oxygen as long as you hadn't yet reached HALF of your expected attenuation (ie - the midway point between your OG and your expected FG).

Besides, unless your batch is particularly small and/or you're using foam control, you're probably going to get some messy blowoff fermenting in something as small as a corny keg, so I'd want to get it out of there into a suitably-sized fermenter ASAP.

Interesting. This makes me think that it one is brewing a big enough beer without pure O2, then it would be advisable to open the top up and provide a second manual aeration after a day or two since it is impossible to reach optimal O2 levels by shaking, stirring or pumping air alone....
 
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