Cold Break

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corax

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I've never worried about cold break material in the fermenter. I've always used a counter-flow chiller, and gone straight from the kettle to the fermenter. Primary ferment rarely exceeds 7-10 days. I've only ever brewed ales, and would likely continue that for the foreseeable future.

The question is, if I adopt LoDo methods, is there any reason to be more concerned about cold break? I suppose I could rig my pump for recirculation/whirlpool at the end of the boil, but is it really worth the extra fuss and added oxidation risk (ie. cavitation, leaky valves, etc)?
 

MSK_Chess

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gee i dunno what to suggest cause I use an immersion chillers and most of the stuff gets left in the kettle. Is it possible to chill using your counter flow chiller but into an intermediary and once all the cold break has settled out transfer it into fermenter?
 

day_trippr

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I don't believe there's a LoDO beef with cold break in the fermentor, but it's possible I missed that detail.

I'd think recirculation with the BK return under the surface wouldn't pose a big LoDO issue, presuming the loop had been liquid purged prior. Loop to pitching temperature then let everything rest for 10-20 minutes before filling the fermentor(s).

Cheers!
 

MSK_Chess

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its quite interesting, the low oxygen brewing website has an article entitled, Trub separation, why and how? in which it cites reasons for and against trub separation according to certain publications authored by well respected brewing scientists. Against is the idea that cloudy wort contains a lot of fatty acids which contribute to stalling and work against foam stability. For is that yeast use fatty acids to build biomass. In practice its almost impossible not to get some carry over into the fermentation vessel much in the same way that yeast will carry over when transferring. I think i read an article by one of the LODO guys in which he uses an intermediary to precipitate out any break and then transfer to FV. I have found in my own practice this is not necessary as the break is fairly compact and I get pretty good clarity just leaving it to settle out in the kettle before transferring to FV. Here is a link to the article should anyone feel inclined.

http://www.********************/brewing-methods/trub-seperation-why-and-how/
 

Hannabrew

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Besides the stalling and stability concerns, shooting for clear wort in both the BK and the FV assist in reducing the time needed for brite beer.

Additionally if you harvest yeast you've made your job as simple as pouring the trub into a jar.

I try to keep it as clear as possible but I've found in order to really get it totally clear in the FV I either have to assume up to 1.5G of loss in the kettle or do that intermediary step (which is a pita for me) so I don't sweat it if a bit gets in.
 
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gee i dunno what to suggest cause I use an immersion chillers and most of the stuff gets left in the kettle. Is it possible to chill using your counter flow chiller but into an intermediary and once all the cold break has settled out transfer it into fermenter?
I use a CFC to whirlpool and chill. The whirlpool creates a nice pile of any trub in the center of the BK so that when I transfer to fermentors almost all of the trub is left in the BK.
This method also helps eliminate “crap” in my CFC.
 

MSK_Chess

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I use a CFC to whirlpool and chill. The whirlpool creates a nice pile of any trub in the center of the BK so that when I transfer to fermentors almost all of the trub is left in the BK.
This method also helps eliminate “crap” in my CFC.
So do you just pump it through the counterflow chiller back into the kettle and let it whirpool the trub into the center? seems like a winning strategy! Panic over, problem solved!
 
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Yes. I have an angled pickup in the BK for flow to my pump. The return goes through a Spin Cycle (Brew Hardware) and puts the pump back into the BK just a few inches above the bottom.
Works very well.
 
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If you go this route you might consider putting a SS ball valve on the return at the Spin Cycle to prevent any siphoning. Also you’ll find that the mound of trub will drop down at about 80°F
 

Dland

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One other thing to clear the wort before pumping though CFC is to run it though a kettle with late addition steeping hops. I do this sometimes and it clears any solids that make it past the torpedo screen in bottom of BK after whirlpool.

I use my MT after I dump and rinse the spent grain out. Gravity down from BK, pump though CFC into fermenter on rolling table in cellar.
 
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corax

corax

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I decided to just get a stainless steel immersion chiller. Lately I've been really trying to simplify my process and do as much as possible by gravity. While I could conceivably rig up a recirculating whirlpool with my CFC and pump, it would be the opposite of simplification.
 
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