Belgian Golden Strong Ale Belgian Brother Golden Strong

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A2HB

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Going to brew this next week for my first Beligian ale as soon as my fermenter is cleared out. This recipe looks like a winner, can't wait to getter dun
 

A2HB

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Well I just finished brewing this recipe. I followed all the instructions and somehow ended up with OG of 1.088. Not a bad problem I guess :)

For yeast I'm using 2 packets of T-58.

We'll see how this turns out in about 2 months

Hope everyone had a great National Homebrewing Day!
 

A2HB

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Two hours later and the T-58 is beasting! Two inch krausen has formed and machine gun blow off tube popping. Off to a great start on this
 

Natarch519

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Brewed this yesterday and I forgot about adding the yeast nutrient to the boil. Used Trappist High Gravity (Wyeast Labs #3787). Will I have issues with fermentation or will it just be a longer time in primary?
 

TimpanogosSlim

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Brewed this yesterday and I forgot about adding the yeast nutrient to the boil. Used Trappist High Gravity (Wyeast Labs #3787). Will I have issues with fermentation or will it just be a longer time in primary?
I don't think the nutrient is really necessary, particularly if you used a starter instead of just pitching the yeast as-is from the packet.

If you're worried, pitch another packet. But if fermentation kicked off and is running, my guess is it will probably be fine.

You can even boil a couple cups water in the microwave with the yeast nutrient and add it now.

The idea is to reduce the stress on the yeast, so that they work cleaner.

People like to think (and people who sell live yeast like to claim) that live yeast gives you a better shot at good fermentation but really the only actual appeal of live yeast is that there are so many varieties. Dry yeast is superior in almost every way -- it's just that the investment required to develop a dry yeast product doesn't make sense for all but the most popular yeasts, since the process has to be tweaked for each strain, and some strains are more adaptable than others.

The hard facts are that a packet of dry yeast typically contains more viable cells than a 1L starter made from a packet of live yeast. But care does have to be taken to hydrate the yeast properly for maximum effect. The experts say that it should be added to water that's got some minerals in it (hard tap water or bottled 'mineral' water -- NOT distilled water) at room temperature. Just sprinkled on the top and allowed to absorb the water. With no sugars added.

You have to wake them from their deep slumber gently is the thing. Distilled water soaks into them too fast and doesn't bring anything but itself to the party. If they try to eat before they are awake they get sick. So just any water that you yourself would drink. At room temperature.

But that said, the yeast you used is a good choice for this one.
 

maurtis

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Brewed up this one over the weekend, but was not paying attention and just did a 60 minute boil. Since hop schedule in the recipe works for a 60 minute boil, what would that affect other than possibly clarity?

I hit my OG number at 1.063, but that is probably because I tend to throw in some extra DME to make up for BIAB inefficiencies. But this time my pre-boil gravity was spot on, but I still threw in the extra DME since I already had it with me. Looks like that saved my gravity, but how will the shorter boil affect the end product?

I should have been tipped off by the extra amount of wort still left in the keggle with the hot break material after transferring to the fermenter, but thought nothing of it until re-reading the recipe just now looking for the temperature ramp up schedule.
 

maurtis

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Ah, I see... DMS. According to an article on Beersmith's site:

"The half-life for DMS is 40 minutes, so half of the DMS will be boiled off in a 40 minute vigorous boil. So if we do the math, a 60 minute boil gets rid of 64.7% of the DMS and a 90 minute boil rids us of 79% of the DMS. That is why most experienced brewers recommend a 90 minute or longer vigorous boil."

From what I have read (especially with pilsners) some homebrewers can taste the extra DMS left from a 60 minute boil vs 90 and some cannot. Oh well, it might end up being a Golden Strong Corn instead, LOL. We will see :tank:
 

m00ps

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Ive never experienced any issue with DMS using pilsner as a base malt. That is over an estimated +70 batches of pilsner based beers with a 60min boil
 

maurtis

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Ive never experienced any issue with DMS using pilsner as a base malt. That is over an estimated +70 batches of pilsner based beers with a 60min boil
Wow that is a lot of homebrew :) Thanks for the ray of hope.
 

winvarin

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Ah, I see... DMS. According to an article on Beersmith's site:



"The half-life for DMS is 40 minutes, so half of the DMS will be boiled off in a 40 minute vigorous boil. So if we do the math, a 60 minute boil gets rid of 64.7% of the DMS and a 90 minute boil rids us of 79% of the DMS. That is why most experienced brewers recommend a 90 minute or longer vigorous boil."



From what I have read (especially with pilsners) some homebrewers can taste the extra DMS left from a 60 minute boil vs 90 and some cannot. Oh well, it might end up being a Golden Strong Corn instead, LOL. We will see :tank:

90 min boil plus a quick chill will cure most DMS issues. I can't remember the exact break point but I want to say it's around 100f when SMM (the DMS precursor) will stop converting to DMS. So a longer, vigorous boil plus dropping your wort below 100f quickly will usually avoid issues.
 

tgmartin000

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90 min boil plus a quick chill will cure most DMS issues. I can't remember the exact break point but I want to say it's around 100f when SMM (the DMS precursor) will stop converting to DMS. So a longer, vigorous boil plus dropping your wort below 100f quickly will usually avoid issues.
158 degrees.
 
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