ANVIL FOUNDRY ALL-GRAIN BREWING SYSTEM

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Fluffhead

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You don't necessarily have to change the plug on the cord. You can make an adapter cord with an inline gfi and use any type of electric stove or electric dryer connector.
Can you elaborate a little more on this? Is there an adapter available that accomplishes this or would it have to be made? I'm interested in the foundry and 240v, but have little to no electrical knowledge/skill and am intimidated by the prospect of doing it myself.
 

tracer bullet

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Can you elaborate a little more on this? Is there an adapter available that accomplishes this or would it have to be made? I'm interested in the foundry and 240v, but have little to no electrical knowledge/skill and am intimidated by the prospect of doing it myself.
It needs to be made. It's not too tough but you should have a basic understanding of things and be at least a little handy.

It needs to be made because - it's not exactly 100% legit.
 

Grizwold1

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If you do not need to switch between 120 & 240 you can cut off the existing plug and wire in one for 220. Then change the switch to 240. It is under a small shield on the bottom of the unit. IIRC there are instructions for this in the Anvil user manual. I chose to go the adapter route to preserve options.
 

cmac62

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Knightshade

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Yeah... ditto to the two above posts.
I made one myself.
I have wired 110v basic before but was afraid of 240.. but it is pretty easy.
In this thread is all the info you will need!!
Doing any type of wiring in general scares the bajeebers out of me. I'll repair/replace a standard 110, wire up a ceiling fan...but that is about it. I had an electrician install a 240 circuit..then wired up this. Damn thing is sealed...so even if I do spill another layer of safety for me.

IMG_3295.jpeg


via this:


which was only around $80 when I ordered it way back...current price is stupid ridiculous.
 
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Cammanron

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Wow. Things are so much cheaper in the states. I saw this on an American website for $369. On a Canadian website $665 … and sold out
 

cmac62

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doug293cz

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DarrellQ

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I had this made with GFCI. Works great!

Finally, an inexpensive solution for getting GFCI protection at 240 volts. These folks custom made this with a NEMA 6P on one end and NEMA 6R on the other. All for $69.99 with a 3 day turn around. Great folks to work with. https://shop.worldcordsets.com/shop

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DarrellQ

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This is not a 240V plug to 120V receptacle adapter. This is a 4-wire 50A 240V to 3-wire 50A 240V adapter.

Brew on :mug:
I had this made with GFCI, works great!

Finally, an inexpensive solution for getting GFCI protection at 240 volts. These folks custom made this with a NEMA 6P on one end and NEMA 6R on the other. All for $69.99 with a 3 day turn around. Great folks to work with. https://shop.worldcordsets.com/shop

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Horace

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I like this approach. A lot. Stick a true 240V plug onto the Anvil itself, and then if / when 120 is needed, adapt "down" to it (and of course flip the switch on the unit itself).
Yep, switch flipping is the wildcard. I’m not sure what internal protection there is, if any, so I have reminders zip tied to all plugs. I’m old.
 

renstyle

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tracer bullet

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The receptacle on this is an L5-30R, which is 120V. The 240V version is the L6-30R. They are not interchangeable (but they do look a lot alike.)

Brew on :mug:
I think that's the idea. You cut the stock supplied plug form the Anvil, and wire up a 240V plug instead. Which you normally plug right into your 240V outlet.

If / when you decide to move to a 120V outlet, take it to a friend's house, etc. You use that adapter to "convert" your 240V plug back down to 120 temporarily.

That's how I'm seeing it - if that's the idea proposed, I like it. If a mistake is made it's in the safer direction. Someone else in the house accidentally plugs a clothes dryer into a normal outlet (unlikely) vs. someone plugs a toaster into the 240V outlet to see if it toasts faster.
 

doug293cz

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I think that's the idea. You cut the stock supplied plug form the Anvil, and wire up a 240V plug instead. Which you normally plug right into your 240V outlet.

If / when you decide to move to a 120V outlet, take it to a friend's house, etc. You use that adapter to "convert" your 240V plug back down to 120 temporarily.

That's how I'm seeing it - if that's the idea proposed, I like it. If a mistake is made it's in the safer direction. Someone else in the house accidentally plugs a clothes dryer into a normal outlet (unlikely) vs. someone plugs a toaster into the 240V outlet to see if it toasts faster.
Yeah, that's the idea, but the linked adapter isn't the correct one. Both ends are 120V.

Brew on :mug:
 

renstyle

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I can see the safety aspect of removing the NEMA-5 120V plug that comes standard on the Foundry to obviate the possibility of the kettle being plugged into a 120V outlet while the switch was still set to 240V... that being said from what I've read, accidentally plugging the stock Foundry kettle into 120V this way will not damage the unit, just run at reduced power.

On the flip side, having a 240V plug attached to the Foundry could leave you with the possibility of plugging the unit into 240V while switched to 120V. This I could see causing an issue potentially damaging the unit. (Please, by all means correct me if I'm off on my thinking here)!

It seemed simpler to make a GFI adapter cable that did all the things and allowed the kettle cord to remain stock.

I suppose it's 6-in-one, half-dozen in the other. Having the 240V GFI protection, whether in-line, or via a dedicated 240V breaker in the panel is the main takeaway.
 
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renstyle

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If you put a 220v plug on you can purchase a 220 to 110 adaptor and be legit. You can toggle the switch by using a flat blade through the side instead of removing cover.
To be "legit" the 240-to-120V adapter will need to be plugged into a 240V outlet (dryer, spa, et. al) that is supplied by a GFCI breaker in the panel.

Some folks have whipped up a "spa/breaker" adapter box which runs between your regular dryer/spa outlet and the Foundry.

As it is an "adapter cord" for all intents and purposes, it's in the same gray area as using the in-line yellow SouthWire GFI in a custom "adapter cord".

When using 240V around this much water it's imperative to use a GFI. Changing the gender/format of the plug is only half the battle.
 

snookluvr

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Basically, any 240V plug should be GFCI protected under the new code. It's the right thing to do anyway for safety.

I'll probably get the Anvil system when it's available. My panel is in the garage so it's easy for me to add the appropriate 240V GFCI circuit. That's where I'll be doing the brewing anyway. Cut off the plug and add the correct 240V one, NEMA 6-20P, I believe.
 

doug293cz

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Basically, any 240V plug should be GFCI protected under the new code. It's the right thing to do anyway for safety.

I'll probably get the Anvil system when it's available. My panel is in the garage so it's easy for me to add the appropriate 240V GFCI circuit. That's where I'll be doing the brewing anyway. Cut off the plug and add the correct 240V one, NEMA 6-20P, I believe.
The correct plug is the one that matches the 240V outlet you plan to use.

Brew on :mug:
 

doug293cz

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Yep, I see it now.
I tried to upload the NEMA document that shows the different plug/receptacle specs, but it's too big for HBT (14MB.) The number of different options is mind boggling.

You can find the document here, but I think you have to sign up for a free NEMA logon to access the page.

Brew on :mug:
 

Nate R

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+1!
This needs to be in flashing lights!!
When using 240V around this much water it's imperative to use a GFI. Changing the gender/format of the plug is only half the battle.
I am ashamed to admit i did not think about the reverse wiring (as stated above) BUT for thoose of us using dryer outlets... since thoose sockets do not have GFCI i think having the 240v male to gfci to 110v female may be the safest overall. Just gotta tag the heck out of it so no one else uses it.
Also- i appreciate that my Anvil Factory sealed male plug is intact. If i lend it to a friend they can use a regular outlet.
My $0.02
 

RufusBrewer

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I have a Foundry 10.5 g and considered all the combinations of sockets and switch positions and "what if it is plugged into . . ." scenarios. What ever you do, if you do not pay attention you can give the unit 240 in the 120 position.

Most likely to happen is you are using it at 120 for one session. Next session you change to a 240 plug and forget to switch the Foundry over to 240 operation.

What are you going to do? What can you do?

Best habit is switch your Foundry to 240 before you swap plugs.
 

DrWill

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This adapter fits the 220v plug in my house. Is there a reason I couldn't cut it in the middle and wire the GFCI breaker in?

Full disclosure: I am nearly electrically incompetent.
 

Knightshade

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This adapter fits the 220v plug in my house. Is there a reason I couldn't cut it in the middle and wire the GFCI breaker in?

Full disclosure: I am nearly electrically incompetent.
I guess you could...but your disclosure makes me question why you would. Piece of mind is worth the cost IMO. @DarrellQ mentions an out of box solution that might work for you up above.
 

doug293cz

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This adapter fits the 220v plug in my house. Is there a reason I couldn't cut it in the middle and wire the GFCI breaker in?

Full disclosure: I am nearly electrically incompetent.
It should work. You could also consider a GFCI breaker in the main panel itself, and leave the wire as-is.
This is the safer option, especially since you are "nearly electrically incompetent." Putting the GFCI in-line will work, but you need to be confident you know how to hook up the GFCI correctly.

Brew on :mug:
 

renstyle

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This adapter fits the 220v plug in my house. Is there a reason I couldn't cut it in the middle and wire the GFCI breaker in?

Full disclosure: I am nearly electrically incompetent.
This is the safer option, especially since you are "nearly electrically incompetent." Putting the GFCI in-line will work, but you need to be confident you know how to hook up the GFCI correctly.
This adapter fits the 220v plug in my house. Is there a reason I couldn't cut it in the middle and wire the GFCI breaker in?

Full disclosure: I am nearly electrically incompetent.
It will work. I've made an adapter to convert that 240V 3-prong NEMA-10/50 you have (with the angled blades) to connect to my default NEMA-14/30 plug that I use on my GFI cable.

I did this because I have a 4-prong NEMA-14 dryer outlet at my place, but my friend has the same 3-prong NEMA-10/50 outlet formerly used for an oven.

I kept it as an additional adapter as it is only needed when brewing at my friend's place, so the adapter stays there.
 

renstyle

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This adapter fits the 220v plug in my house. Is there a reason I couldn't cut it in the middle and wire the GFCI breaker in?
It should work. You could also consider a GFCI breaker in the main panel itself, and leave the wire as-is.
A 240V GFCI breaker in the panel is always the best option. For your situation it would be a bit more involved due to the 3-prong 240V outlet you have. You'd need to bring the outlet as well as the wire "up to code" as well as installing the breaker in the panel.

Your pic is showing a NEMA-10/50 oven plug, which is 3-conductor. As there is no dedicated ground wire (the Neutral wire does that job for this now-deprecated plug) if you were to go the GFCI breaker route, you would also need to pull a new 4-conductor wire to that outlet, and change it out for a NEMA-14/50, which does have a dedicated ground conductor.

1627050590492.png


The current 3-prong plug will work for brewing needs as-is as many folks have already mentioned, just wanted to point out the extra work required if you would go the panel breaker route.
 

Sully1986

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Hey guys, do yall think the Anvil pump head upgrade is worth it? want to add a ball valve in line to better control the pump along with some QDs, but wonder if its worth to just upgrade to a better pump all around or the steel updgraded head is worth it?
 

tracer bullet

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As always it depends on your goals. If you like the Anvil and will stick with it and the pump is working, just do the head to get the NPT's for a valve connection.

If you think you'll end up to a bigger and better system and want to experiment with new methods and whatever else, get a different pump and keep the current one as a backup or just repurpose it somehow.
 

Sully1986

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Thanks man, Also to the 240v conversation, I did the short circuit video switch. With my brother being an engineer, who also uses the foundry, i made about a 25ft extension that goes to my dryer plug then to my foundry, my entire house is GFCi protected and so far no issues running 240.

Brewed this a couple weeks ago, and tasted last nite. My take on a local DFW favorite blood and Honey.

9lbs pale,3lbs wheat ( used a tx wheat called Denton County Wheat)1.25lb orange blossom Honey, Northern Brewer hops 1oz for bitter finished boil with 6oz sweet orange peal, Cinnamon powder and All spice. Pitched Wyeast 1056 american ale.

OG was 1.060 right where i wanted, finished at 1.012

Came out glorious and tastes amazing, will have to do side by side, Its got a different flavor, as not using the blood oranges, but i find I may prefer it.
 

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