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85 year old hop plant...

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bkelley0804

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I'd do an ounce since you have 0 clue about what variety it is. Who knows, might be the best beer you ever make!
Took your advice with the single ounce. Good place to start. 👍

Note: there wasn’t much aroma during the boil, guessing this will be a malty ale. OG is 1.048

Looking forward to doubling hops for the next brew and comparing the results. 🍻
 
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kmarkstevens

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Did you try the wort? You'll know if it's really malty and if you can actually taste the hops. I've done at least one wet hop beer that was undrinkably sweet. So, I'd sample and see what you think? If it's not hoppy enough, you can make a hop tea or a concentrated boil and add in to the fermenter to bring up the hoppyness.

My understanding is most folks recommend 5-7 ounces wet hop versus 1 ounce dried hop. My 2 cents of experience is that these days, I pick a big pail of hops, and then just load them in. I mean full handfuls at 15, 10, 5 and flame out. A pound or more. I'm no hop head, and past coupla brews were not too hoppy but definately fresh hopped.

I'll be doing a Northern Brewer this weekend that looks to have at least half of the hops to be pretty ripe (and then I'll go back in two weeks or so to pick of the rest).
 

Northern_Brewer

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Why don't you make a few hop teas first in plain water with various amounts of hop additions to get a better idea of the bitterness and the flavour of the hop.

Dryhopping with fresh cones is a nogo imo due to the risk of infection.
Plenty of British commercial brewers dry hop with green hops. One advantage we have at the homebrew scale is that we can eg freeze them briefly just to kill some of the nasties, but if there's enough hops and alcohol and acidity in the brew, then not much should grow in it.
 

Northern_Brewer

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I'll be doing a Northern Brewer this weekend
:eek:

at least half of the hops to be pretty ripe (and then I'll go back in two weeks or so to pick of the rest).
That sort of thing is pretty handy for putting the first harvest in the boil, and the rest as dry hop towards the end of fermentation.
 
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bkelley0804

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Went and got some more hops off of “the beast” yesterday. I’d like to dry hop with these but not risk an infection. Should I....

A. Make a hop tea and add that to secondary
B. Boil the hops and add that water plus hops to secondary
C. Just add the hops directly to secondary in a muslin bag / loose
D. Something else I’m not thinking of at the moment

Please advise! Thank you everyone for your support 🍻
A49F6300-1299-457A-B717-B335F7966383.jpeg
 
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B-Hoppy

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Hop tea and boiling the hops will basically just add a little more bitterness but it will be diluted down or ameliorated by the additional water so it may be a moot point?

The act of moving the beer to a secondary, or bottling or kegging for that matter, always carries some risk of infection (and oxygen pick-up) as sanitation of all the components involved with the move can create some problems depending on your level of brewing experience.

The fact that the beer now has a certain level of alcohol in it will help lessen the chances of possible infection and help act as a solvent for the oils contained in the hops to be incorporated into the flavor/aroma character of the beer. I use whole hops exclusively and dry hop in the primary with about 1oz per 5 gal and also at the same rate in the keg and have been doing so since the 90's with great success and no issues (except for one that I recall).

One suggestion would be to do a sensory test on those hops starting with some of the nice green ones and try to judge that aroma against the brown ones. It looks like you have some downy mildew infected cones (hard to confirm from a distance) but in my experience, those that are infected tend to have a much less appealing aroma than those that don't have the issue. I don't know what the mechanism is that causes this deterioration in aroma but I've noticed it long ago and have been mostly successful at keeping these sorts of issues at bay through a good spray program throughout the season. Hope this helps.
 

NitrogenWidget

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Went and got some more hops off of “the beast” yesterday. I’d like to dry hop with these but not risk an infection. Should I....

A. Make a hop tea and add that to secondary
B. Boil the hops and add that water plus hops to secondary
C. Just add the hops directly to secondary in a muslin bag / loose
D. Something else I’m not thinking of at the moment

Please advise! Thank you everyone for your support 🍻
View attachment 698791
how do those smell?
any hops I grew that ended up brown smelled like onions.
the green ones should still be good.

I make a hop tea by boiling water in a tea kettle, give it a min to not be boiling temp after it whistles, then add it to a french press with an OZ of leaf hops (most i can fit comfortably) then it steep for a good 30 mins.
Press the plunger and pour it into the keg.

what i'm doing is really no different then flame out hops added to the kettle while my wort chiller works.
 

Northern_Brewer

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And whatever you do - don't hang about. Hops go off really quickly once they're off the bine - you need to be adding them to wort the same day that they're picked, ideally within a couple of hours. When brewers in Kent make green hop beers, they start the boil before they go to the hop garden to pick up the hops, to minimise the time from picking to wort.
 
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bkelley0804

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I posted in this thread 9 yrs ago. I must say, the owners of this plant and those posting here on their behalf are not very ambitious people. I've made approx 1000 batches of beer since then. Git yer sh1t together and make some beer. My god.
Apparently you missed the post about me finally making a batch lol

On the same note, yes... I agree... I’ve been slacking over the past few years. Back on it now, brewing one a week 🍻 (currently have 4 carboys filled)

Regarding the brew using “the beast“

Added the wet hops to secondary today. Trimmed the cones and put them back in the freezer two days ago. They smell amazing and were quite sticky. Next year I’m wearing gloves 🧤
 
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