Why the hell can't I seem to hit my target FG with this IIPA recipe??? - Page 3 - Home Brew Forums
Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > Fermentation & Yeast > Why the hell can't I seem to hit my target FG with this IIPA recipe???

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Old 08-04-2013, 05:06 PM   #21
homebrewbeliever
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Quote:
Originally Posted by midfielder5
Many of the commercial IIPA's I have seen clone recipes for, like Pliny, Heady Topper mash low. So try it and see if it fixes your issue. Otherwise you will make an American barleywine like you have now.
Okay, will do. So do you think that I should mash at 148*F, or would 150*F suffice? By the way, I was wrong, and I mashed this last batch at 154*F.


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Old 08-04-2013, 05:13 PM   #22
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Why the resistance to mashing low? Anyways, read up on it and decide what you'd like. I already said I would mash at 148, as did a few other posters.
cheers.



 
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Old 08-04-2013, 05:17 PM   #23
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Quote:
Originally Posted by midfielder5
Why the resistance to mashing low? Anyways, read up on it and decide what you'd like. I already said I would mash at 148, as did a few other posters.
cheers.
LOL, ok, what the hell, I have had two batches that have ended up too sweet, and a too-sweet batch of an IIPA is an expensive mistake... I'll go ahead and mash at 148*F. I am not resistant, I've just never mashed anything that low before. Still, HBT community has not really sent me astray yet, so I will just go ahead and stop being hesitant and do it. Thank you very much for your help. Cheers.
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Old 08-04-2013, 05:24 PM   #24
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Sorry if it seemed harsh I should have put a smiley face after my first sentence, but you took it the way I meant.
If it creeps up to 150 from 148-- I am sure it will be fine. It is way the hell better than your now revised comment of mashing at 154* which can quickly creep up to 156-158* (ack! I only mash a Mild that high!)

regards, Wendy

 
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Old 08-04-2013, 05:37 PM   #25
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Also, remember that when you mash low, mashing longer will help to make an attenuative wort. Shoot for a 90-120 mash, at least...

 
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Old 08-04-2013, 06:10 PM   #26
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I think you'll be pleasantly surprised by the results from mashing lower! Even if you're cooler mashing and it starts ~148 and drifts down to 145, it'll work out great.

And, as always, be real careful of temp fluctuations during fermentation. Even just a degree or two jump (of the actual wort not the air) over a few hours, I've had beers finish 3-4 points higher than normal. If temps drop a little at night, throw a sheet or thin towel over it for the night.

 
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Old 08-04-2013, 06:53 PM   #27
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Thanks, and will do. I've been using iBrewMaster for my brew calculator, and it is suggesting to mash for 75 minutes. Do you all think a 90-120 minute mash would really make make a substantial difference over 75? I suppose it would just allow me to be super sure that a complete conversion occurs...
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Old 08-04-2013, 06:55 PM   #28
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Quote:
Originally Posted by homebrewbeliever View Post
Thanks, and will do. I've been using iBrewMaster for my brew calculator, and it is suggesting to mash for 75 minutes. Do you all think a 90-120 minute mash would really make make a substantial difference over 75? I suppose it would just allow me to be super sure that a complete conversion occurs...
No, I see no advantage to something like a 120 minute mash. A 90 minute mash is a good idea for a cooler mash temperature (under 150) to ensure that you have complete conversion, but it's probably not necessary. It won't hurt to go 90 minutes if you're mashing at 148, though!
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Old 08-04-2013, 07:17 PM   #29
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Yooper

No, I see no advantage to something like a 120 minute mash. A 90 minute mash is a good idea for a cooler mash temperature (under 150) to ensure that you have complete conversion, but it's probably not necessary. It won't hurt to go 90 minutes if you're mashing at 148, though!
When Yooper speaks, I listen. You have never done anything but give me impeccable advice... you're like the female Dali Lama of home brewing =) I will do a 90 minute mash since I'll be mashing at 148*F.

Yooper, one unrelated question, but since you're probably going to see this reply and since I know you make wines: I am about to blend a sweet wine with a dry wine that I dried out with EC-1118. The wine has cleared and all looks well, and I am wondering if you think I should add Kmeta and Ksorbate to stabilize the dry wine before blending it with the sweet. I am going to keg it because I want it sparkling, but I don't want the fermentation starting up again in the keg (I don't know if this would even happen, but I know that EC-1118 is a beast of a yeast). Even so, I would love to avoid using the Kmeta and Ksorbate if I can get away with it. What do you think? Would it hurt to just go ahead and blend the wines in the keg and then put under pressure without adding the stabilizers?
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Old 08-04-2013, 08:31 PM   #30
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Another thing to consider trying next time is adding your simple sugars later in the fermentation. Brew and pitch as you have been but once you see fermentation slowing add your sugars into the carboy (dissolve in a small amount of water). This will allow the yeast to eat up the less fermentable long-chain sugars first and then have the simple sugars for desert. Theres always room for desert.



 
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