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Old 07-07-2012, 02:38 PM   #1
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Default Will These Temps Work For A Lager Fermentation

I tried posting this in the fermentation section with no luck, so I will Try here.

I am planning on using my keg mini fridge to ferment an Octoberfest Lager on Monday, but I'm not sure if the temp will work. Im guessing that it will, but just want some input from the pros. The bottom of the fridge is 43 and the top of the Carboy is 50. (6-10C)

The yeast is:

Wyeast Octoberfest Lager Blend 2633

Flocculation: medium-low
Attenuation: 73-77%
Temperature Range: 48-58 F (9-14 C)
Alcohol Tolerance: approximately 9% ABV


Im guessing the wort will heat up a few degrees also due to the fermentation.

Thanks for the help!


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Old 07-07-2012, 02:43 PM   #2
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You'll be fine. Consider taking it out for a diacetyl rest after a couple weeks, letting it rise to 60-65f or so, then lager it a couple weeks.


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Old 07-07-2012, 04:16 PM   #3
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Thanks for the reply!

I was planing on taking it out for a Diacetyl rest when it hits about 1.020. Not sure if that is too high or not. Starting gravity will be around 1.052

Then I plan to keg it and crank the fridge back down to its normal setting and let it lager for a couple months....If it last that long.
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Old 07-07-2012, 04:23 PM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CTS
Thanks for the reply!

I was planing on taking it out for a Diacetyl rest when it hits about 1.020. Not sure if that is too high or not. Starting gravity will be around 1.052

Then I plan to keg it and crank the fridge back down to its normal setting and let it lager for a couple months....If it last that long.
I'm not of the camp that values long lager or conditioning times... I'd let it sit 2-3 weeks in keg at 42F or so, on carb, then cool and serve. That's just me
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Old 07-07-2012, 05:49 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Brulosopher

I'm not of the camp that values long lager or conditioning times... I'd let it sit 2-3 weeks in keg at 42F or so, on carb, then cool and serve. That's just me
In sure that's what will happen. Im to impatient to let it sit, plus a sample here and there turns into an empty keg. Haha

What are your thoughts on taking it to 65 at 1.020?
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Old 07-07-2012, 05:58 PM   #6
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bringing the temp up slow for a d-rest when 75% or so of fermentation is complete is fine. But a D-rest is not necessarily if you pitch your yeast at or below your intended ferm temp, and you pitch enough yeast. Just remember lagers need twice as much yeast as ales do,
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Old 07-07-2012, 06:38 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sonex
bringing the temp up slow for a d-rest when 75% or so of fermentation is complete is fine. But a D-rest is not necessarily if you pitch your yeast at or below your intended ferm temp, and you pitch enough yeast. Just remember lagers need twice as much yeast as ales do,
I have a starter I made (first one) and have enough yeast as per yestcalc.com. I will be pitching the yeast at 65ish. Then putting it straight into the fridge. I don't really have a way to slowly warm it up, so I will have to hope for the best when I move it to the basement. I have a Belgian Wit that is waiting for the lager to get done. It's sitting at 64 at just room temp.

Truthfully I am kinda worried about the starter...my first time using one, hope it works out.

I made a Sam Adams lager 2 winters ago and never made a starter and that worked out just fine.
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Old 07-07-2012, 07:04 PM   #8
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I hope you don't intend to pitch and ferment a lager at 65f. A more appropriated temp would be around 50F.
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Old 07-07-2012, 08:27 PM   #9
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Nope. Pitch and put into fridge. (43-50)
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Old 07-07-2012, 09:27 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CTS

In sure that's what will happen. Im to impatient to let it sit, plus a sample here and there turns into an empty keg. Haha

What are your thoughts on taking it to 65 at 1.020?
Raising to 65 at 1.020 should be fine. I would recommend you pitch at a much lower temp, though. After brewing, chilling, and transferring wort to fermenter, move it to your fridge for a couple hours until it is below 58F, at most. I've successfully done this multiple times, so don't worry about naysayers. That way you'll avoid stressing the yeast. Cheers!


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